Bits Bits Bits!!! - Page 2
 
 

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Bits Bits Bits!!!

This is a discussion on Bits Bits Bits!!! within the Horse Tack and Equipment forums, part of the Horse Tack category

    View Poll Results: Do you know the pressure ratio on the bit you use??
    Yes... 3 25.00%
    Not exactly, but I have an idea. 4 33.33%
    No 2 16.67%
    I don't even know what a pressure ratio is... 3 25.00%
    Voters: 12. You may not vote on this poll

     
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        08-20-2008, 05:53 PM
      #11
    Banned
    Cool, I didn't even know about the pressure ratio until now! Very informative. :)
    I ride my horse in a knock-off version of the Sprenger KK Ultra. Before that we used a French training loose ring snaffle, which is almost the same.
         
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        08-20-2008, 05:54 PM
      #12
    Weanling
    I'm glad everyone is learning something!!
         
        08-20-2008, 06:19 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    [sciencegeek]This is why everyone should have a sound knowledge of basic physics! [/sciencegeek]

    In my third ever lesson, my instructor took the time to explain the difference between a snaffle and a curb bit - the snaffle only acts on the mouth, anything with any kind of lever system acts on the poll too and helps keep the head down. Most horses at my stables are ridden in a snaffle; the horse I had that day had a gag bit. A friend of mine had a chat about bits with me when showing me all the parts of her horse's bridle, explaining about the nutcracker effect and what makes the internal part milder or more harsh.

    Curbs are relatively rare here amongst riders, I think. I typically only see them on double bridles.
         
        08-20-2008, 07:02 PM
      #14
    Weanling
    Thats great that your trainer took time to teach you that!

    Most trainers wouldn't. There are a lot of trainers out there who just assume that you will learn on your own. But that's what they're for!! Trainers need to remember that they are not only training you in the rind while you ride but should also teach you many other things! Not to bash on trainers because I have just always had bad ones and now that I've found one that I love, I am very grateful.
         
        08-20-2008, 07:46 PM
      #15
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by claireauriga
    [sciencegeek]This is why everyone should have a sound knowledge of basic physics! [/sciencegeek]
    Thank you thank you thank you! I've been saying this to riders for ages and they just look at me like I've grown a second head. There is a lot of physics in riding.

    Good thread ArabianAmor.

    To add to what iridehorses explained, the shape of the shank on a leverage bit also has an effect on its strength. Shanks that curve toward the horse's nose (like on a grazing curb) are the mildest, and the sharper the curve the better. Straight shanks are in the middle, and shanks that curve back toward the rider (meaning the ring where the reins attach is in front of the mouth piece) are the most severe. Similarly, the backward curve shape of the ring on D-ring snaffles and kimberwicks increases their strength.
         
        08-20-2008, 07:50 PM
      #16
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ponyboy
    To add to what iridehorses explained, the shape of the shank on a leverage bit also has an effect on its strength. Shanks that curve toward the horse's nose (like on a grazing curb) are the mildest, and the sharper the curve the better. Straight shanks are in the middle, and shanks that curve back toward the rider (meaning the ring where the reins attach is in front of the mouth piece) are the most severe. Similarly, the backward curve shape of the ring on D-ring snaffles and kimberwicks increases their strength.
    Ooo thank you for that! That is something I didn't know and I can now use for my paper!
         
        08-20-2008, 08:25 PM
      #17
    Yearling
    There's physics in everything and it makes things a) more interesting and b) easier to understand when you spot it xD But then, I'm the kind of person who pictures force balances on her legs when she's walking, so ...

    Understanding how the length and shape of shanks affects their strength is all to do with moments - forces acting about a pivot :) Here's a rough explanation, and you can skip over it if you think it's boring.

    Moment = force x perpendicular distance from the pivot. This is all to do with balancing people on see-saws - you can get a 50kg person to balance a 100kg person if the lighter person sits twice as far away from the centre, because then you have the same moment going clockwise and anticlockwise. The pivot point is the centre of the see-saw (the point that it moves around), and the forces acting on it are the weights of the two people.

    Basically the greater the difference in length between purchase and shank, the more force has to be exerted by the purchase on the poll to give the same moment about the bit as the rein is exerting. You're a light person pulling on the shank so you need a heavy person on the purchase to balance it.

    Now, I'm less sure about the next bit (pun unintended), but fiddling around with mechanics problems has long been a favourite pasttime of mine, so let's consider this a fun learning exercise for me. Have I got the following bit right?

    I've been thinking about the effect of curves on the shanks, and I'm pretty sure two factors lead to the varying strengths - one, the angle at which the rein applies the force, and two, the perpendicular distance from the pivot. The more the angle between rein and purchase deviates from 90 degrees, the less force will be exerted. Different curves change this angle.

    If the shank curves back, it's milder, because the 'perpendicular distance' from the end of the shank to the bit is less. That is, if you measured the distance in line with the purchase, a 4" shank that curves back will have an end that's closer to the pivot point than a 4" shank that sticks straight out. This diagram might help explain that as the idea of 'perpendicular distance' can be hard to grasp. Pretend the reins are parallel ;)



    The exact difference in strength between two bits depends a lot on the individual set-up and how the rider holds the reins, but it'd be pretty easy to set up a force balance and compare them once you knew the lengths and angles involved!

    Have I got the basic idea right? I know there are other factors involved as well. It is half past midnight, and I've been on holiday for three months, so I might not be quite up to par when it comes to figuring this stuff out xD
         
        08-20-2008, 08:40 PM
      #18
    Weanling
    Thank you so much!! That was an awesome illustration! I am a very visual learner!
         
        08-21-2008, 10:45 AM
      #19
    Foal
    What a great thread! And posted at the perfect time for me. ;) I'm looking for a new bit and thru some advice from here......may have found something that will work better for my horse and myself. There are some very knowledgable people out there that we all could learn a few things from! I've been riding for ages, but never knew about the force ratio or that it was even important. I guess a person can learn something new every day!

    Maybe when you are done with your paper, you could post it for us to read????
         
        08-21-2008, 11:56 AM
      #20
    Weanling
    Yeah! I was actually planning on it. But just fyi. Its not an english paper. It is just something I am doing for my trainer as homework. But it should still be pretty good. Especially with all the input here! :)
    I should have it done today so I'll be back probably to post it.
    Oh and countrygirl: best of luck on your new bit!!
         

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