Finding the best bit - The Horse Forum
 
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post #1 of 4 Old 02-26-2011, 10:22 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Medazzaland
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Question Finding the best bit

I've had some bit drama for the past few months. One instructor recommended a twisted wire bit which after some research, I discovered I was not going to buy that harsh bit. I borrowed a full cheek snaffle but it was too big for Dancer and turning is not really the problem. I've been told that french link is maybe the way to go. However, yesterday I talked to the vet and she really thinks the bit was not close enough to his teeth. Everyone I talked to told me go by the wrinkles on Dancer's face but the vet said some horses aren't very wrinkly and the best bet is to measure the distance between his teeth and the bit. (Apparently it was so far down that he probably was flipping his tongue over the bit) I did this today and noticed a completely different response. He was listening very well and sucking away at the bit. Here's my question: Should I continue using my eggbutt snaffle or should I go ahead and get the eggbutt frenchlink snaffle?
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post #2 of 4 Old 02-26-2011, 10:33 PM
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You don't really say what the problem is for you to warrant changing a bit...

This question has been done to death on every horse forum.

Whilst it is obviously in yours and your horse's interests to find the best bit, please bear in mind that 9 times out of 10, it's not the bit which is the problem, it's the rider.

Bits go in and out of fashion. In the 80's people had thick, fat bits. Fat snaffles, fat fulmers, fat happy-mouth bits etc....
The current "craze" (and I speak only for classical riding only as I don't know anything about Western) are the Myler bits.

Bit manufacturers promise you that if you use their bit on your horse you will get amazing results. Whether it's getting your horse on the bit, or flexing or control when jumping etc... The latest trendy bit assures you that it will work miracles.

If the bit in your horse's mouth appears to be too close to his teeth and there are not enough wrinkles in the corners of his mouth, then perhaps a simple adjustment would suffice.

I hope that you find the answer, because with all the hundreds of bits around, it is very confusing, even for the most knowledgeable expert!
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post #3 of 4 Old 02-26-2011, 10:37 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yoshi View Post
You don't really say what the problem is for you to warrant changing a bit...

This question has been done to death on every horse forum.

Whilst it is obviously in yours and your horse's interests to find the best bit, please bear in mind that 9 times out of 10, it's not the bit which is the problem, it's the rider.

Bits go in and out of fashion. In the 80's people had thick, fat bits. Fat snaffles, fat fulmers, fat happy-mouth bits etc....
The current "craze" (and I speak only for classical riding only as I don't know anything about Western) are the Myler bits.

Bit manufacturers promise you that if you use their bit on your horse you will get amazing results. Whether it's getting your horse on the bit, or flexing or control when jumping etc... The latest trendy bit assures you that it will work miracles.

If the bit in your horse's mouth appears to be too close to his teeth and there are not enough wrinkles in the corners of his mouth, then perhaps a simple adjustment would suffice.

I hope that you find the answer, because with all the hundreds of bits around, it is very confusing, even for the most knowledgeable expert!
Thank you for responding. My original problem was him not listening to the bit. I know a lot of it has to do with training on my part and his part. I just needed to find a mild bit that we can use during our training. I think the eggbutt snaffle will work but I don't know if I should try the eggbutt french link since it doesn't have the nutcracker effect. I really try (I'm advanced beginner) to have soft hands and not pull, yank, or tug on his mouth.
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post #4 of 4 Old 02-26-2011, 10:41 PM
Foal
 
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It's not easy, and I appreciate your dilemna!
First of all, why do you think that you need a mild bit? Even the mildest of bits can be harsh in the wrong hands, as you probably know.
I'm not suggesting that you shouldn't use a mild bit, but my point is, that if your horse isn't listening to you with the bit your using, then the bit probably isn't the problem.
Can you give examples of how your horse chooses to not listen to you?
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