do you use a half-pad? **updated w. pics of my saddle
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Tack > Horse Tack and Equipment

do you use a half-pad? **updated w. pics of my saddle

This is a discussion on do you use a half-pad? **updated w. pics of my saddle within the Horse Tack and Equipment forums, part of the Horse Tack category
  • Half pad and fitted pad
  • What are half saddle pads used for?

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    02-14-2009, 11:18 PM
  #1
Started
do you use a half-pad? **updated w. pics of my saddle

I was wondering who uses half-pads (for English riding) and what success have you had with them? How do you know when you need to use one? I'm thinking that maybe I need a half-pad because I don't think my all-purpose pad is enough for my TB. She has shark-fin withers and I feel like its not enough padding. Lately I've been using my close contact (shaped) pad over the rectangular pad. Is this ok, or is it too much padding? How do you know when you are using too much padding?

Thanks guys!
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    02-15-2009, 12:41 AM
  #2
Trained
I use a half pad (along with a shaped pad) when I ride Gem. He's had a sore back in the past and I wanted him to be extra comfy.

The other two I either ride with a half pad or without it.

I'm sure Jub will let you know in some way that its too much padding (making it uncomfortable)
     
    02-15-2009, 01:51 AM
  #3
Yearling
I only use a half pad. I have a mattes pad and I love it... I should use something under it to keep it clean, but I never do.
     
    02-15-2009, 08:52 AM
  #4
Weanling
Half pads are generally used for comfort. Riser pads are used to keep the saddle elevated off the back so it is flat and even.

If your horse has a sensitive back then I would reccomend the Half pad over top of a regular quilted saddle pad. You can also use a pommel pad instead of the half pad to keep the saddle or surcingle when lunging from pressing down on the withers. If your horse does not need a half pad or riser pad for any reason, generally it is best if you just don't use one.

Hope this helps,
E
     
    02-15-2009, 10:21 AM
  #5
Yearling
I almost always use a half pad and also put a baby pad underneath to keep the half pad clean. It works well for me and provides just the right amount of padding without being too bulky. I would definitely suggest one for Jubilee as she has about the same build as my TB.
     
    02-15-2009, 11:22 AM
  #6
Trained
1/2 Pads were meant to add more horse to a saddle too wide.

I have a friend who is a Professional Saddle Fitter and Maker, who trained beside Schlese - she despises 1/2 pads and says that many 1/2 pads create more negative effects than positive.

She has gone to many clients - to find out their 1/2 pads were impeding, not aiding.

You can cause bridging, pinching and unbalance. You can cause compacted back muscles, you can other issues.

Just be sure you have someone with enough knowledge and experience to help you with this, before you make any decisions.

With a saddle that already fits - and adding a 1/2 pad to that - ouch, poor horse. That is adding more bulk undernieth the already fitting saddle.

After a good ride, look at the sweat marks on your saddle pad. See what is going on.



I have a TB with an A symetrical back shape, with shark fin withers. I used to use a regular quilted pad, and a wither relief 1/2 pad - I thought I was doing good - adding comfort to his already sensative back.

Until I had a professional Saddle Fitter/Maker come out to work with us - turns out that extra pad was causing bridging and more issues that had to be delt with down the road.

The spine has to be clear, first and foremost. And the muscles surrounding the spine. The back has to beable to lift and the muscles have to beable to breath and work.

You have to have a correctly fitted saddle as well - that is the part that should be corrected and fixed and assessed.

Learn how to read the sweat marks on your saddle pad.

With too much padding, you could be doing nothing good.

Every horse is shaped differently, every saddle make is different. 1/2 pads can help when needed, and 1/2 pads can also impede.
     
    02-15-2009, 12:18 PM
  #7
Showing
I completely agree with MIEventer.
Too many use half pads because it's the "cool" thing to do right now, and it makes a good-fitting saddle not fit... or a poor-fitting saddle fit worse.
I used a half-pad with Denny (and still do) because he has a narrow topline, and my saddle is just a teeeeny bit too wide at the moment; it will be a great fit when he's all muscled up. It just adds that little bit of padding until he has his own padding.
Now, when you have a saddle that fits correctly, the saddle pad should ONLY provide a barrier for sweat so your saddle doesn't absorb the moisture.
If your saddle is fitting incorrectly, it's time to invest in a new saddle.
Yep, it sucks... horses are not cheap.. haha.
If your saddle is a tiny bit wide, it's okay to use a half pad in most cases.... I would strongly suggest looking for a half pad with a spine-free channel, I.e. No sheepskin along the spine.
If your saddle fits well or is a little bit too narrow, do NOT use a half-pad. This will create a very snug fit and will definitely impede a horse's movement and comfort.
     
    02-16-2009, 09:00 AM
  #8
Started
Thanks everyone for your input! From the sounds of it, I think I have a little too much padding with both my quilted pad and close-contact.

Thanks again.
     
    02-16-2009, 11:44 AM
  #9
Green Broke
Shaped pad over a square pad used to be "in style" when I rode H/J back in the 90s in Southern California. Most girls would be riding in that combo in lessons or at schooling shows.

You want to make sure that your saddle is wide enough to accommodate all that padding. If the saddle "just fits" without any pad or with the quilted pad, then adding extra will actually make your horse less comfortable. Think about when you put on too thick of socks in dress shoes or cowboy boots. It's fine for a while, but then your feet begin to cramp up.

If you want something shock absorbing and cushioning that won't change your saddle fit, I'd HIGHLY recommend a ThinLine Half pad or Contour Pad. They do a great job of absorbing shock and reducing "bounce," making gaits a bit easier to sit. I really like the results of my ThinLine pad. And they have a guarantee, so if you don't love it, you can send it back for a refund of the purchase price (less shipping).

If your saddle is wide enough and you want to use a Sheepskin pad, I'd go with an Engel pad. They are very high quality without being so expensive. My daughter has one and it's held up well through many washings.
     
    02-16-2009, 03:31 PM
  #10
Started
Thanks luvstoride. I know that my saddle fits my horse, but I'm not sure if its too wide, or fits just about right. I'm pretty sure its a bit wider if anything, but how do I tell for sure?
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Updated Filly Pics! WSArabians Horse Pictures 10 05-16-2008 04:21 PM
Updated Colt pics... I could cry! WSArabians Horse Pictures 19 05-16-2008 04:08 PM
Stud Man **UPDATED** More Pics! FGRanch Horse Pictures 28 03-13-2008 10:50 AM
updated pics of my guys jazzyrider Horse Pictures 10 01-31-2008 04:49 PM
what do you guys think??? - UPDATED w Pics jazzyrider Horse Health 14 10-26-2007 06:14 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:19 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0