Choosing a stronger bit....
   

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Choosing a stronger bit....

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  • Foal galloping
  • Kimberwick vs corkscrew bit

 
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    11-03-2008, 10:55 AM
  #1
Foal
Choosing a stronger bit....

Am trying to choose a new bit for my mare, she gets strong and heavy in hand over fences and out in the fields and I'd like to be able to get her back easier. When working on the flat she rides lovely in a oval mouth eggbutt but I can't decide which bit I'd like to use over fenses and out in the field.

Here are the ones I am looking at, what are the pros cons of each?

Kimberwick - http://www.smartpakequine.com/productcla...

Slow Twist - http://www.smartpakequine.com/productcla...

Corkscrew - http://www.smartpakequine.com/productcla...

2 Ring Elevator - http://www.smartpakequine.com/productcla...

Thanks!
     
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    11-03-2008, 12:25 PM
  #2
Weanling
My mare was doing the same thing so I tried a corkscrew and she has been much better ever since. She is very soft and quiet and we haven't been better. I don't know anything about the other bits since I have not tried them.
     
    11-03-2008, 11:30 PM
  #3
Showing
Have you tried using different training exercises to make the mare listen rather than going to a stronger bit? Generally people go to a stronger bit as a "band-aid" solution to a bigger problem.

Kimberwicke: has 2 rein settings for "mild" or "moderate" curb action. I don't like kimberwickes because there is no way to not ride on the curb. There is no rein option where there is no curb action, such as in a pelham - you have two reins in a pelham, and so you ride on the snaffle mostly, then if you need the curb rein, there it is.

Slow twist: Honestly, I don't like any single-jointed bit, as this is. You get crackerjack action on the tongue, and the horse tends to bury it in the tongue to relieve palete action.
Getting to the actual bit you posted... I don't like it at all. It's better than putting a single wire fast twist in, but it's still using sharp edges on the horse's sensitive lips.

Corkscrew: see above.

2 ring elevator: This has the action of a gag bit. It is a double joint, so yay for that. The action of the bit here will have poll pressure when you use your reins, so it is a more severe bit. It doesn't have "curb" action per se, because it doesn't have a curb chain, but it does act slightly like a leverage bit in the fact that it has a bit of purchase and "shank."



I always tell clients to look at the training before going to a more severe bit.
     
    11-04-2008, 03:13 PM
  #4
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
Have you tried using different training exercises to make the mare listen rather than going to a stronger bit? Generally people go to a stronger bit as a "band-aid" solution to a bigger problem.

Kimberwicke: has 2 rein settings for "mild" or "moderate" curb action. I don't like kimberwickes because there is no way to not ride on the curb. There is no rein option where there is no curb action, such as in a pelham - you have two reins in a pelham, and so you ride on the snaffle mostly, then if you need the curb rein, there it is.

Slow twist: Honestly, I don't like any single-jointed bit, as this is. You get crackerjack action on the tongue, and the horse tends to bury it in the tongue to relieve palete action.
Getting to the actual bit you posted... I don't like it at all. It's better than putting a single wire fast twist in, but it's still using sharp edges on the horse's sensitive lips.

Corkscrew: see above.

2 ring elevator: This has the action of a gag bit. It is a double joint, so yay for that. The action of the bit here will have poll pressure when you use your reins, so it is a more severe bit. It doesn't have "curb" action per se, because it doesn't have a curb chain, but it does act slightly like a leverage bit in the fact that it has a bit of purchase and "shank."



I always tell clients to look at the training before going to a more severe bit.
you saved me a lot of typing JDI!
     
    11-04-2008, 06:51 PM
  #5
Banned
I agree with JDI but if I were to choose between all the bits presented I would take the Kimberwick. At the mildest setting it gives just the slightest more power and has the least "curb" effect. I am dead set against any bit with a twist or screw effect as even with the reins loose that bit's twist effect never dimishes.

The Kimberwick is the bit used on my horse when he is jumping. Not for the extra power but as a safety factor as he is a stallion.
     
    11-04-2008, 07:48 PM
  #6
Foal
I like Kimberwicks too!! I'd stay away from the twisted metals myself, I've been riding for 10 yrs but I still don't trust that I won't ever accidently bump the horse in the mouth wether from spooking or from galloping or practicing turns or even tripping, it could happen. And actually you could use your Kimberwick just like a d ring, just don't attach the reins in the fixed slots, attack them just like a regular d-ring.
     
    11-04-2008, 09:06 PM
  #7
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zappasowner    
I like Kimberwicks too!! I'd stay away from the twisted metals myself, I've been riding for 10 yrs but I still don't trust that I won't ever accidently bump the horse in the mouth wether from spooking or from galloping or practicing turns or even tripping, it could happen. And actually you could use your Kimberwick just like a d ring, just don't attach the reins in the fixed slots, attack them just like a regular d-ring.


I'm curious as to why you would attach the reins like you would on a regular D-ring - you are loosing what makes the kimberwick work, the curb effect. If there is no curb effect, you may as well just use a D-ring with a snaffle mouth.

I personally like to use either a loose ring french link, a d-ring french link, or an eggbutt french link on any horse I ride. (Except those strongly opinonated against tongue pressure, then I would go to something with tongue relief.) I don't like using single-jointed bits at all.
     
    11-04-2008, 10:15 PM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    

I'm curious as to why you would attach the reins like you would on a regular D-ring - you are loosing what makes the kimberwick work, the curb effect. If there is no curb effect, you may as well just use a D-ring with a snaffle mouth.

I personally like to use either a loose ring french link, a d-ring french link, or an eggbutt french link on any horse I ride. (Except those strongly opinonated against tongue pressure, then I would go to something with tongue relief.) I don't like using single-jointed bits at all.
Well that's the point the bit is so flexible as to what you can do with it! Sometimes people will use a harsher bit as a tuning bit to get their horses to be more responsive and then move back down to a softer bit, you could do all of this with the Kimberwick without switching all the gear around unless you have alot of bridles. I've personally never understood this tuning bit thing but I've never needed one so I've only read about people using this sort of technique.
     
    11-04-2008, 10:26 PM
  #9
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zappasowner    
Well that's the point the bit is so flexible as to what you can do with it! Sometimes people will use a harsher bit as a tuning bit to get their horses to be more responsive and then move back down to a softer bit, you could do all of this with the Kimberwick without switching all the gear around unless you have alot of bridles. I've personally never understood this tuning bit thing but I've never needed one so I've only read about people using this sort of technique.


In my opinion, a stronger bit should not be used to get a horse more "responsive" - training will do that on its own.
The use of a kimberwick is limited; especially if you're using a straight-bar or any variation of a non-jointed bit.
     
    11-04-2008, 10:45 PM
  #10
Foal
Yeah I agree, but many people rely on stronger bits to get the response they want out of their horse. I've found that by concentrating on my shoulders and seat when I ask for things I can now use MAINLY my shoulders and seat. In order to get a more responsive stop I use the arena and turn him into the wall if he doesn't respond right away and I can't believe this worked, even eventually in the middle of the arena. The horse decides its easier to stop right away instead of having to turn into the wall and stop anyways. I honestly though this advice sounded ******ed but I saw a huge difference in my horses response! As far as turning issues go I use alot of bending/stretching exercises before we even start and lots of figure eights!
     

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