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Draw Reins.

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  • Draw reins good or bad
  • Badly fitted draw reins

 
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    09-12-2009, 03:50 PM
  #11
Yearling
Draw reins and Running reins ( Draw reins are fitted between the legs - Running reins are fitted either side of the saddle )

In the correct hands they can be a good training aid BUT

Most people are not experienced enough to use them properly - in the wrong hands they can be the worst thing you could use. I have never used them and I never shall.

My point of view is that they teach the horse very little - in most cases if you give a horse something to fight against - that's what you will get, a fight.

If you are having trouble encouraging your horse to bring it's head down and need to resort to a piece of kit to do so - use a Market Harborough .
This will help bring the head down , when fitted correctly the downwards pressure will stop when the horse is in the correct position so a horse can learn that when a certain point is reached there is no more downwards pressure - you don't get this relief with draw reins.
The Market Harborough is out of fashion and is bad mouthed by a lot of people who don't know what they are talking about.
     
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    09-12-2009, 03:58 PM
  #12
Started
Jessabel-you mentioned only riding in draws as bad. My trainer recently suggest I use just the draws to help him bend to the right. Basically at the walk ask for 2 or 3 bends with light pressure on only the draws, then use the snaffle reins with no draw reins. In your opinion, would this be harmful at just the walk for a max of 5 minutes?
     
    09-12-2009, 04:15 PM
  #13
Trained
Quote:
Draw reins and Running reins ( Draw reins are fitted between the legs - Running reins are fitted either side of the saddle )

In the correct hands they can be a good training aid BUT

Most people are not experienced enough to use them properly - in the wrong hands they can be the worst thing you could use. I have never used them and I never shall.

My point of view is that they teach the horse very little - in most cases if you give a horse something to fight against - that's what you will get, a fight.

If you are having trouble encouraging your horse to bring it's head down and need to resort to a piece of kit to do so - use a Market Harborough .
This will help bring the head down , when fitted correctly the downwards pressure will stop when the horse is in the correct position so a horse can learn that when a certain point is reached there is no more downwards pressure - you don't get this relief with draw reins.
The Market Harborough is out of fashion and is bad mouthed by a lot of people who don't know what they are talking about.
Excellant post! I whole heartedly agree.
     
    09-12-2009, 06:01 PM
  #14
Weanling
I use them if my gelding starts to lean on my hands, he's in a kk training snaffle (double linked, lozenge) and he's quite good but can get strong, so everynow and then I give him a refresher with the draw reins.
Put it this way, he used to my n a pelham. If used corectly they are great
     
    09-13-2009, 07:30 AM
  #15
Foal
Quote:
Draw reins and Running reins ( Draw reins are fitted between the legs - Running reins are fitted either side of the saddle )

In the correct hands they can be a good training aid BUT

Most people are not experienced enough to use them properly - in the wrong hands they can be the worst thing you could use. I have never used them and I never shall.

My point of view is that they teach the horse very little - in most cases if you give a horse something to fight against - that's what you will get, a fight.

If you are having trouble encouraging your horse to bring it's head down and need to resort to a piece of kit to do so - use a Market Harborough .
This will help bring the head down , when fitted correctly the downwards pressure will stop when the horse is in the correct position so a horse can learn that when a certain point is reached there is no more downwards pressure - you don't get this relief with draw reins.
The Market Harborough is out of fashion and is bad mouthed by a lot of people who don't know what they are talking about.
I agree aswell, I have been schooling my warmblood in a market harborough, it has helped him so much - I was going to suggest this before when I said "what actually is it that you're aiming for because I have had experience with other training aids which I can recommend to you if I know what it is that you want to do ?" but Neon Zero said she wasn't aiming to do anything
neverminddd =]
     
    09-13-2009, 08:33 PM
  #16
Weanling
I have a hardheaded horse that does not like to stop at all,would draw reins be good for teaching her how to respond better?
     
    09-15-2009, 01:18 AM
  #17
Yearling
I would not reccomend draw reins
Draw reins would have very little effect on stopping a horse - you would probably find that you would be pulling too hard in an attempt to stop and the horses head would end up between its knees, you may end up in a rodeo session at this point as your horse would not like this .


The best way to get your horse to respond better is more schooling.

More tack or a stronger bit will only mask your problems, and when your horse has learned to evade the new piece of kit the problem will have been made worse not better.

Training aids should be used as training aids - not cures for problems
     
    09-15-2009, 01:59 PM
  #18
Foal
i understand what you're saying nutty saddler, but some horses do need stronger bit's . . . In an ideal world, every horse would be in a snaffle, I have an absolutely fabulous welsh section d who leaned on his bit when he had a snaffle and fought agains it and no amount of schooling changed that, we changed him into a kimblewick (as advised by our local saddlery, as kimblewick's are driving bits and therefore suit welsh cobs) and he prefer's that by miles - we changed him back into his snaffle, and he started leaning again, it was clear to us that he was happier in the kimblewick as he was always alert and ready to go and enjoyed every riding session

however you need to have gentle hands when you're using stronger bits, people often assume when people have stronger bit's they can't ride, have no control or pull their horses in the mouth - this isn't always the case, a horse that requires a strong bit in the right hands will be absolutely fine
     
    09-15-2009, 02:21 PM
  #19
Yearling
I don't like them at all, ever. How are you supposed to teach a horse to accept and take up the slack in the reins on his own if you're teaching him to back up off your hands and bend his nose when you grab?

All seems backwards to me.
     
    09-23-2009, 06:33 PM
  #20
Weanling
Youhave 2 reins and one is normal
     

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