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Hoof Boot Question

This is a discussion on Hoof Boot Question within the Horse Tack and Equipment forums, part of the Horse Tack category
  • What is a good hoof boot that will not collect debri
  • Overtighten easyboot

 
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    03-18-2009, 10:43 AM
  #11
Weanling
I'd only be using them until his front hooves regain concavity. I wouldn't be leaving them on like overnight or anything either, just while riding over rough terrain for a while.

Kitten_Val: I heard Easyboot Bares were harder to get on than most, is that true?
     
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    03-18-2009, 02:31 PM
  #12
Showing
Well... Actually, not. Friend of mine shown me all possible boots (Old Macs, Boas, Cavallos, Epics and Bares) so I'd make my choice what I want to buy and Epics and Bares took much less time than Old Macs and Boas.

As for Epic versus Bare it's harder to put Bares on for the first 5-10 times, and then it's faster actually (because you don't have to deal with clip). Problems with Epics is that first, wire gets broke at some point, so you have to change it, and second, clip may get loose (and that happened first time I used easyboots my friend borrowed me to try). However for Epics you have more freedom to make them more loose or more tight: bares have just 3 positions. That's exactly why I got Epics for my 2nd horse.

It's really a matter of taste and I prefer bares: just slide them on and here we go. I know some people complain about how hard to put them on, and if you follow easyboot company recommendations it's indeed VERY hard: took me about 40 mins. However friend of mine (using easyboot for ages) laughed to death when he saw how I do it. The trick is you pull the leg forward (like you want to rasp off the walls) and then just slide the boot on (like you put own boots), and then pull gator up, so it would be flat and wrap it around the leg. Takes several mins in beginning, but takes me 30 secs after I got used to it.
     
    03-18-2009, 08:40 PM
  #13
Showing
On the Easycare web site they sell a fit kit for the easyboot Gloves for $8.50
I wish they sold those for all the boots. Getting a good fit is really important. They do have a pretty cool calculator now that should help a bunch. Much better than the old way of measuring and pouring over charts.
     
    03-22-2009, 02:16 PM
  #14
Started
I have some of the old style easy boots and they were very notorious for coming off at a lope. Grrr. I now use Boa's and love them. I ride in the flinthills on my 16h Qh, Abe and he does great in them(fronts only) with a pad I cut from matting bought at walmart. Way cheaper and denser than what the boot companys sell. Without any pad in the boot he can be a tad touchy on some footing, so I'd say they can toughen some with them on. IMO no horse should have hoof pain *while you ride or not* in order to toughen up. It's all in getting the hoof healthy first, then go barefoot.

I would go to the easycare site and check out all their boots. See which styles work best for different shaped hooves and where you ride as well. Then make your decision.. I know people who use the Old macs and Old mac G2's(dif shape) and love them.. And some who love the easyboot bare, epics, etc.. I think dif boots simply work better for dif horses.
     
    03-22-2009, 05:56 PM
  #15
Weanling
I can only speak to Easy Boot Epics, which we used while trying to transition a horse from shoes to barefoot. The boots were "fitted" by a trimmer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ne0n Zero    
-Does mud and gravel get in them and if so does it irritate the horse?
Yes, although it is not that bad. You have to ride through some bad stuff for an extended period for it to get bad enough to irritate/cause a problem.

Quote:
-Have any of your horses ever lost one while galloping or riding through deep mud?
Yes. That and the breaking is why I gave up on them. Never came off due to mud (as long as they were fitted correctly) but would break off on dry ground at faster gaits.

Quote:
-Do they break easily?
Yes - all I had to do was lope through a particular field for 100yards and I could almost guarantee a break.

Quote:
-Can your horse's feet still toughen up through them?
Don't know. It didn't help for my horse, but I don't believe that boots had anything to do with toughness in my situation.


Quote:
-Is it true that they have good grip?
Grip was fine. Different boots have different treads and grip properties. The Epics worked very will for me on a variety of terrain. You can also put studs in them for better traction.
     
    03-23-2009, 11:45 AM
  #16
Weanling
Taz, if you had that much trouble with breakage, you had a size too small or were really over tightening them.

AppyT, Abe might be ouchy without pads since a plain boot has a flat surface on the inside and he would be periphial loading, so dense pads would actually help more to build sole than boots alone.

To the OP, basically, if you just want to do some easy trail riding and easy application, any boot that comes above the hairline will do. They are generally easier on/off, but tend to be clunkier and more apt to get debris in them. OF course you can get wraps that help prevent rubbing, but if you really plan to do very athletic maneuvers, I would get something that fits below the hairline and has a pastern wrap. Less debris enters, no rubbing, and really, the cable systems don't usually break that easily unless you overtighten or they are worn out from use. You can put pads in any boot, and I highly recommend doing so, as it does help stimulate the soles. Besides Easy Care, there is a type of boot called Renegades that are pretty easy on/off and it's fairly open and allows dirt/gravel to come out as well as mud. They seem to wear a little faster than easyboots, but they are a good boot just the same. They also have more options in colors.

Almost no boot is recommeded for continuous wear in turnout. In certain situations, such as acute laminitis, it's better than letting the horse limp around, but you still have to take them off to let the hoof air out, and check for rubbing. Thrush will start to develop if left on 24/7. In a case of laminitis, or any time I would advise someone to use the boots for turnout, it's a short term basis. They are fine if you leave them on for a whole day to ride in, just take them off when you are done for the day.
When they are new and it's hard to get them on, put some baby powder in them, it helps some. Once they've been on/off a few times, it gets easier. For drainage issues, if you plan to ride through much water, you can drill small holes in the sole (usually voids the warranty, so be sure you want to keep the boots) or make existing holes bigger so water can escape quicker.

For sizing, it's better to have a slightly larger than too small size if your horse is one of those "in betweens" . Too small contricts the foot and the boot will break down faster. A little big and you can add a thicker pad help snug it down.
     
    03-23-2009, 01:06 PM
  #17
Showing
Oooo those Renegade's look cool. I may have to have a back up pair
     
    03-23-2009, 03:36 PM
  #18
Weanling
My only gripe with Renegades is that a hoof pad would come out without adhesive, which makes the pad a b**** to get out when it's worn. But the open back makes drainage and dirt build up a non-issue.
     

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