Bit Information (Curb and Western type bits and hackamores) - Page 5 - The Horse Forum

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post #41 of 125 Old 01-24-2011, 04:56 PM Thread Starter
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Knack, I don't mind at all if you print it out . That's the whole reason why I put it on here so that folks could maybe find out things that they didn't know before.

As for the extra rings on some of the bits, you'll get a different answer from everyone you ask LOL. On a curb bit, you always attach the curb strap to the ring that is above the mouthpiece. On the ones with the ring at the mouthpiece, part of the reason is that it keeps the mouthpiece stationary on the shank so that it doesn't slide up and down to create a gag action. Another part is that you can more slowly transition a horse up from a snaffle with these types of bits. You can put your reins on the rings by the mouthpiece and it makes the bit sort of a hybrid between a snaffle and a leverage bit. Along those same lines, you can use 4 reins (a pair on the mouthpiece rings and a pair on the lower rings) to help to minimize the confusion on the part of the horse and help better prepare them for the reins to be used on just the shank ends.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
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post #42 of 125 Old 01-31-2011, 08:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs View Post
Yep, in any bit that is worth it's cost, either 6 or 6 1/2 is about as short a shanks as I have been able to find. My fave bit is in a link a couple of posts above this but I also really like the looks of this bit. I will probably end up getting one of these as well just to see how it feels.
Antique Low Port Hinged Futurity Bit - Statelinetack.com
I've read your thread a few times now and really appreciate the information as I'm just beginning to transition my mare to western (she's 5 and has been doing english for 2 years).

I've tried several different bits and am leaning towards trying a bit similar to the one you posted that I've quoted. I'm currently using a tom-thumb with straight shanks on her and while it seems to be working well -- I'm trying to find something else as I'm not sure it's the best one I could be using.

My Question::: She's doing pretty good with neck reining, but still has quite a ways to go... will the bit quoted above allow for direct reining still while I continue to teach her to neck-rein?

Thank you .. any suggestions or opinions are welcome. :)
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post #43 of 125 Old 02-01-2011, 12:05 AM Thread Starter
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Zaudika, I am glad that you were able to get some good information from this post. Yes, that bit will still allow you to direct rein without being too confusing. The biggest problem I have ever run into with putting a mild curb on a horse that isn't solid with the neck rein is that sometimes they get confused at first due to the different pressures. Patience and exaggerated cues get them through that quickly though and that stage doesn't usually last very long.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
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post #44 of 125 Old 02-05-2011, 12:23 PM
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Still getting great info from this post. However, I saw something called a happy mouth and can not find it mentioned in either of the bit post...What is it?
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post #45 of 125 Old 02-05-2011, 04:08 PM Thread Starter
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A happy mouth is just a description of a bit that has some kind of rubberized or plastic cover over the metal of the mouth.


I don't have any experience with these.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
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post #46 of 125 Old 02-17-2011, 03:49 PM
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the "S" shape in the shank actually do anything or is it more for look?
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post #47 of 125 Old 02-17-2011, 03:51 PM Thread Starter
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Nope, just more for look.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
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post #48 of 125 Old 02-17-2011, 03:52 PM
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Kay, Thanx :)
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post #49 of 125 Old 03-08-2011, 04:36 PM
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You had mentioned about the hooded port bit and not having much experience with them. The hooded bit is kind of a mid way between a ported bit and a spade. As you know a spade if used incorrectly can be down right dangerous. With the hooded port you have a good bit for the rider that isn't quite at the point where they can ride a bit without hurting the horse or themselves but they can start learning the basics of a spade bit use. The roller ,or cricket, as it's sometimes called is there to encourage the horse to pick the bit up. Instead of the bit just kinda hanging in the mouth like happens with alot of bit , These and the spade bit you want the horse to actaully hold with the tongue and "pick it up". If the horse is rolling and playing with the cricket he is soft throughout his mouth and ultmately his whole body. There fore he is more likely to pick up on the subtle cues of a spade bit or in this case the hooded port. It has the copper hood to promote saliva production and to kinda fill in the tongue relief. Making it easier again for the horse to "pick up" bit. It is still a fairly advanced bit for horse and rider and when moving a horse into this bit it is usually used with the two rein vaquero style of transition. Which is a rawhide hakamore and the bit in cojunction. When you start out you will use the hackamore 99 perent of the time and slowly work toward the bit more and more until ultimately the bosal is no longer needed. Just like the spade bit.
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post #50 of 125 Old 03-31-2011, 03:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Country Girl View Post
the "S" shape in the shank actually do anything or is it more for look?
If you're referring to a shank like this



Then it is designed to keep the horse from reaching out and biting to get a hold of the shank, which could of course be both dangerous and super annoying.
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