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Differences between two bits....

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  • Kimberwicki

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    01-09-2013, 07:16 PM
  #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bsms    
I just received a Kimberwicke in the mail a couple of days ago. I've put it on Mia once and walked along beside her and watched the bit & her when asking for a stop with the reins (couldn't try turns, since she will go where I go regardless).



On the mildest setting, it is still definitely a curb. Mild, but a curb. I bought one with a solid mouthpiece. Interestingly, she acted a bit freaked out when I went to put it in her mouth. And she responded very quickly to very light pressure. Before I owned her, she was sold to a girl for about 4 months prior to being returned, which was when I bought her. I'm wondering if they decided to fix her brakes (or lack thereof) with a strong curb. That might explain why she was so sensitive about her ears when I got her, too! If Mia was actually an unbroke horse at that point, as the trainer I hired last year concluded, then slapping a strong curb on and pulling hard would NOT be a good way to teach a stop!

We spent about 20 minutes walking around with quite a few stops and backups. She seemed much more relaxed at the end, and I then took the bit out and put it back in a few times without her fussing. I plan to ride her in a few hours, but since I'll be all by my lonesome I'll use her normal snaffle for riding today. Maybe put the Kimberwicke in & out a couple of times and do some more ground walking with it.

The longer I'm around horses, the more I believe in taking lots of baby steps in training!
I agree...baby steps. I'm good with that as well....I never play 'hero'.

I also agree with the function of the Kimberwick being too much for an unbroke horse to learn in...that would be rediculous.

The one I've ordered has a half moon lozenge. I have an eggbutt snaffle that I love with the half moon lozenge so I thought I would try this Kimberwick. The Kimberwick I will use on my percheron, who is fine with being soft with a bit. She is very responsive and I am light with my hands. I would just like to replace her current single jointed d-ring snaffle with the double jointed type bit. I think she will be ok with the added poll/bar/chin pressure since she was driven. I will go slow and test her out well.
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    01-09-2013, 07:22 PM
  #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
I suggest you go with the Kimberwick such as bsms has illustrated and put the rein in the lower slot for the percheron. The port offers some tongue relief whereas bits with rollers don't.
Thank you Saddlebag...I will be using the top, milder, port. I don't think it will be foreign to her since she was driven. However, she is very light and responsive, so she doesn't need much pressure. She will only have an occasional arguement with me, but doesn't last long at all. I ride her very lightly in her mouth.

I will say, the Myler shanked bit that I posted the picture of is wonderful! I used it on my pinto today for the first time and she was awesome! She seemed very comfortable. I really like it.
     
    01-09-2013, 07:57 PM
  #23
Weanling
I didn't notice that the shanked bit was a Myler with the barrel middle rather than a broken middle such as is on a Tom Thumb. In my experience those are too unsteady in the mouth and will often create an anxious horse or a head tosser. But that bit looks much more stable and would be more like a Western grazing curb but allow you to use one rein at a time for signals.

The curved shanks will signal the horse and give them a chance to respond before the curb kicks in, so that's nice. It appears thin enough to be comfortable and there is no high port to hit the palate. It is probably milder than many curbs. The curb action would be more clear to the horse with a curb strap on it.

You can use direct reining on any bit, of course. However, my bias is that when direct reining, the signals become less clear the longer the shanks are on a curb.

My bitting system is like Freia's, starting with the mildest and progressing up. If a horse was too strong in a Kimberwicke I would go to a very short shanked Pelham next for a little more leverage (have not run into that yet).

BSMS, I hope the Kimberwicke will work well with Mia. On my most excitable Arab I use it on the lower slot, but I keep the chain loose so it does not engage unless I pull back on the reins to a certain degree. That way I can keep a light contact with the reins, which my horse likes. But when we run into a herd of elk on the mountain and my mare wants to gallop home to be safe, the chain can be engaged and she will listen to it.

I have not used a Kimberwicke with an unbroken mouthpiece because the way I ride with the loose chain would make the bit a mullen mouth most of the time. A mullen mouth is milder than a double-jointed snaffle even, so too mild for my mare to pay attention even when she is not excited. Of course if you ride with a looser rein and keep the chain so it engages whenever the reins are taut, then your horse will be working off the curb all the time and the unbroken mouthpiece may work fine for you.

It just depends on whether you keep up a conversation with the bit, or whether you use it more for stop, go, and turn. Or if you use neck reining in the mix.

If you haven't used a Kimberwicke before, pay attention to whether the metal clasps on the end of the chain are poking your horse where they attach to the bit. I cover mine with electrical tape. Also, once you know how long you want your chain to be, make sure to close the ends. I've been on horses where one side of the chain flew off while galloping. It hits the horse in the face as well as making it difficult to stop. No, not my horses, and yes, more than once.
     
    01-09-2013, 08:03 PM
  #24
Trained
Are you saying the tom thumb causes head tossing or the Myler bit does?
     
    01-09-2013, 08:06 PM
  #25
Trained
Thank you for the advice. The chain is way long, but I'll get it adjusted, the attachments tight and covered. She's the only horse I'll be using it with. She listens quite well to leg cues and neck reins for turns. We spent a windy day in the arena today working on stop cues with a full cheek snaffle, and she does those great...when she isn't wound up!
     
    01-09-2013, 11:59 PM
  #26
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by gottatrot    
I didn't notice that the shanked bit was a Myler with the barrel middle rather than a broken middle such as is on a Tom Thumb. In my experience those are too unsteady in the mouth and will often create an anxious horse or a head tosser. But that bit looks much more stable and would be more like a Western grazing curb but allow you to use one rein at a time for signals.

The curved shanks will signal the horse and give them a chance to respond before the curb kicks in, so that's nice. It appears thin enough to be comfortable and there is no high port to hit the palate. It is probably milder than many curbs. The curb action would be more clear to the horse with a curb strap on it.

You can use direct reining on any bit, of course. However, my bias is that when direct reining, the signals become less clear the longer the shanks are on a curb.

My bitting system is like Freia's, starting with the mildest and progressing up. If a horse was too strong in a Kimberwicke I would go to a very short shanked Pelham next for a little more leverage (have not run into that yet).

BSMS, I hope the Kimberwicke will work well with Mia. On my most excitable Arab I use it on the lower slot, but I keep the chain loose so it does not engage unless I pull back on the reins to a certain degree. That way I can keep a light contact with the reins, which my horse likes. But when we run into a herd of elk on the mountain and my mare wants to gallop home to be safe, the chain can be engaged and she will listen to it.

I have not used a Kimberwicke with an unbroken mouthpiece because the way I ride with the loose chain would make the bit a mullen mouth most of the time. A mullen mouth is milder than a double-jointed snaffle even, so too mild for my mare to pay attention even when she is not excited. Of course if you ride with a looser rein and keep the chain so it engages whenever the reins are taut, then your horse will be working off the curb all the time and the unbroken mouthpiece may work fine for you.

It just depends on whether you keep up a conversation with the bit, or whether you use it more for stop, go, and turn. Or if you use neck reining in the mix.

If you haven't used a Kimberwicke before, pay attention to whether the metal clasps on the end of the chain are poking your horse where they attach to the bit. I cover mine with electrical tape. Also, once you know how long you want your chain to be, make sure to close the ends. I've been on horses where one side of the chain flew off while galloping. It hits the horse in the face as well as making it difficult to stop. No, not my horses, and yes, more than once.
Yes, the bit is a Myler and it is very stable. It doesn't move around at all when I put the bit in her mouth even....it just stays put and I slide it right into her mouth with a leather curb strap on it. Maybe it works with direct reining too since both sides of the bit move independently? I really like it so far though.

Kimberwick has been ordered on is on it's way. I'm curious to try it.
     

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