difference between martingale?
   

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difference between martingale?

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  • Difference between martingale german
  • What kind of martingale is used in eventing

 
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    06-21-2010, 10:40 AM
  #1
Foal
difference between martingale?

Hello, I know martingale are for horses that tend to put their heads up.

But I know three kind of martingale
The standing martingale that goes on the noseband
The running martingale that slide on the reins
And the german martingale,

What is the difference between the three? Do they just offer different actions? Like one would be stronger than the other?
And isnt the german martingale kind of a mix of the standing and running one as you would attach it to the rings on the reins? If so, why would we need the other ones?

Im kind of curious cause I leased a horse for a year in france like 6 years ago, and he had a german martingale. My trainer used to switch which ring on the reins it was on depending on the weather, and mood of my horse. He was in his 16ish years but still had the punch of a 5 years old... pretty much uncontrollable in winter as it is really cold in france
The owner used to tell me he didnt like to work when it was cold
     
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    06-21-2010, 01:45 PM
  #2
Green Broke
A standing martinagle is used mostly by hunter jumpers here and it's to keep the head down. It actually hinders the horse, in my eyes, because the horse can't use it's head and neck properly when need be. It is very restrictive, because it's always in effect.

A running martingale is used on mostly jumpers and eventers. It goes on the reins and is good because it doesn't go into effect (keeping the head down) until the horse throws it's head, so it doesn't hinder the way the horse goes. Of course it has to be ajusted correctly.

I'm not sure how a German martingale works, sorry :)
     
    06-21-2010, 05:48 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by StormyBlues    
A standing martinagle is used mostly by hunter jumpers here and it's to keep the head down. It actually hinders the horse, in my eyes, because the horse can't use it's head and neck properly when need be. It is very restrictive, because it's always in effect
I am amazed by how many people on this forum do not understand the proper usage of a standing martingale. A properly fitting standing martingale should have ALMOST NO restrictive action on a horse's head and neck OTHER THEN not allowing them to evade the bit and throw their head strait up in the air. Basically, it keeps your horse from breaking your teeth with a mouthful of mane. If it affects your horse's headset in the least bit it is not fitted correctly nor being used for it's proper intended use. It is NOT a training aid or a "head set" device, it a "safety" device. However, it can be restrictive if your horse is jumping upper level jumps (think, 4 ft and higher) b/c a horse needs to REALLY use their entire body over something that size. They are also not allowed in eventing b/c they are 'fixed' in place and can't be loosened immediately in case of emergency. On a cross country course there is a much bigger risk of that happening. Although, I have heard that foxhunters use them so i'm not sure why they would be used in fox hunting but not eventing?

A running martingale also keeps the horse from raising his head too high (attached to the reins so puts pressure on the bars of your horse's mouth when he raises his head), but immediately loosens as your horse lowers his head. Again, this doesn't teach a horse to put his head down, it simply doesn't allow him to raise it too high.

The german martingale is more of a "training device" that people use to teach their horse to lower his head and flex his neck. It works fairly similarly IMO to a pair of draw reins. I believe they're prohibited in most shows. I'm personally not a big fan. They pretty much run through the bit and loop back onto a ring on the rein and it gives the rider more leverage to make them carry their head a certain way.
     
    06-21-2010, 05:54 PM
  #4
Green Broke
^

A German Martingale is like the "easy man's" draw reins. I personally am not fond of it - it force's the headset. I think MUCH more can be accomplished by properly using draw reins where you are able to adjust your reins and be more encouraging and less forceful.

German Martingale's can have their place I suppose, but if I see one more person JUMPING in one I'm going to scream. Again, I understand some horses require help with their heads but in my opinion if you aren't educated enough to be properly using draw reins, then you shouldn't be worrying about headset. The ONLY time I really approve of it's use is for students supervised by a coach who can properly adjust it and can't properly use draw reins yet.
     
    06-21-2010, 06:43 PM
  #5
Started
Amen, upnover!!

As an aside, I foxhunted heavily for 2 seasons a few years ago and EVERYBODY at the hunt used breastplates with standing martingales. All were adjusted properly and no horses were restricted or had difficulty jumping, even the larger 3' + stuff.
     
    06-21-2010, 07:21 PM
  #6
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by upnover    
I am amazed by how many people on this forum do not understand the proper usage of a standing martingale. A properly fitting standing martingale should have ALMOST NO restrictive action on a horse's head and neck OTHER THEN not allowing them to evade the bit and throw their head strait up in the air. Basically, it keeps your horse from breaking your teeth with a mouthful of mane. If it affects your horse's headset in the least bit it is not fitted correctly nor being used for it's proper intended use. It is NOT a training aid or a "head set" device, it a "safety" device. However, it can be restrictive if your horse is jumping upper level jumps (think, 4 ft and higher) b/c a horse needs to REALLY use their entire body over something that size. They are also not allowed in eventing b/c they are 'fixed' in place and can't be loosened immediately in case of emergency. On a cross country course there is a much bigger risk of that happening. Although, I have heard that foxhunters use them so i'm not sure why they would be used in fox hunting but not eventing?
This should be printed off in size 200 font and posted repeatedly around all hunter shows in my area.
99% of horses don't need them and 100% of horses are wearing them.
     
    06-21-2010, 07:39 PM
  #7
Trained
Thank you Upnover! Was just about to post the same thing :]

Here in AUS the standing martingale is illegal in any jumping.

A german martingale is a better option that draw reins IMO as depending on where you attach it it's influence is limited - once the head reaches a certain point you are back to your ordinary reins.
     
    06-21-2010, 09:50 PM
  #8
Foal
I am surprised how everybody reacts to my post
But it is nice to see that some people think the same way I do.
French people use mostly running martingale when needed. I havent seen much standing martingale and only one case of german martingale, but again, they were not my horses so not my decisions.

I prefer not to use any martingale or other aids if its not necesary.
I had a mare out of the racetrack and probably used draw reins once in a blue moon, never put anything else on her, and I did fine with her training.

I guess it depends on where you come from, and how the horses are trained around you?
People pick up habits from where they ve been or worked, and its fine with me; but it is so much better when you don't need all these aids
     
    06-21-2010, 10:57 PM
  #9
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by wild_spot    
Thank you Upnover! Was just about to post the same thing :]

Here in AUS the standing martingale is illegal in any jumping.

A german martingale is a better option that draw reins IMO as depending on where you attach it it's influence is limited - once the head reaches a certain point you are back to your ordinary reins.
That's almost the exact reason I don't actually like it. All it does is force an artificial headset because you have no ability to "play" with it. The minute you pick up your normal contact, his head is forced into whatever degree you've set on the reins, end of story. It's probably much safer for a novice to use to avoid problems, but as an actual TRAINING tool, I vastly prefer draw reins as I think you should constantly be adjusted and playing to ensure you're encouraging your horse onto the bit as opposed to forcing him down.
     
    06-22-2010, 12:28 AM
  #10
Trained
^ Just to clarify, i've never touched either and don't think I would unless there was no other choice.

However, from what i've seen, draw reins just have more potential to lever that head right back to the chest - there is no 'stopper' if you will. Anyone so inclined can set the horse as overbent as they like.

However I don't really see many people using draw reins and those I have seen with a german martingale have it set pretty loose and the horses were working pretty nicely. So pretty biased opinon here! (Wow, I just said pretty a LOT).
     

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