Is this considered a dressage bit?
 
 

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Is this considered a dressage bit?

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  • Legal dressage bits
  • Pelham bits legal for dressage

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    09-27-2012, 11:14 PM
  #1
Yearling
Is this considered a dressage bit?



Someone told me it was, and that I needed to use a shanked bit on my horse because he is a very forward horse and not this. This is the bit I use on all my babies, it's literally the only bit I own, and if they don't respond to it, I'll just train them to soften up until they do.

Anyway, she called it a "3-piece dressage bit". Is that what it's considered? I always called it a D ring french link snaffle.
     
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    09-27-2012, 11:19 PM
  #2
Super Moderator
I think it is legal for showing dressage, but it isn't so common. You stick by your guns with that bit. If it works, it ain't broke and needs no fxing.
     
    09-27-2012, 11:24 PM
  #3
Started
That's a d-ring french-link snaffle, like you said. Never heard of a dressage bit, but this is definitely allowed in dressage (and I believe British Dressage allow snaffles at all levels, including GP - not sure about other countries but they're definitely allowed at lower levels). Frankly I think your "training them til they soften up" is the right way to go about it - harsher bits just cover up training holes, they don't fill them. I wouldn't be using a shanked bit, especially on this person's advice - perhaps by "dressage bit" they meant a curb?
     
    09-27-2012, 11:31 PM
  #4
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
I think it is legal for showing dressage, but it isn't so common. You stick by your guns with that bit. If it works, it ain't broke and needs no fxing.
Well the horse in question is my new horse, who is being delivered to me tomorrow ( ). The lady recommending a shank bit is a friend of the owner, and she's ridden him several times. I have not ridden him. I'm big on groundwork and he needs training. I have no idea how he responds to a bit. He's just going to be a trail horse; I go super slow with training and use lots of detail and softness. She says he is very forward, and that's why she recommends the shanked bit (he is ridden in a TT with a copper mouthpiece, but I'd never be caught dead with one of those lol). She said just for now, until I get him trained. But I won't ride him till he responds to the frenchie, that's usually how I do it. Lol.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom    
That's a d-ring french-link snaffle, like you said. Never heard of a dressage bit, but this is definitely allowed in dressage (and I believe British Dressage allow snaffles at all levels, including GP - not sure about other countries but they're definitely allowed at lower levels). Frankly I think your "training them til they soften up" is the right way to go about it - harsher bits just cover up training holes, they don't fill them. I wouldn't be using a shanked bit, especially on this person's advice - perhaps by "dressage bit" they meant a curb?
She said something about using a Pelham on him, which is what I think when I think "dressage bit" lol. Honestly my goal is to just go bitless with every horse I ride, because I don't show. So hacking around in a halter is what I prefer. But I will use my frenchie at first to soften them up.

Thanks guys. :)
     
    09-27-2012, 11:35 PM
  #5
Yearling
Also am I correct in assuming this is a pretty mild bit? I don't like using any kind of single-jointed bit, snaffle or not, because it can still nutcracker and hit the roof of the horse's mouth or the tongue. That's why I got this one - because it has 3 joints, and conforms better to their mouth (less pressure on the tongue, more on the bars). That's what I was looking for when I was at the tack shop, but I never really asked anyone before. I was looking at Myler bits the other day online, but I'd rather hold it in my hands and twist it around so I can understand how it works before I buy it.
     
    09-27-2012, 11:37 PM
  #6
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Equilove    
She said something about using a Pelham on him, which is what I think when I think "dressage bit" lol. Honestly my goal is to just go bitless with every horse I ride, because I don't show. So hacking around in a halter is what I prefer. But I will use my frenchie at first to soften them up.
If she said that then I wouldn't be listening to a word she said - Pelhams aren't allowed in dressage. I think you're going about it the right way
     
    09-27-2012, 11:43 PM
  #7
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom    
If she said that then I wouldn't be listening to a word she said - Pelhams aren't allowed in dressage. I think you're going about it the right way
Well the pelham thing is my own ignorance then, I once rode a friesian that was trained in dressage in a pelham and so every time I think of dressage I think of a pelham haha. I don't know much about the rules of dressage. She just recommended a pelham, she didn't say it was a dressage bit. I think she recommended it because it has a snaffle and curb action and figured I could use the snaffle and only use the curb as "emergency leverage" lol. She didn't actually say that, but it makes sense. However I prefer to just get solid in a snaffle and go from there. Just like all my OTTBs that are used to being gagged with a snaffle.. gotta start from the veeeeerry beginning... lol. Thanks :) !
     
    09-27-2012, 11:46 PM
  #8
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Equilove    
Also am I correct in assuming this is a pretty mild bit? I don't like using any kind of single-jointed bit, snaffle or not, because it can still nutcracker and hit the roof of the horse's mouth or the tongue. That's why I got this one - because it has 3 joints, and conforms better to their mouth (less pressure on the tongue, more on the bars). That's what I was looking for when I was at the tack shop, but I never really asked anyone before. I was looking at Myler bits the other day online, but I'd rather hold it in my hands and twist it around so I can understand how it works before I buy it.
Yup, one of the mildest bits around - there is no nutcracker with this because of the double joint, and the central lozenge is less intrusive than a Dr Bristol.

I've heard good stuff about Myler bits but not tried one yet - my horse is happy in his french-link eggbutt so I see no point in changing.
Equilove likes this.
     
    09-27-2012, 11:50 PM
  #9
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilHorseOfDoom    
Yup, one of the mildest bits around - there is no nutcracker with this because of the double joint, and the central lozenge is less intrusive than a Dr Bristol.

I've heard good stuff about Myler bits but not tried one yet - my horse is happy in his french-link eggbutt so I see no point in changing.
I believe in training the hands before the horse ;) so the bit shouldn't make a difference anyway. But I like the idea that if I DO have to use a bit, it's something mild and, as you said, non-intrusive.
EvilHorseOfDoom likes this.
     
    09-27-2012, 11:59 PM
  #10
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Equilove    
Well the horse in question is my new horse, who is being delivered to me tomorrow ( ). The lady recommending a shank bit is a friend of the owner, and she's ridden him several times. I have not ridden him. I'm big on groundwork and he needs training. I have no idea how he responds to a bit. He's just going to be a trail horse; I go super slow with training and use lots of detail and softness. She says he is very forward, and that's why she recommends the shanked bit (he is ridden in a TT with a copper mouthpiece, but I'd never be caught dead with one of those lol). She said just for now, until I get him trained. But I won't ride him till he responds to the frenchie, that's usually how I do it. Lol.



She said something about using a Pelham on him, which is what I think when I think "dressage bit" lol. Honestly my goal is to just go bitless with every horse I ride, because I don't show. So hacking around in a halter is what I prefer. But I will use my frenchie at first to soften them up.

Thanks guys. :)

Shanked bits aren't evil. Some horses really prefer a curb bit, especially a mullen mouthed one with porting for tongue relief. This is the most common bit for neck reining, or at least it used to be 30 years ago.
     

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