Leather Mold
   

       The Horse Forum > Horse Tack > Horse Tack and Equipment

Leather Mold

This is a discussion on Leather Mold within the Horse Tack and Equipment forums, part of the Horse Tack category
  • White mold on saddle
  • Leather saddle - removing mold with white vinegar

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    03-08-2009, 08:43 PM
  #1
Foal
Question Leather Mold

Does anyone know how to stop/treat a greenish fine textured mold that will appear on some of the leather areas of a saddle. The saddle has been cleaned with Murphy's Oil Soap. Saddle also had Bick 4 worked into all of the leather. (leather treatment) The mold can be wiped off but after maybe after a few weeks it is back again. This saddle has been stored in an inhabiated house so cold or unwanted moisture is not a problem. This saddle also has a very distinctive ordor to it.......Sort of a leather type odor. Saddle is an endurance type saddle......

Help.

Gerald
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    03-08-2009, 08:51 PM
  #2
Foal
White vinegar will kill the mold and then just wash with saddle soap and condition as you normally would.
     
    03-08-2009, 09:30 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Yup, dressageappy is right, exactly what I would use (have used).
     
    03-09-2009, 02:39 PM
  #4
Foal
Good to know - thanks! I clean everything with vinegar - lol, but I haven't tried it on my saddle. I have a very stubborn fender on my show saddle that occassionally molds...
     
    03-10-2009, 07:25 AM
  #5
Foal
Nice...I get that green mold on my leather bridles around the screws...pain it the butt it is!
     
    03-10-2009, 07:28 AM
  #6
Started
Will the vinegar discolor light oiled tack? Otheriwse it sounds like a great idea

Thanks
     
    03-19-2009, 09:43 PM
  #7
Foal
Mold v Vinegar

Quote:
Originally Posted by Angel_Leaguer    
will the vinegar discolor light oiled tack? Otheriwse it sounds like a great idea

Thanks
I tried using straight and also diluted white vinegar on the mold, the mold was still there the next day...I then tried gently scrubbing the saddle with the Leather Therapy wash product and the mold was gone after cleaning and did not reappear the next day.........I have noticed that Leather Therapy Wash in 16 oz bottles sold for about 16.00, not they only make the 8 oz for the same price.......Good product but expensive......

Comment any one.
     
    03-19-2009, 11:49 PM
  #8
Green Broke
Here's what I have done with success for stubborn mold.

When you wash the saddle with vinegar (white vinegar, 50/50 with water), you have to have a bucket full of wash cloths and use a NEW wash cloth with EVERY wipe. You do NOT want to put mold back on the saddle by using the same washcloth on the whole saddle. Wipe down every available surface. Use a soft toothbrush or paintbrush to get th evinegar into cracks or crevices. Once the saddle has been totally wiped clean with vinegar, use a clean wet washcloth to wipe off any left over vinegar. Let the saddle totally dry in your house.

Then, take it outside in the DIRECT sunlight, preferably afternoon sun. Let it sit out there for a couple of hours, rotating the saddle if you need to, to make sure all sides of it are exposed to 45-60 minutes of direct sunlight.

If the saddle has a fleece underside, use Lysol and saturate the fleece lining, allowing it to dry in the sunlight. Use a dog or cat slicker brush to fluff up the fleece once it's dry.

Bring it back inside and give it another thorough vinegar treatment.

Then (likely the next day) clean the saddle with Castile soap. You can get it from most Wal-Marts or grocery stores. It's in the laundry isle. It has less oils in it than saddle soap or murphy's, and is gentle enough to use on leather. Clean it with a sponge, frequently washing out the sponge in clean water (don't just dip it back in the same bowel of water to re-wet it. Use a soft toothbrush to get into all of the nooks and cranies of the saddle.

Now, day 2, set it outside in the afternoon sun again, to get another good sun treatment. The sunlight KILLS fungus and bacterie relatively quickly, so sunlight is your friend when trying to get rid of stubborn mold.

Once it's totally dry, bring it back inside and condition it with a conditioner that contains a mold inhibitor, like Leather Therapy. Condition all available surfaces, with 2 or 3 coats.

When you store the saddle, leave a white towel draped over it. Swap out the towels regularly, bleaching them between uses.
     
    03-20-2009, 12:42 PM
  #9
Foal
Mold

Quote:
Originally Posted by luvs2ride1979    
Here's what I have done with success for stubborn mold.

When you wash the saddle with vinegar (white vinegar, 50/50 with water), you have to have a bucket full of wash cloths and use a NEW wash cloth with EVERY wipe. You do NOT want to put mold back on the saddle by using the same washcloth on the whole saddle. Wipe down every available surface. Use a soft toothbrush or paintbrush to get th evinegar into cracks or crevices. Once the saddle has been totally wiped clean with vinegar, use a clean wet washcloth to wipe off any left over vinegar. Let the saddle totally dry in your house.

Then, take it outside in the DIRECT sunlight, preferably afternoon sun. Let it sit out there for a couple of hours, rotating the saddle if you need to, to make sure all sides of it are exposed to 45-60 minutes of direct sunlight.

If the saddle has a fleece underside, use Lysol and saturate the fleece lining, allowing it to dry in the sunlight. Use a dog or cat slicker brush to fluff up the fleece once it's dry.

Bring it back inside and give it another thorough vinegar treatment.

Then (likely the next day) clean the saddle with Castile soap. You can get it from most Wal-Marts or grocery stores. It's in the laundry isle. It has less oils in it than saddle soap or murphy's, and is gentle enough to use on leather. Clean it with a sponge, frequently washing out the sponge in clean water (don't just dip it back in the same bowel of water to re-wet it. Use a soft toothbrush to get into all of the nooks and cranies of the saddle.

Now, day 2, set it outside in the afternoon sun again, to get another good sun treatment. The sunlight KILLS fungus and bacterie relatively quickly, so sunlight is your friend when trying to get rid of stubborn mold.

Once it's totally dry, bring it back inside and condition it with a conditioner that contains a mold inhibitor, like Leather Therapy. Condition all available surfaces, with 2 or 3 coats.

When you store the saddle, leave a white towel draped over it. Swap out the towels regularly, bleaching them between uses.
Thanks for the info......
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Leather Quality? Vidaloco Horse Tack and Equipment 1 03-04-2009 04:57 PM
leather vs synthetic snowangel. Horse Tack and Equipment 4 07-31-2008 12:25 PM
How often do you oil a leather saddle? Harley's mom Horse Tack and Equipment 12 07-25-2008 07:30 PM
Leather Open Front Jumping boots, Hind leather ankle boots Painted1 Tack and Equipment Classifieds 9 11-07-2007 11:58 AM
getting mold from saddle hoyt_bowhunting Horse Tack and Equipment 0 05-25-2007 10:09 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:47 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0