head gear no metal in mouth reviews no slander
 
 

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head gear no metal in mouth reviews no slander

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  • Jim warner hackamore reviews

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    11-05-2011, 09:25 AM
  #1
Foal
head gear no metal in mouth reviews no slander

I wish I had the money and time to purchase all avaliable and give a honest opinion of sidepulls,hackamores,mec hackamores,Jaquimas,bosals,vosals based on my two current horses mares one yearling one 7year old broke but not what I call sweetbroke.
I want honest non political opinions and explanations of people who used the gear.
I feel in my research I have gone full circle and are turning into a hackamore person because it appears to me that it has the function I am looking for.
All advice on the difference in action of s shaped vs straight. If the hackamore is inferior for turns
     
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    11-05-2011, 12:33 PM
  #2
Banned
Not entirely certain what you're asking. Look at the bit link in my signature for an overview of some of the hackamore types, if that's what you're getting at.
     
    11-05-2011, 04:31 PM
  #3
Foal
Hi, and thanks for the awesome bit page you put together!
Hackamores I wonder the quick stop and turn advertised have a short shank and look different from the English hackamores then there are s turns and longer shanks but very different turns in shanks would like to get in to the action of them.Like some say s turns other use s as short for spanish so it gets confusing at times but if someone want to hold my hand and walk me tru the mecanical hackamores with no bit in mouth I would be very happy !
     
    11-05-2011, 04:53 PM
  #4
Green Broke
If you're looking for Bitless reviews -- happiness depends on the horse.

I have a TWH and an Arab that both wear Mechanical Hackamores because that's what they're happy with. My other two TWH's wear low port curb bits because that's what they're happy with.

I also had a TWH that was thrilled to wear a Dr. Cook's Bitless but none of the others in my pasture appreciated it.

Bitless bridles are just like using a bit in that they put pressure on the horse SOMEWHERE to respond to the rider. They take light hands as there can be physical damage to the horse's face if the rider gets to yanking and jerking the bitless types around.

They are not a panacea for "natural horsemanship". They are merely a different means to control horse provided the horse is happy with the arrangement
Tianimalz likes this.
     
    11-05-2011, 05:14 PM
  #5
Yearling
I use a little s hackamore and like it very well. I posted a thread trying to show the action it has by putting different angles of rein pressure on it.

My Little S Bit (Hackamore)

Many, if not most, 'mechanical' hackamores have a hinge of some sort on them where the shanks meet the noseband. The little S and a few others do not have such a hinge, that is why I feel they are milder than most.
     
    11-05-2011, 05:29 PM
  #6
Foal
If the shank is short and s shaped ,if the shank is 5inch like english and curbes backward,then there are shanks that have a drawn out shape and turn to them even found a US patent on a hackamore designed to only use the noseband pressure dissengaging the strap with the use of 2 chinstraps and a andgle of the shank itself..
     
    11-05-2011, 05:42 PM
  #7
Foal
Hackamore bridle here is the other type of shanked hackamore
     
    11-05-2011, 06:41 PM
  #8
Foal
Jim Warner Hackamore Bit Barrel Racing Trail Horse Tack | eBay
ONE
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=160624953021
TWO
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=220796153266
Tree

Here are some pictures that do not even show the english type or the longer shanks with different turns and angles I remember from ages ago someont told me no matter the curves the leveraje in the bit is the length I am ok with that explanation just interested in theturns providing specific delay action or smothness or is the bends merly decorative on longer shanks...
     
    11-05-2011, 07:43 PM
  #9
Trained
Any young horse I have started in the last 30 years or so has been in a bosal. Learned how to use it at a clinic, very useful tool.
     
    11-05-2011, 08:09 PM
  #10
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by northswedish    
Hackamore bridle here is the other type of shanked hackamore
I have never seen something like this employed. It looks very harsh and ineffective, however. I would not use such a thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by northswedish    
The Jim Warner is harsh, due partial to the joint anndankev was talking about, and with shank to purchase ratios, it's probably a fivefold pressure magnifier. However, it is effective and gives clear signals. You see it a lot in barrel racing. The rope noseband is also abrasive and can cause sores even with relatively soft hands. Best to wrap it in Sealtex rubber.

This is my favorite type of mechanical hackamore; the leather-nose Little S (referring to the shape of the shanks). It's fairly mild and can be used for direct reining with a sidepull-like action.

The Stop and Turn is a piece of crap. Very harsh. Doesn't have a true curb, just a nasty straight bar to slam against the jawbone while the rope noseband cuts into the face.

Quote:
here are some pictures that do not even show the english type or the longer shanks with different turns and angles I remember from ages ago someont told me no matter the curves the leveraje in the bit is the length I am ok with that explanation just interested in theturns providing specific delay action or smothness or is the bends merly decorative on longer shanks...
The length of shank itself is not what gives leverage power. It's the ratio of the shank to the purchase (in a bit, the parts below versus above the mouthpiece). So if you have a six-inch shank and a two-inch purchase, that's a 6:2 or 3:1 ratio, meaning a 3X magnification. To be honest, I am not entirely certain how shank curvature affects this balance. Curved shanks definitely remove some of the severity when swept back so that the rein attachment is behind the mouthpiece. This also changes the speed of action. But vertical distance, I believe, is still the determining factor in leverage increase.
     

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