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a little bit help please

This is a discussion on a little bit help please within the Horse Tack and Equipment forums, part of the Horse Tack category

     
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        02-02-2009, 12:28 AM
      #11
    Green Broke
    Great info Allie! That is exactly why I switched to the mylar today. Didn't like that crackerjack action
         
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        02-02-2009, 11:19 AM
      #12
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
    That is called "mouthing" mouthpiece. The "keys" are supposed to promote tongue movement, therefore relaxing the jaw.
    Personally... I wouldn't use that. I just think of having something sticking down the back of my tongue, and it doesn't present a pretty picture.

    I personally do NOT like single-joint bits. They have a crackerjack action on the horse's tongue and bars, protrude up into the horse's palate, and do not have full-mouth contact. I much prefer double-jointed bits.

    Here's what I like to start youngsters in:

    Full Cheek French Link.
    The full cheek part of it will prevent the bit from being pulled through the horse's mouth, which is big for a youngster, epecially if you lunge or ground-drive with a bit. The full cheek also applies lateral pressure, that is, when you pull on the right rein, the left cheekpiece will push against the left cheek, encouraging the horse to follow the right rein.
    The french link mouth is a nice double-joint bit that allows full mouth contact. There is no crackerjack action, and the bit lies nicely on the tongue.

    ---> A great analogy for choosing a bit mouthpiece!!
    Think of the bit as a bucket handle. If you had to carry a full bucket of water with that bit as the handle, would it hurt your hands?
    A single joint bit would pinch your hand, and you'd only really feel contact on the outside of your hand.
    A double joint would not, it would give you full contact, dispersing the pressure.
    You can think of this with many types of bits, for example:
    Twisted wire: ouch!!
    Double twisted wire: even more ouch!!
    Corkscrew: not as bad, but still ouch!!
    Slow twist: woud definitely not be pleasant!
    Agreed. The bits I have used in the past, I have always gave away with the horse I sold but I have to agree I'm not keen on single jointed bits either. I have not tried the Miller bits tho I think it's the route I might use.
    Good for you for asking around and doing some research. The type of bit you use in the wrong hands without proper training can really screw you up so give yourself a pat on the back for trying to learn more about them :)
         
        02-02-2009, 08:36 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
    That is called "mouthing" mouthpiece. The "keys" are supposed to promote tongue movement, therefore relaxing the jaw.
    Personally... I wouldn't use that. I just think of having something sticking down the back of my tongue, and it doesn't present a pretty picture.

    I personally do NOT like single-joint bits. They have a crackerjack action on the horse's tongue and bars, protrude up into the horse's palate, and do not have full-mouth contact. I much prefer double-jointed bits.

    Here's what I like to start youngsters in:

    Full Cheek French Link.
    The full cheek part of it will prevent the bit from being pulled through the horse's mouth, which is big for a youngster, epecially if you lunge or ground-drive with a bit. The full cheek also applies lateral pressure, that is, when you pull on the right rein, the left cheekpiece will push against the left cheek, encouraging the horse to follow the right rein.
    The french link mouth is a nice double-joint bit that allows full mouth contact. There is no crackerjack action, and the bit lies nicely on the tongue.

    ---> A great analogy for choosing a bit mouthpiece!!
    Think of the bit as a bucket handle. If you had to carry a full bucket of water with that bit as the handle, would it hurt your hands?
    A single joint bit would pinch your hand, and you'd only really feel contact on the outside of your hand.
    A double joint would not, it would give you full contact, dispersing the pressure.
    You can think of this with many types of bits, for example:
    Twisted wire: ouch!!
    Double twisted wire: even more ouch!!
    Corkscrew: not as bad, but still ouch!!
    Slow twist: woud definitely not be pleasant!
    What is this bit called? Im looking for a good one to start apollo out on that's not too expensive
         
        02-02-2009, 09:33 PM
      #14
    Showing
    The one in the picture? It's a full cheek french link :)

    Thank you for the positive feedback everyone!

    Denny works really really well in a french link.
         
        02-04-2009, 08:24 PM
      #15
    Foal
    Thanks for the great info I actually have a full cheek french liknk a just bought at the local consignment store for 6.00 so I guess that was a pretty good price
         
        02-04-2009, 08:37 PM
      #16
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
    That is called "mouthing" mouthpiece. The "keys" are supposed to promote tongue movement, therefore relaxing the jaw.
    Personally... I wouldn't use that. I just think of having something sticking down the back of my tongue, and it doesn't present a pretty picture.

    I personally do NOT like single-joint bits. They have a crackerjack action on the horse's tongue and bars, protrude up into the horse's palate, and do not have full-mouth contact. I much prefer double-jointed bits.

    Here's what I like to start youngsters in:

    Full Cheek French Link.
    The full cheek part of it will prevent the bit from being pulled through the horse's mouth, which is big for a youngster, epecially if you lunge or ground-drive with a bit. The full cheek also applies lateral pressure, that is, when you pull on the right rein, the left cheekpiece will push against the left cheek, encouraging the horse to follow the right rein.
    The french link mouth is a nice double-joint bit that allows full mouth contact. There is no crackerjack action, and the bit lies nicely on the tongue.

    ---> A great analogy for choosing a bit mouthpiece!!
    Think of the bit as a bucket handle. If you had to carry a full bucket of water with that bit as the handle, would it hurt your hands?
    A single joint bit would pinch your hand, and you'd only really feel contact on the outside of your hand.
    A double joint would not, it would give you full contact, dispersing the pressure.
    You can think of this with many types of bits, for example:
    Twisted wire: ouch!!
    Double twisted wire: even more ouch!!
    Corkscrew: not as bad, but still ouch!!
    Slow twist: woud definitely not be pleasant!
    this is really similar to what I was told to use year ago, Mine is not a full cheek, its at D bit with the football shape link in the middle
         
        02-04-2009, 11:58 PM
      #17
    Started
    I love the comparison to the bit being like a bucket handle! I'll have to use that when I'm trying to explain the same concept to others! ^_^ I was also wondering whether a D-ring type bit would do the same thing with preventing the bit from pulling through.
         
        02-05-2009, 12:50 AM
      #18
    Showing
    No, a D-ring won't have the same non-pull through effect, but it is better than a loose ring for that. A D-ring WILL have lateral pressure like a full cheek, but if you compared the length of the bars, the full cheek is longer and uses bit loops, which further prevents pull-through.

    I love the bucket analogy, it makes so much sense.
         
        02-05-2009, 02:56 AM
      #19
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
    That is called "mouthing" mouthpiece. The "keys" are supposed to promote tongue movement, therefore relaxing the jaw.
    Personally... I wouldn't use that. I just think of having something sticking down the back of my tongue, and it doesn't present a pretty picture.

    I personally do NOT like single-joint bits. They have a crackerjack action on the horse's tongue and bars, protrude up into the horse's palate, and do not have full-mouth contact. I much prefer double-jointed bits.

    Here's what I like to start youngsters in:

    Full Cheek French Link.
    The full cheek part of it will prevent the bit from being pulled through the horse's mouth, which is big for a youngster, epecially if you lunge or ground-drive with a bit. The full cheek also applies lateral pressure, that is, when you pull on the right rein, the left cheekpiece will push against the left cheek, encouraging the horse to follow the right rein.
    The french link mouth is a nice double-joint bit that allows full mouth contact. There is no crackerjack action, and the bit lies nicely on the tongue.

    ---> A great analogy for choosing a bit mouthpiece!!
    Think of the bit as a bucket handle. If you had to carry a full bucket of water with that bit as the handle, would it hurt your hands?
    A single joint bit would pinch your hand, and you'd only really feel contact on the outside of your hand.
    A double joint would not, it would give you full contact, dispersing the pressure.
    You can think of this with many types of bits, for example:
    Twisted wire: ouch!!
    Double twisted wire: even more ouch!!
    Corkscrew: not as bad, but still ouch!!
    Slow twist: woud definitely not be pleasant!
    I have to agree with everything said here aswell
         
        02-05-2009, 01:49 PM
      #20
    Foal
    I really have nothing to offer on the subject, as I actually had the same question. Thank you to the person asking it and thanks for all the neat advice. Learned a lot here. I also love the bucket analogy.
         

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