Kimblewick Bit - Page 2
 
 

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Kimblewick Bit

This is a discussion on Kimblewick Bit within the Horse Tack and Equipment forums, part of the Horse Tack category
  • Medium port kimblewick
  • Low port kimblewicke, ride with one hand or two

 
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    09-20-2010, 01:52 AM
  #11
Green Broke
I have used kimberwickes with good results. They're good for headstrong horses, to teach them to listen. You'll want to work with a good trainer so you can wean him out of the kimberwicke as he starts responding better (and you learn to control him better). The next bit I like to step down to is a full cheek with a copper roller middle.

I would learn the one-rein-halt ASAP. This quick stop maneuver can save your butt with a bolter. You need to be in control though. If done incorrectly, it can be ineffective, or at worst, you both could end up in the dirt. I teach all my students how to effectively do a one-rein-halt and an emergency dismount. Safety 101 .
     
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    09-20-2010, 01:29 PM
  #12
Green Broke
Ok im NOT trying to take of the post, sorry lol but I do have a question & didnt' want to start another kimberwicke thread... so my mare (stated before) does best on a loose rein/neck reining. She does wonderful at gymkhana & such in any bit but when we're out on the trails & get running fast/racing she refuses to stop! This isn't a problem if we're in a position to do a one-rein stop (which works great for her) but if we're not then it takes alot of consistant tugging to get her to eventually slow down.
I have her in a tomthumb version right now where it has higher-rings which allows it to be used as a regular snaffle when im in the ring as well as lower rings which act as a leverage bit when we're on the trail & she responds wonderfully to it.
I'm interested in a kimberwicke as well because I have macate reins & would like a bit that they would work better on, but one that has the control if she needs it (which as said, is only when we're running or else she's ridden on a really loose rein).
Again, NOT trying to take over OP ;)
     
    09-20-2010, 09:47 PM
  #13
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
How young is "not that young"? And why is someone referring to themselves as such riding a 4 year old? Anyone really with under 5 years riding experience beyond adolescence should be on something safe, quiet and broke so that they can learn to develop a stable seat, soft hands and an ability to really ride and not just be a passenger.
The problem is not the bit, it is the mismatched experience level of horse and rider. When you can safely ride out a bolt, a buck, a rear, a kick, etc either singly or in combination then you should be riding a 4 year old. Before your seat is able to ride through those things, and you are a skilled enough rider to be correcting them, you should not be riding a 4 year old.
Sell the horse before there are major issues created by your inexperience and buy something that you can learn from, not that will terrify you and break your bones. Riding needs to be fun, not scary.

Good luck!
Oh, i've had definitely more than five years of riding! Lol! I've been riding for at least 9 and a half years. I can tell you, i'm certainly not 10 and i'm over 11. But, it' unsafe to say ur age on the internet. So, all I can tell you is that I am over 11 :)
     
    09-21-2010, 02:43 PM
  #14
Banned
After reading this topic and your pony's barn page.... I would have to agree that your pony definitely needs training, not a different bit. How long was he at the trainer's to start?
And 9 years experience can mean so many things... have you taken formal lessons for all 9 years? Some of those years, or none? I agree that this doesn't sound like the best match... unless you have a trainer working with you both.
Your pony will remember how he got rid of you, and could very well try it again.
     
    09-21-2010, 07:33 PM
  #15
Started
A kimberwick might slow down a horse faster after they bolt, but it won't necessarily prevent them from bolting. Only training can do that.
     
    09-22-2010, 07:40 AM
  #16
Foal
Unhappy

Quote:
Originally Posted by ImagineThat    
After reading this topic and your pony's barn page.... I would have to agree that your pony definitely needs training, not a different bit. How long was he at the trainer's to start?
And 9 years experience can mean so many things... have you taken formal lessons for all 9 years? Some of those years, or none? I agree that this doesn't sound like the best match... unless you have a trainer working with you both.
Your pony will remember how he got rid of you, and could very well try it again.
For about 1 and a half to 2 years I hardly rode as I was traveling around Australia. Then when we came back I did some horse camps. My dad found a lady he knew who had a horse I could exersize for her. I eventually got up to the stage on that horse where I could take him to pony club as we had made a bond. Then, my dreams were crushed as the lady my dad knew didn't own the horse, he belonged to the owners of they property she leased and they decided to sell him. The lady did everything she could, she offered to buy him, but someone had already looked at him and paid for him :(
Then 2 colts showed up at the ladys'. She saved them from going to the knackery. One of the colts was Spider. She offered Spider to my dad and she would train him. So, dad bought him and started training spider. I helped her. She had sooo many horses she didn't have time to train him. So I trained him to where I could evtually trot him with a saddle, bridle and no one leading us. But then we found out he was 2 and put him out to pasture to grow.
If you read my pony's barn page you should know the rest :)

We weren't buying the bit to specifically stop him from bolting, just to give me more control over him.

I've decided to stop using Horse Forum as every thread I start, everyone thinks I don't know anything about horses. I know a lot more than an average girl my age! And I'm sick of hearing everyone complain. There is a little saying...
If you don't have anything nice to say, don't say anything at all!!!
Thankyou, some have you have been helpful, some of you have not...

I hope you all continue your lives and I bid you good day!
     
    09-22-2010, 08:32 AM
  #17
Green Broke
If you like for everything to be coated with sugar, the world of horses is not the place to be. I haven't read any of your other threads......but, honestly, if EVERYONE thinks you don't know what you're talking about, you either don't, or you need to work on rewording what you're saying. HF is a wonderful, wonderful place, but people are going to be blunt and straight-forward for the sake of your and your horse's safety. ETA: And keep in mind, many of the people giving you advice are EXTREMELY experienced. HF is full of profressional trainers, riding instructors, and champion riders. You should store every bit of information they give you in the back of your head. I know I do.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    09-22-2010, 09:38 AM
  #18
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShowJumpingGirl    
For about 1 and a half to 2 years I hardly rode as I was traveling around Australia. Then when we came back I did some horse camps. My dad found a lady he knew who had a horse I could exersize for her. I eventually got up to the stage on that horse where I could take him to pony club as we had made a bond. Then, my dreams were crushed as the lady my dad knew didn't own the horse, he belonged to the owners of they property she leased and they decided to sell him. The lady did everything she could, she offered to buy him, but someone had already looked at him and paid for him :(
Then 2 colts showed up at the ladys'. She saved them from going to the knackery. One of the colts was Spider. She offered Spider to my dad and she would train him. So, dad bought him and started training spider. I helped her. She had sooo many horses she didn't have time to train him. So I trained him to where I could evtually trot him with a saddle, bridle and no one leading us. But then we found out he was 2 and put him out to pasture to grow.
If you read my pony's barn page you should know the rest :)

We weren't buying the bit to specifically stop him from bolting, just to give me more control over him.

I've decided to stop using Horse Forum as every thread I start, everyone thinks I don't know anything about horses. I know a lot more than an average girl my age! And I'm sick of hearing everyone complain. There is a little saying...
If you don't have anything nice to say, don't say anything at all!!!
Thankyou, some have you have been helpful, some of you have not...

I hope you all continue your lives and I bid you good day!

If you choose to leave, then so be it. You asked for advice, and since it wasn't what you wanted to hear you are getting upset.
Nobody has been mean to you.... we are all concerned for you and Spider. You have already broken a bone with this pony... he needs professional training, as do you. Getting a harsher bit will only mask the issue for a little while.
I know you won't tell your age, but you say you are older than 11 and "know more than the average girl your age" .... Assuming you may be 12.... When I was 12 I had 6 years of professional lessons under my belt. Every week I had at least one lesson, mostly 2. I have shown on the "A" circuit since I was 7 1/2... started out in walk trot crossrails then short stirrup. I got my first pony at 8 or 9, did short stirrup and medium pony with him. Then got a Thoroughbred the summer I turned 12 and showed him in childrens hunter (3 foot class). ETC ETC.......... I had several others after him (including the horse I trained myself in my avatar pic), got into Jumpers more than hunters. At 14/15 I was doing the 3'6'' jumpers...the 4'6'' at 16 years. ( I am 24 now BTW )

There is no need to get defensive. No one said you were a terrible rider and didn't know anything. But even with my experience by the time I was 10-12, I would not have been able to break a pony all alone. I may have been able to under the strict guidance of my professional trainer, but it wouldn't have been easy.
As Sunny said, there are lots of knowledgeable people here, mostly trying to help others. You should stick around and listen.
     
    09-22-2010, 09:53 AM
  #19
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellygraceee    
It is called a Kimblewick. It can also be refered to as Kimberwick, Kimberwicke, Kimblewicke or Spanish Snaffle. It depends on where you come from mostly, but I can assure you, it's definitely called a Kimblewick.

The UK calls the bit a Kimblewick but it is known as a Kimberwicke in the US according to my research :) Always nice to learn something new
     
    09-22-2010, 03:23 PM
  #20
Started
Um...despite all the drama, I will comment on this, since my young one is currently in a kimberwick. The trainer actually started him in a snaffle (which is also what I used when bitting him for the first few weeks), then moved to a baucher (mullen mouth, not broken), then to the kimberwick. This is not a bit I would usually consider (especially since it is not dressage-legal), but he seems to go well in it for now...I would like to wean him back to a baucher, at least, if not a plain snaffle.

With the snaffle, he was very, very fidgety and strong: constantly chewing, fussing, got his tongue over it several times. He would run right through it, as if it weren't even there. You could almost see him "tuning out" so he could play with this bit like a dog with a chew toy. Anything with a broken mouthpiece showed the same results.

With the solid bar of the mullen mouth, he was better about the fussing, but it was determined he needed a bit more space for his big fat tongue

With the kimberwick, he has been the least fussy and seems to go happily. It is only used on the high slot (least curb action) with a loose chain, so it works similarly to the baucher, but the low port seems to give his tongue enough clearance to be comfortable.

Again, I was fairly surprised when this ended up being the best solution for him at this point in time. Just thought I'd share my story and the logic behind the choice.
     

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bits, kimblewick, tack

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