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Double twisted wire bit...

This is a discussion on Double twisted wire bit... within the Horse Tack and Equipment forums, part of the Horse Tack category
  • Are twisted wire bits crule?
  • Can a twisted wire bit be gentle

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    06-03-2010, 03:21 AM
  #21
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
I know people that ride in expensive rope halters that they call hackamores. They have awful horses and both are terribly unhappy.
Its so funny that you mention that....a woman at my barn uses a PP "hackamore"--a rope halter with reins attached to it--and her horse is just a bratty spoiled arab boy if their ever was one under saddle--dumped his rider multiple times for silly things, stops and goes when he feels like it, etc. The woman went on vacation and asked the BO's 13 year old to ride her horse for her...she slapped a snaffle in his mouth and BAM, perfect and respectable horse. The woman did not want to use a bit for whatever reasons she may have (although knowing this woman its because she didn't want to hurt him, that horse is like her child) but he turned out pretty good while wearing one.
     
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    06-03-2010, 08:42 AM
  #22
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
I don't own this type of bit but I wouldn't roll my eyes at anyone that did just because of this bit.
When it's absolutely last resort to deal with the horse, then probably yes. But if it's something just "to have more control" (the explanation I got in my case) and used on every horse then I'm sorry, that's NOT a good trainer.

And I agree with justsambam08, some people just use harsh bits to "control" the horse. Because it runs away, or bucks, or rears, or whatever other training issue in first place. Same thing with those mechanical hackamores and such total beginners are using (because it's "nice and gentle"). The worst thing when you try to comment you get a bad look. So I personally don't even try to comment anymore...
     
    06-03-2010, 10:58 AM
  #23
Green Broke
Don't encourage Kevin... He's the new "County" for anyone who's been around and remembers him from various forums, lol.
     
    06-03-2010, 11:56 AM
  #24
Showing
Yeah, I remember "county", he was fun to argue/discuss with though. As well as RD (who is on different forum now).
     
    06-03-2010, 12:01 PM
  #25
Super Moderator
True statement:

A bit is only as harsh as the hands holding the reins.
BlueMonday likes this.
     
    06-03-2010, 12:10 PM
  #26
Banned
I would take being compared to County as a compliment. Smart man who did not mince words just to make people feel better.
     
    06-03-2010, 12:42 PM
  #27
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevinshorses    
Or perhaps it is used by trainers that took on a horse that the owners had screwed up so badly trying to be the horses buddy that it takes a bit like that to get the horses attention.

Why does this bit have to be "harsh"? Why does "harsh" have to equal cruel?

I don't own this type of bit but I wouldn't roll my eyes at anyone that did just because of this bit.
The twisted wire bit is a lazy man's way of achieving something that a different technique or a little bit more time could accomplish.
I've ridden in a twisted wire bit, under a trainer's advice to "control" my out-of-hand 17.1hh gelding when I was much younger and didn't understand. The thought of it still makes me sick.


A bit is only as harsh as the hands behind it - TRUE - except that you HAVE to remember that when you're riding on contact at all, you've got a couple pounds of pressure on that bit. Any wire or harsher mouthpiece is going to cause discomfort as soon as contact is picked up.

     
    06-03-2010, 01:10 PM
  #28
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
you HAVE to remember that when you're riding on contact at all, you've got a couple pounds of pressure on that bit. Any wire or harsher mouthpiece is going to cause discomfort as soon as contact is picked up.

Good point. Might be off topic a bit, sorry OP, but one of the lessons my kids do occasionally is to 'ride' each other. One will put on the bridle over the top of their head, and squeeze the bit with their hands in front of their chest. The other will ride them, and over exagerate the other's faults (like if the horse-kid usually bounces hands, the rider-kid will bounce loudly, or if the horse-kid yanks sharply to stop, the rider-kid gives a hard yank to stop). This is an amazing tool, and teaches light hands very well. The pressure the bit applies to their hands is very real to them and they remember that when they're in the saddle. When they get sloppy every few months, they do this lesson again.
     
    06-03-2010, 02:57 PM
  #29
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
A bit is only as harsh as the hands behind it - TRUE - except that you HAVE to remember that when you're riding on contact at all, you've got a couple pounds of pressure on that bit. Any wire or harsher mouthpiece is going to cause discomfort as soon as contact is picked up.
Thank you, JDI! That's exactly the reason why I don't really like the statement. It's probably true on western horses who goes on loose rein most of the time, but I don't think it's all true when you have to keep a contact.
     
    06-03-2010, 03:33 PM
  #30
Green Broke
(as JDI mentioned) Snaffle bits are made to be ridden with contact on the reins (unless you're riding incorrectly with slack reins in a breed show hunter class...). There is no way to be gentle 100% of the time with a twisted wire snaffle bit, single or double, when you're riding with the correct amount of contact with the horse's mouth, period.

Using a twisted wire bit (or a corckscrew bit) is a lazy and uneducated way to put a bandaid on a larger issue.
     

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