Chambons & Market Harboroughs
 
 

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Chambons & Market Harboroughs

This is a discussion on Chambons & Market Harboroughs within the Horse Tack and Equipment forums, part of the Horse Tack category
  • Chambons for horses
  • Horse equipment-chambons

 
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    12-19-2008, 06:11 AM
  #1
Foal
Chambons & Market Harboroughs

Hey Everyone

I'm just wanting to know everyone's opinions on chambons and market harborough's -- the positives and negatives and what kind of horse they would use it on.


Thanks!
     
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    12-23-2008, 04:38 AM
  #2
Weanling
I just got a Market Harborough for my birthday, but I've only ridden my horse in it once, so I can't tell you much about it experience-wise..
BUT I found an article by a trainer I really like that explains it very well, and is actually what convinced me to buy one.

The Market Harborough

It's long but WELL worth the read!
     
    12-23-2008, 05:30 AM
  #3
Trained
Ive never used one but I just want to say be careful that you arent masking any problems by using the MH. Some people tend to think that forcing a horses head down will fic a problem when in reality it only provides a band aid type effect. Not saying that's what you will do but sometimes before using these things its a good idea to try and figure why the horse is throwing its head eg; pain, poor fitting saddle etc once you have ruled out any of those things then look to gadgetry to help :)

Just my 2 ;)
     
    12-23-2008, 04:40 PM
  #4
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzyrider    
ive never used one but I just want to say be careful that you arent masking any problems by using the MH. Some people tend to think that forcing a horses head down will fic a problem when in reality it only provides a band aid type effect. Not saying that's what you will do but sometimes before using these things its a good idea to try and figure why the horse is throwing its head eg; pain, poor fitting saddle etc once you have ruled out any of those things then look to gadgetry to help :)

Just my 2 ;)
That's what I like about the Market Harborough, it doesn't FORCE a horse to put its head down, it merely ENCOURAGES them. When the rider picks up a contact, the device engages and puts pressure on the horses mouth and as soon as they put their head down where it should be it releases, rewarding them. It does not hold their head down!
It is aimed mainly at novice riders who don't know how to get their horse to collect, and act sort of like "training wheels" (to quote the article I posted above), and the idea is that you work towards maining the collecting without the device.

Jazzy, if you didn't read the article please do, and even if it doesn't change your opinion its very interesting.
     
    12-23-2008, 04:48 PM
  #5
Yearling
It is still encouraging a head set, and a headset at all does not facilitate any kind of collection. By riding and creating a headset--it doesn't matter if you force or 'encourage'--you are riding the horse from back to front.

The article hits far from the true 'collection' mark, because if you take a look at the horse they 'fixed', it is FAR behind the vertical, and broken at the ... third, fourth, maybe even FIFTH vertebra. I know the horse is in a 'long and low headset', but that doesn't excuse his neck being broken in half almost and his head that far behind the vertical.

It seems to me that the MH teaches the horse to escape bit pressure. They will be TOO soft in the face, always tucking their nose away from the bit to escape pressure. The horse will never accept contact, because the way this system works is to release all pressure when the horse tucks his nose.

Not really any different then draw reins or any kind of head-setting device.
     
    12-23-2008, 05:25 PM
  #6
Trained
Redhawk - I did read the article ;) to me anything other than the rider gaining headset through proper seat and hands is forcing it. I havent used them but I know what they are and how they work ;)

As mayfield has mentioned all it does is make the horse keep his head down without getting a correct frame. This can be confusing to young riders who think their horse is on the bit and carrying himself correctly all because his head is down.

You are entitled to your views though too :) I personally just don't like anything like that unless pain issues have been ruled out and the horse is being plain bratty and dangerously throwing his head.

Just my opinion
     
    12-23-2008, 08:40 PM
  #7
Foal
Okay thanks everyone!
     
    12-23-2008, 09:58 PM
  #8
Weanling
Don't worry guys , im not under any illusion that the MH is going to magically fix my horse and get him to collect, and I know it doesn't give proper collection, I just thought it would be a good place for us to start, and to encourage my horse not to run around with his head in the air like a lama, lol. I am also getting some lessons over the summer and I'm constantly doing research and reading up about it and stuff. For me the MH isn't a solution, just a step.
And Jazzy, I hope I didn't come across, I don't know... snarky or anything, if I did I didn't mean to. I do value your opinion, and I know you've had tons more experience than me!
     
    12-23-2008, 11:16 PM
  #9
Showing
If you want to use one by any means go for it. The main purpose of the chambon is essentially prevent the horse from raising his head. It puts pressure on the pole(which horses typically dislike so they quickly learn to not raise their head passed a certain point) but also puts pressure on the corners or rough of the mouth depending on the horse's head position. Once the horse learns that keeping his head where it should be moves the bit to a more comfortable position it's supposed to make them salivate.

To me a horse's head carriage is directly related to his musculature and fitness/training level (topline etc etc) so attaching a piece of equipment (even if you can slowly adjust it with time) to force them there just doesn't make sense to me. A horse will carry himself there when he physically ready.

These devices are the same as any other(side reins, certain bits etc). Tho they can aid the rider on the ground or in the saddle, they are not necessarily in the horse's best interest. :)
     
    12-27-2008, 01:57 AM
  #10
Foal
I have used both devices but prefer a De Gogue which is a combination Chambon/Gogue. I don't usually ride in it, instead I do a lot of ground driving and lunging in it. It is fully adjustable and encourages the horse to engage his back and hind-end instead of simply forcing his head and neck into a frame. The horse is able to stretch down and forward without restriction. By using it as a ground training aid the horse is able to condition and build muscle through the back and neck without interference from the rider. A horse that is properly conditioned through the topline along with proper use of aids has a much easier time framing and engaging the hind end when under saddle. I've also found that most of the horses that I work with are more receptive to the De Gogue because it is less restrictive.

Jennifer
     

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