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That is INHUMANE!

This is a discussion on That is INHUMANE! within the Horse Tack and Equipment forums, part of the Horse Tack category
  • Horse bit is rusty and plating is coming off
  • Inhumane western pleasure trainers

 
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    03-13-2008, 09:12 AM
  #41
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt
Quote:
Originally Posted by appylover31803
that was an amazing video!

The movements just blew me away. And I loved the swishing tail. Almost made it look like that's what made the horse move.
Isn't it gorgeous? That's my all-time fave dressage video. Stunning. Too bad they didn't win.
mine too I think that's about the 22000th time I've watched it lol and I love blu hors matine. She's a trakehner isnt she?
     
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    03-13-2008, 09:24 AM
  #42
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by spmoonie
It makes me sick. How could someone mistreat such a wonderful animal like that?????? I Have even seen bike chains used as bits..... and then I found one in my local tackshop. I would have burned it if I could!
Many of it isn't mistreatment. Its only as bad as you make it out to be.
     
    03-13-2008, 01:27 PM
  #43
Weanling
I think it was utterly wrong that blu hors matine didn't win. Anky's horse (as always) looked tense and uncomfortable and Anky (as always) used too much hand and can't keep her legs stable! 'quiet seat', yeah right...I'd never call myself a great rider but my leg doesn't flop about as much as hers.

Sorry, I just cannot stand Anky's riding. It's the 'yank, crank and spank' version of dressage and it's what makes people hate the sport. I hate that she's so fashionable.
     
    03-13-2008, 01:28 PM
  #44
Foal
Ick, I would NEVER use a rusty bit like that! Most of them aren't bad bits, if used properly. I would never use that chainsaw bit though, there's no reason for something like that :(
     
    03-14-2008, 09:34 PM
  #45
Foal
bits

I rode a horse today and the man showed us his show bit and it was wrapped with vet tape! The bit was like two chains across and he taped them to keep from pinching the horse. He is a professional, why not just buy a new one that was less aggressive!
     
    03-25-2008, 10:33 AM
  #46
Foal
~~~~well now this discussion will be fair. Since the owner of the nasty, old rusty bits has arrived.



[b]~~~~~~~First of all “ladies”, I don’t appreciate being talked about in a negative way on a public forum, especially without being invited to at least defend myself.

~~~~~Also, don’t be so quick to judge – one man’s trash is another man’s treasure.

"Bits are sold as is. Prices on bits are not firm. Offers are considered. I will be adding more bits later. If you don't see what you want here email me and I may have it."
(as taken off my website with my permission)


**Let me offer this piece of “Cowboy Logic”
It's better to keep your mouth shut and let them think you're stupid, rather than open your mouth, and prove it......



**Oh and one more thing you can turn that MULE bit around and it is no longer a MULE bit!!!


**It is a tool, and like all tools, it can be useful with KNOWLEDGE AND KNOWHOW, KNOWWHEN and KNOWWHEN NOT!!!! A tool can also be dangerous in the wrong hands. Do you use spurs? A riding crop? A twitch? These can also be dangerous or helpful tools……..

****And if you all feel so adamant then buy these nasty, inhumane, rusty old bits from me and keep them from being used on any horses!! I will cut you a group deal!!! Put your money where your mouth is….


Now open your minds and be informed!!! I have supplied you with lots of information……

www.culturedcowboy.com/bits

CULTURED COWBOY PRESENTS
Introduction to Bits
________________________________________
Why buy a good bit.
Scared to try try something new?
Imagine a monkey perched on your back with two cords tied to a rusty screwdriver stuck between your teeth. Chrome plated bits, like screwdrivers, will rust and chrome plating will chip off inside a horses mouth. These bits, though inexpensive, will cost you time and ease of riding. Even if your horse performs acceptably with a chrome bit, imagine what could be accomplished if the horse was more comfortable.
The bit is a critical point of contact between horse and rider. For best results, it should taste OK and have no rough surfaces on the mouthpiece. The bit should be felt by the horse for direction from the rider, without hampering the desired performance of the horse.
Stainless steel will not chip or pit, has very little taste. Sweet or black iron will rust a little for a sweet taste, but will not chip. Copper tastes sweet; causing a horse's mouth to salivate, which allows the mouth to stay soft and usable to the rider. But, there are questions about the use of copper with pregnant mares. Rubber is the softest, is not very tasty at first, but taste improves with use.
A rider should begin with bits of lesser severity and gradually use bits of greater leverage and contact until one is found to control the horse with the least possible discipline in his mouth.
A snaffle bit is a bit designed to be used with direct contact from the rider. Reins attach directly to mouthpiece ( no shanks). Snaffles may have broken or solid mouthpieces.

A curb bit uses leverage contact from the rider. Reins attach to a point on a side shank, lower than the mouthpiece. Curb bits work best with a curb strap or chain attached. Curb bits may have solid or broken mouthpieces. Curb chain pressure varies from one bit to another. It sets the timing of a bit. Loose curb chain - slow timing. Tight curb chain - faster timing. Curb action includes pressure on poll.
Bosals and mechanical hackamores work on the nose and curb of the horse. Bosals use a direct contact like a snaffle. Mechanical hacks use leveraged contact.
• Cheeks are the sides of the bit. (Includes both purchase and shank)
• Purchase is the part of the bit above the mouthpiece. With a long purchase, the bit will act quicker in a horse's mouth when the rider pulls the reins. With a shorter purchase, the bit is slower to react
Shank is the part of the bit below the mouthpiece. It will give you leverage on the mouthpiece. The shorter the shank, the less control - the longer the shank, the more control.
Mouthpiece is the part of the bit that goes in the horse's mouth.
Types of mouthpieces are:
1. Snaffle- broken in the middle and one of the most common mouthpieces.
2. Three-Piece Snaffle- broken in two places so as to work more on the outside corners of the bars and add some tongue pressure.
3. Double Twisted Iron Snaffle- made up of two small snaffles which are broken off-center from each other
4. Chain Mouthpiece- works lightly on the bars, corners of the lips while adding some tongue pressure.
5. Solid Mouthpiece- any mouthpiece that is not broken.
Bars are the portion of each side of the mouthpiece that rests on the horse's bars (gum area between front and back teeth)

Port is the center portion of the mouthpiece. Both the height and width are important in creating the amount of tongue pressure or tongue relief
Mullen Relief is a forward curve added to the mouthpiece that gives even pressure across the bars and tongue.
Timing is the amount of time required from the point when the reins are pulled until the bit has done as much as it can do.
The "Feel of the Bit" is not only what the horse feels when the rider pulls on the reins, but, also what the rider feels, for example, suppleness or stiffness.
Poll is the top of the head behind the ears joining the neck


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bit_mouthpiece
You can access this whole article at the above link but this is what I wanted highlighted…….

Mouthpiece Material


A sweet iron mouthpiece with copper inlay, designed to encourage salivation and a soft mouth

Stainless steel: The most popular material for bits. It is strong, easy to clean, and doesn't rust. It is considered to be a "cold" metal that does not encourage or discourage salivation.

Copper: Warms up quickly, but does not last as long as stainless steel. It is supposed to encourage the horse to salivate and accept the bit. There are some people who refuse to use copper bits because they believe them to be distasteful, and that to be the reason why some horses chew them so readily. Because these bits wear out fairly quickly, they should be checked regularly to make sure they are maintaining their integrity.
Copper alloy: by combining copper with a harder metal, the bit lasts longer.
Sweet iron: easily rusts, which supposedly encourages salivation from the horse and acceptance of the bit. This metal is used in many Western riding disciplines, and is not as popular in the English.
Brass alloy: combination of brass, silicon, and aluminum. Is said to have some of the same qualities as copper, but is cheaper.
Rubber: softens the action of the bit. All rubber bits are very gentle, but are easily chewed and destroyed. Bits that add rubber to an underlying metal mouthpiece last longer, but the rubber must be periodically replaced. A waterproof bandage product called Sealtex is often used to add rubber to a metal bit.
Aluminum: Considered a very bad choice for a mothpiece as it tends to dry out the mouth and may be toxic. Occasionally seen in very cheap western-style bits. To be avoided.
Synthetics: Any number of tough plastics are used for bit designs, combining the softness of rubber with more durability. The best are not easily destroyed by chewing.

To be fair I am including the Wikipedia definition of the “Chain Saw Bit”
The Saw Chain Mouth Types of bits: snaffle
What it is: As the name suggests, the mouthpiece is made out of a piece of chainsaw.
Uses: Extremely severe, and quite uncommon. The majority of trainers will not use such a bit. Note: due to the extreme severity, most equestrian organizations would not permit this bit in competition.


~~~~~~~~~~~~And Tim this is for you buddy ………Maybe these keyboard equestrians will respond more positively to Wikipedia explanation

Mouthpiece Thickness
A standard mouthpiece is 3/8 inch in diameter, measured one inch out from the bit rings (the area that usually come in contact with the bars). The common belief is that a thinner mouthpiece increases the severity of the bit, because it decreases the bearing surface and makes the bit "sharper." However, up to a point, some horses perform better with a thinner mouthpiece to a thicker one because there is less metal in their mouth and therefore more room for the tongue. This is mostly true if the rider has soft hands. Thinner mouthpieces are also preferable when using a double bridle, as the horse has even less room for its tongue with two bits in his mouth.
On the other hand, very thin bits (such as the twisted wire bits) have a marked severity over thicker bits. Some wire bits may come in a thickness as low as 1/16 inch, making them extremely severe to the point where it is easy for any rider to cut and ruin the horse's mouth, especially the lips. Many horsemen, even the most skilled riders, will not put such a harsh bit in their horse's mouths. Many equestrian organizations do not allow a bit to be 1/4 inch or thinner in diameter.
If the rider gives crude aids, it is generally best to pick a bit mouthpiece that is thicker. This may also be true with some horses with relatively thin bars, such as some Thoroughbreds.
I tell you what I will copy and paste the ENTIRE Wikipedia Section on Bits - now once you read this (and ride, oh say, A LOT of DIFFERENT horses) – you will be informed.
Bit mouthpiece From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about about the part of a bit that goes into the mouth of a horse. For an overview of bits in general, see Bit (horse). For types of bridles, see Bridle.


Single-jointed pelham.
The mouthpiece is the part of a horse's bit that goes into the mouth of a horse, resting on the bars of the mouth in the sensitive interdental space where there are no teeth. The mouthpiece is possibly the most important determinant in the severity and action of the bit. Therefore, it should be carefully considered when choosing a bit for a horse. Some mouthpieces are not allowed in dressage competition.

The other parts of the bit are the bit rings on a snaffle bit, and the shanks on a curb bit. These pieces do not go inside the mouth, but rather are the parts of a bit that are outside the mouth, where the bridle and reins attach.

Particular mouthpieces do not make a bit a snaffle, pelham, kimberwicke, curb, or gag bit. Often, bits with "soft" mouthpieces, such as the single- or double-jointed, are incorrectly referred to as snaffles. Although some mouthpieces are marked as "severe" and others as "mild," this is all relative. A hard-handed rider can make even the mildest bit uncomfortable, and a skilled, light rider can ride in a much harsher mouthpiece without damaging the mouth or causing any distress in the horse. Additionally, the type of bit has a great impact on the action of the mouthpiece. Snaffles are generally considered the mildest, curbs and gags the harshest. It is difficult, therefore, to compare a harsher-type bit with a mild mouthpiece (such as a pelham with a rubber mullen mouth), and a milder-type bit with a harsher mouthpiece (like a snaffle with a slow twist).

In general, however, the mouthpiece can have a marked difference on the severity. Snaffles with twisted wires are never considered mild, while a pelham with a low port may. In short, there are many factors in the bitting equation which must be considered to get a true estimate of the action and severity of a bit.


The rider's use of their hands is one of the most important factors when determining the severity of the bit

Contents
[hide]
1 Bits without Joints
1.1 Straight-bar and Mullen mouth
1.2 Ported
2 Jointed/Single-jointed
3 Double Jointed Bits
3.1 The French Mouth/ French Link
3.2 The Dr. Bristol
3.3 The Ball Joint
3.4 The Ported Link
3.5 The Broken Segunda
4 Multi-jointed Bits
4.1 Waterford
4.2 Chain mouth
5 Twisted/Serrated Bits
5.1 Slow Twist
5.2 Corkscrew
5.3 Single Twisted Wire
5.4 The Double Twisted Wire
5.5 The Saw Chain Mouth
6 The Double-Mouth/Scissors/"W" or "Y" Mouth
7 Hollow Mouth
8 Roller bits
8.1 The Cricket, Cherry Roller and other Roller bits
8.2 The Magenis
9 Key bit
10 Tongue bit/Tongue Correction bit/Tongue port
11 Mouthpiece Thickness
12 Mouthpiece Material
13 See also
14 References and external links

[edit] Bits without Joints
[edit] Straight-bar and Mullen mouth


Straight bar mouthpiece
Types of Bits: All types.

What it is: The mouthpiece is a straight bar of material, without any joints or ports. In the mullen mouth, the bar has a slight bow to it, curving gently to allow some room for the tongue.

Action: The mullen mouth and straight bar are fairly similar in action, placing pressure on the tongue, lips, and bars. The mullen provides extra space for the tongue, instead of constantly pushing into it, resulting in more tongue relief, and making it more comfortable, but the mullen does not have as high of a port as a curb, thus does not offer full tongue relief. This bit is generally considered a very mild mouthpiece, although this varies according to the type of bit leverage (snaffle, pelham or curb), and improper use may make it harsh, since the majority of the bit pressure will be applied on the sensitive tongue.

Materials: Rubber is very common, as are other synthetic materials. Stainless steel is also a favorite, but copper and sweet iron are not as popular.

Uses: Seen in all equestrian activities, although less commonly in dressage. Usually not as popular for snaffles or gags as for bits that use leverage (pelham, kimberwick, and curb). The straight bar is common in stallion in-hand bits.

Variants: A variant that is somewhat between the mullen and a low port, seen primarily in western riding is called a "sweetwater" bit and is a very wide, low port slightly more arched than a mullen that offers full tongue relief, puts pressure only on the bars, and is primarily used as a curb mouthpiece. Spade and "half-breed bits also have a straight bar mouthpiece, but with the addition of a port, spoon, or other accoutrements, and thus are not truly classified as a mullen or straight bar mouthpiece.
[edit]

Ported

A medium-height port on a curb bit, offering room for the tongue without acting on the hard palate.

Types of Bits: All types, including driving bits.

What it is: The middle of the mouthpiece has a "port," or curve, which may vary in size from "low" to "high." The port is different from the mullen mouth in that the curved portion does not extend the width of the mouthpiece, but is only an inch or two in the center of the bar.

Action: Ported bits act on the lips, tongue, and roof of the mouth, and may apply extra pressure to the bars. The action of the port is directly related to its size. Low ports provide some tongue relief, similar to the mullen mouth, as they provide more space. Larger ports will press on the hard palate (roof of the mouth) when the reins are pulled, act as a fulcrum, and transfer that pressure onto the bars. Recent research has shown that the port must be 2-2.5" (5–6 cm) or more in height before it will touch the hard palate. Thus the mildest port height is not necessarily the lowest ported bit, as commonly believed; it can also be the highest port possible that will not come in contact with the hard palate.

Materials: Always metal, often stainless steel but also may be sweet iron or copper.

Uses: Very uncommon in snaffles and gags (although it can be found). One of the most common mouthpieces in pelhams, kimberwickes, and curbs. Very popular in the Western disciplines.
[edit]

Jointed/Single-jointed

Single-jointed pelham.


Single-jointed snaffle, mouthpiece wrapped in rubber to make it milder

Type of Bits: Very common on snaffles, but seen on all bit families including kimberwickes, pelhams, gags, and curbs.

What it is: The mouthpiece has one joint in its center. It "breaks" upward toward the top of the mouth with direct pressure, and outward toward the front of the mouth when used with leverage pressure from a bit shank.

Action: The single-jointed mouthpiece applies pressure to the tongue, lips, and bars. Due to the V-shape of the bit when the mouthpiece is contracted, it causes a "nutcracker" action, which has a pinching effect on the bars. It also causes the joint of the bit to push into the sensitive roof of the mouth if used harshly. A single-jointed bit with a curved mouthpiece has a more "U" shape tends to decrease the pressure on the roof of the mouth.

Materials: often stainless steel, but may be made of any bit metal (copper and sweet iron are both popular), happy mouth material, or have a rubber covering on each joint.

Uses: This is one of the most common mouthpieces found on a snaffle, and is popular for all equestrian sports.

Cautions: Curb bits with a single joint are often called cowboy snaffle, Argentine snaffle, or Tom Thumb snaffle. However, these bits all are actually curb bits because they have shanks and operate with leverage. Thus, when the reins are pulled, the horse is subjected both to the nutcracker action of the jointed mouthpiece and the leverage of the curb, which also causes the jointed bit to rotate and press into the tongue. Therefore, such bits can be very harsh, particularly in the hands of an inexperienced rider. Adding a solid "slobber bar at the end of the shanks may reduce, but does not eliminate, this problem.
[edit]

Double Jointed Bits
Double-jointed bits reduce the nutcracker effect because they conform better to the horse's "U" shaped mouth, instead of the "V" created by a single joint. In this respect they are milder, and many horses prefer a double-joint over a single joint.

Many of the double-jointed bits (especially the French link and Dr. Bristol) are occasionally "added to" by twisting the cannons of the mouthpiece. This greatly increases the severity of the bit, as these cannons act directly on the tongue and bars in addition to the regular action of the bit. A relatively "kind" French mouth can therefore be turned into a severe bit when the cannons are twisted or if the mouthpiece is put onto a gag bit. All references below are based on the cannons being smooth, not twisted.
[edit]

The French Mouth/ French Link

A French Link mouthpiece

Types of Bits: snaffle, gag, pelham, curb (including driving bits)

What it is: The mouthpiece has two joints due to a central link. This link is flat, short and has bone-shaped, rounded corners. Some French link snaffles are not flat, but are rounded in the same manner as the rest of the mouthpiece.

Action: One of the mildest mouthpieces, the two joints reduces the nutcracker effect which is found in single-jointed bits, and encourage relaxation. Applies pressure to the lips, tongue, and bars of the mouth.

Materials: Usually stainless steel, also copper (either just the link or the whole bit).

Use: Commonly seen on snaffles, rather rare in gags, pelhams, or curbs. This is one of the most popular mouthpieces for dressage work. However, it is used in many English-styled disciplines. It is rarely used in the Western-styled disciplines.
[edit]

The Dr. Bristol

A Dr. Bristol link is flat, but set at an angle when compared to a French Link. This bit also has a slow twist to add to the severity.

Types of Bits: snaffle, gag

What it is: The mouthpiece has two joints due to a central link. This link is flat, but longer and more rectangular in shape than a French link. It is also usually set at a slight angle to the plane of the bit.

Action: The double joint reduces the nutcracker effect found in single-jointed snaffles. However, the middle link is angled relative to the side pieces of the bit. Typically this means that the thin edge of the rectangle presses into the tongue, creating a very small bearing surface. When a full-cheek Dr. Bristol is used, however, the bit can be rotated so that the angled middle joint lies flat with its broad side against the tongue; when used this way the bit is relatively mild. This latter method is only possible because bit keepers ensure the bit stays in a fixed position in the horse's mouth, and thus bits that do not use bit keepers (e.g., a D-ring or eggbutt) do not have this milder option.
This bit can put pressure on the tongue, although it also adds pressure to the bars and lips of the mouth.

Materials: Usually stainless steel, also copper.

Use: Commonly seen on snaffles, very rare in gags. This bit is seen in many of the English disciplines, but is very uncommon in Western disciplines. Not as common in dressage due to its potential severity, although it is permitted. Seen in many jumping disciplines.
[edit]

The Ball Joint

The ball joint

Types of Bits: snaffle

What it is: Similar to the French-link, except there is a round "ball" on the middle link.

Action: double joint reduces the nutcracker effect. The ball tends to concentrate pressure on the tongue. More severe than the French link, less than the Dr. Bristol. Also applies pressure to the lips and bars of the mouth.

Materials: Usually stainless steel

Use: Rather rare type of mouthpiece, seen in the English disciplines. Permitted in dressage.
[edit]

The Ported Link

Types of bits: snaffles

What it is: Double jointed bit similar to a French link, except the middle link has a slight upward (toward the roof of the mouth) curve, like a port.

Action: Similar action as French link, but possibly provides more room for the tongue.
[edit]

The Broken Segunda

Types of Bits: snaffles, usually with a Dee-ring

What it is: Similar to the ported link, except the middle link is much higher and makes a clear upside-down "U".

Action: Supposed to encourage the horse to soften and stay light in the bridle. The bottom of the "U" can be quite sharp, however, and can dig into the tongue to the point of cutting it. Therefore, they are best left to skilled riders with a very light contact.
[edit]

Multi-jointed Bits

Bits with more than two joints tend to wrap around the lower jaw of the horse. In general, they are considered more severe than double-jointed bits. These bits are not permitted in dressage.
[edit]

Waterford

Type of Bits: snaffle, pelham, gag, curb

What it is: The mouthpiece is made of 5-9 joints and is very flexible.

Action: Due to the many joints, the waterford has many bumps, which can act as pressure points. The idea is that the great flexibility will discourage the horse from leaning on it.

Materials: Stainless steel.

Uses: Most common in the English disciplines, especially show jumping and eventing. Used mainly on strong horses. Not permitted in dressage, not commonly used in hunt seat riding. Rather rare in a pelham, very rare in a curb bit.
[edit]

Chain mouth

Types of bits: gag, curb

What it is: As its name suggests, this mouthpiece is several links of chain.

Uses: Seen in the Western disciplines. Note: There are some chain bits made of bicycle chain rather than link chain. These bits are considered by most horsemen to be too severe for use and many categorize them as cruel. These bits are not allowed in competition.
[edit]

Twisted/Serrated Bits

All twisted mouthpieces are considered more severe than smooth mouthpieces. In general, they are not appropriate for novice riders or those with harsh or unskilled hands. Neither these nor any bits should be used to the point where they cause bleeding of the horse's mouth.

If a rider believes such a bit would benefit his horse, he should first look at the animal's training and his own skills. Many problems can be resolved through proper training, rather than harsher bitting. Usually, it is the less-skilled riders who find the need to use harsher bits, because they can't control their horses in anything else.
That being said, there are cases in which skilled riders can use such bits to their advantage, and improve the horse's training. These bits are NOT permitted in dressage competition, and are generally not used for schooling dressage horses.
[edit]

Slow Twist

The slow twist is thicker than the twisted wire bits

Types of Bits: Snaffle, pelham, gag

What it is: A mouthpiece (usually single-jointed) with a slight twist in the cannons. Thicker and with fewer twists than a wire bit, has fewer edges than a corkscrew.

Action: The twist causes edges that result as pressure points in the horse's mouth. Increases pressure on the tongue and bars, also acts on the lips. Generally considered strong and fairly severe.

Materials: Usually stainless steel

Uses: Most commonly found on snaffles, quite rare on pelhams and gags. Usually seen in English disciplines. Not permitted in dressage competition. Note: The slow twist is often incorrectly used to refer to the corkscrew or a wire bit. These bits are not the same.
[edit]

Corkscrew

Types of Bits: Snaffle, driving bits (curbs)

What it is: The mouthpiece (usually single-jointed) has many rounded edges. However, it is not actually "corkscrew" in shape, but more has a more "screw-like" mouthpiece with blunt edges. Thicker than a wire bit, thinner than a slow twist.

Action: The edges amplify pressure on the mouth, especially the bars and tongue. Considered severe.

Uses: Mostly seen in English-type disciplines, and in driving. Not permitted in dressage. Note: The name is often incorrectly used to refer to the slow twist or wire bit. These bits are not the same.
[edit] Single Twisted Wire


Twisted wire.

Types of Bits: snaffle, gag, curb

What it is: Mouthpiece is a single-jointed bit made of a thin twisted piece of wire for each joint.

Action: The wire bit is extremely severe. It is not only very thin, but it has twists in it that cause pressure point.

Materials: Stainless steel preferred for English disciplines, sweet iron and copper seen in Western disciplines.

Uses: The twisted wire is extremely severe. It is not permitted for dressage. It is more commonly seen in the Western disciplines than the English, although the jumping disciplines occasionally feature wire bits. These bits are for strong horses that pull or take off, and those with "hard" mouths. It should only be used by skilled riders with soft hands. Some people do not use these bits because they believe them to be cruel, although many trainers agree they are appropriate in certain circumstances with particular horses.
Note: The wire bit is often incorrectly referred to as the slow twist or corkscrew. These bits are not the same.
[edit]

The Double Twisted Wire

Types of Bits: snaffle, gag, curb

What it is: Bit has 2 mouthpieces, each one single jointed and made of twisted wire.

Action: The two joints amplify the nutcracker action. The wire makes the mouthpieces thin and sharp. The two mouthpieces cause extreme pressure on the bars. This bit is very severe, and should only be used by skilled riders with soft hands. Some people do not use these bits because they believe them to be cruel.

Materials: Metals, usually stainless steel but also sweet iron and copper

Uses: Not permitted for dressage. Very severe, used on horses that are very strong.
[edit]

The Saw Chain Mouth
Types of bits: snaffle
What it is: As the name suggests, the mouthpiece is made out of a piece of chainsaw.
Uses: Extremely severe, and quite uncommon. The majority of trainers will not use such a bit. Note: due to the extreme severity, most equestrian organizations would not permit this bit in competition.
[edit]

The Double-Mouth/Scissors/"W" or "Y" Mouth

Types of Bits: snaffle, gag, curb

What it is: Bit has 2 mouthpieces, each one single jointed.

Action: The two joints amplify the nutcracker action. They also cause extreme pressure on the bars. This bit is very severe, and should only be used by skilled riders with soft hands. Some people do not use these bits because they believe them to be cruel.

Materials: Metals, usually stainless steel but also sweet iron and copper.

Uses: Not permitted for dressage. Very severe, used on horses that are very strong.
[edit]

Hollow Mouth

Types of bits: snaffle, pelham, gag

What it is: A mouthpiece (usually single jointed, but not always) that is hollow in the middle, making it very light. The mouthpiece is usually thicker than average.

Action: The thick, hollow mouthpiece supposedly spreads out pressure, making it less severe.
[edit]

Roller bits

A curb bit with a roller or cricket.
[edit]

The Cricket, Cherry Roller and other Roller bits

Types of bits: snaffle, curb, gag, pelham

What it is: A cricket is a single roller placed within the port of a curb bit. Usually containing copper, often producing a rattling or "cricket-like" sound when the horse moves it around.
The cherry roller bit has multiple rollers along its mouthpiece and may be of steel, copper, or alternate between the two. The mouthpiece may be jointed or straight.

Action: Rollers are supposed to help a horse relax its jaw and accept the bit. They encourage salivation and may also calm nervous horses or provide an outlet for nervous tongue movements. Rollers do not affect the severity of the bit.

Uses: Crickets are very commonly seen on western curb bridles, particularly certain Spanish and California styles such as the spade, half breed, or salinas mouthpieces and are legal for western pleasure competition. Cherry rollers are mainly an English-style bit, but are not permitted in dressage.
[edit]

The Magenis

Types of bits snaffle

Types of Bit rings: Usually eggbutt or loose ring.

What it is: The Magenis is a single-jointed bit with "rollers," or bead-like structures that may spin around, in its mouthpiece. The mouthpiece is squared off.

Action: The rollers are supposed to activate the horse's tongue and help the horse relax and accept the bit. Rollers may also help distract a nervous horse. The edges of the square mouthpiece create pressure points, making the bit severe.

Uses: Seen in the English disciplines, not permitted in dressage. A fairly uncommon bit.
[edit]

Key bit

Types of Bits: snaffle

What it is: The center of the mouthpiece has short "keys" extending from it, which are movable on the bit. The keys rest on the tongue, below the bit.

Action: The keys are supposed to encourage the horse to relax, as the horse plays with them in his mouth.
[edit]

Tongue bit/Tongue Correction bit/Tongue port

Types of bits: usually snaffle, sometimes pelham

What it is:A flat piece of rubber that slides on a mullen mouth, or a metal bit that already has a flat piece in the center of the mouthpiece. The flat piece is wide and goes backwards in the mouth.

Uses: the purpose of this bit is to prevent a horse from getting his tongue over it. It can be useful in retraining, and for horse's for whom this is a habit. This therefore gives the rider more control. Not permitted in dressage.
[edit]

Mouthpiece Thickness

A standard mouthpiece is 3/8 inch in diameter, measured one inch out from the bit rings (the area that usually come in contact with the bars). The common belief is that a thinner mouthpiece increases the severity of the bit, because it decreases the bearing surface and makes the bit "sharper." However, up to a point, some horses perform better with a thinner mouthpiece to a thicker one because there is less metal in their mouth and therefore more room for the tongue. This is mostly true if the rider has soft hands. Thinner mouthpieces are also preferable when using a double bridle, as the horse has even less room for its tongue with two bits in his mouth.

On the other hand, very thin bits (such as the twisted wire bits) have a marked severity over thicker bits. Some wire bits may come in a thickness as low as 1/16 inch, making them extremely severe to the point where it is easy for any rider to cut and ruin the horse's mouth, especially the lips. Many horsemen, even the most skilled riders, will not put such a harsh bit in their horse's mouths. Many equestrian organizations do not allow a bit to be 1/4 inch or thinner in diameter.
If the rider gives crude aids, it is generally best to pick a bit mouthpiece that is thicker. This may also be true with some horses with relatively thin bars, such as some Thoroughbreds.
[edit]

Mouthpiece Material


A sweet iron mouthpiece with copper inlay, designed to encourage salivation and a soft mouth


A copper mouthpiece.
Stainless steel: The most popular material for bits. It is strong, easy to clean, and doesn't rust. It is considered to be a "cold" metal that does not encourage or discourage salivation.
Copper: Warms up quickly, but does not last as long as stainless steel. It is supposed to encourage the horse to salivate and accept the bit. There are some people who refuse to use copper bits because they believe them to be distasteful, and that to be the reason why some horses chew them so readily. Because these bits wear out fairly quickly, they should be checked regularly to make sure they are maintaining their integrity.
Copper alloy: by combining copper with a harder metal, the bit lasts longer.
Sweet iron: easily rusts, which supposedly encourages salivation from the horse and acceptance of the bit. This metal is used in many Western riding disciplines, and is not as popular in the English.
Brass alloy: combination of brass, silicon, and aluminum. Is said to have some of the same qualities as copper, but is cheaper.
Rubber: softens the action of the bit. All rubber bits are very gentle, but are easily chewed and destroyed. Bits that add rubber to an underlying metal mouthpiece last longer, but the rubber must be periodically replaced. A waterproof bandage product called Sealtex is often used to add rubber to a metal bit.
Aluminum: Considered a very bad choice for a mothpiece as it tends to dry out the mouth and may be toxic. Occasionally seen in very cheap western-style bits. To be avoided.
Synthetics: Any number of tough plastics are used for bit designs, combining the softness of rubber with more durability. The best are not easily destroyed by chewing.
[edit] See also
Bridle
Bit (horse)
Bit ring
Bit shank
[edit] References and external links
The Bit Gallery
Categories: Horse tack
     
    03-25-2008, 10:41 AM
  #47
Foal
I just love coming onto a forum as a newbie and clicking on the first post only to see how full of bad information it is.

I for one love to learn new things. I also educate myself before I assume that something is horrible.

I find it ironic that some people can justify a double bridle/bit but won't learn how other bits used in other disciplines truly work. Can we say "double standard"?

And just an FYI, a mule mouth piece won't cut the bars because it doesn't work on the bars. It could cut the tongue or the lips, but NOT the bars.
     
    03-25-2008, 10:44 AM
  #48
Foal
I will be back later to see what you have to say to this..... as for now I am going to ride YES ride my 4 head and work with my yearling.
Oh and I will ride one in a broken snaffle with a GERMAN martingale - the other in an ED WRIGHT Med Shank lifter bit with a german martingale (www.edandmartha.com for specs on the bit) the other with a port shank bit and a rope tiedown (I didn't train this one) and the last with just a dog bone lifter bit. Now how is that for inhumane??? Oh and I run barrels, rope steers and have even shown english - ooh yeah and jumped (did that before I became a barrel racer - it was way tooo judgemental and stuffy for me)

Good Day! :)
     
    03-25-2008, 11:15 AM
  #49
Foal
Re: That is INHUMANE!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Abby
I remember a while back about talk of a "chainsaw bit" well bejeebers here is one and its FOR SALE!

http://www.melindaharllee.com/bits.htm

Scroll down a while, you'll see it. You have to pass through their nasty collection of rusty bits to see it.

MULE BIT
     
    03-25-2008, 11:16 AM
  #50
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tilis
I just love coming onto a forum as a newbie and clicking on the first post only to see how full of bad information it is.

I for one love to learn new things. I also educate myself before I assume that something is horrible.

I find it ironic that some people can justify a double bridle/bit but won't learn how other bits used in other disciplines truly work. Can we say "double standard"?

And just an FYI, a mule mouth piece won't cut the bars because it doesn't work on the bars. It could cut the tongue or the lips, but NOT the bars.
God one! What you said! Lol
     

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