Loose ring snaffle - The Horse Forum
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 10-23-2010, 08:50 AM Thread Starter
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Loose ring snaffle

I have searched the internet and this forum, but I cannot for the life of me figure out why a loose ring snaffle stops a horse from bracing against the bit. Its something about the bit sliding through, but I don't get it.
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post #2 of 9 Old 10-23-2010, 09:41 AM
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The rings aren't fixed, so they rotate when the horse braces.
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post #3 of 9 Old 10-23-2010, 04:22 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reachthestars View Post
The rings aren't fixed, so they rotate when the horse braces.
I get that, but why would bracing trigger that? I just don't get it.

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post #4 of 9 Old 10-23-2010, 04:29 PM
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The vibration of the rings can induce the horse to chew or the jaw to relax and move and therefore bracing is not possible.
Try it, If you tickle your horse in the corners of its mouth, very often it will open it's mouth, lick it's lips, and/or chew. A horse with a moving jaw is a horse that can not clamp it's jaw shut and brace.
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post #5 of 9 Old 10-23-2010, 05:50 PM
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Hm, learn something new every day. I didn't know that loose rings prevent bracing.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
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post #6 of 9 Old 10-23-2010, 05:54 PM
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Well, I don't think it can prevent it in all horses....because well you know horses are horses and the minute you say it can't happen, a horse will come along that will go against the rules.
My gelding goes very poorly in a loose ring because he never learned to chew softly into the bit. He chomps and hangs his mouth open and tongue lols, so while he's not bracing, but he's not exactly on the bit either. He's much better in a D or eggbutt.
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post #7 of 9 Old 10-23-2010, 05:55 PM
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LOL, oh I get that. I have always preferred loose rings on my greenies just because I like the feel of them more.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
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post #8 of 9 Old 10-23-2010, 07:08 PM
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I think it has to do with the fact that no matter what position the horse puts his head in, the elbow to bit to mouth line of the rein can be maintained, and because the ring rotates, it does this without changing the orientation of the bit itself inside the mouth. If you pull really upward on a D ring, eventualy the rein hits the end of it's ability to slide upward, then it applies upward pressure on the moutpiece part of the pit, changing the way it lies in the horse's mouth.
A loose ring would just rotate and kind of slip out of the pull. OF course, in extremes , you can pull the bit into all kinds of wierd postions.
There is just something about a loose ring that allows one to better feel the horse's contact with the bit, even at the tiniest amounts of pressure.
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post #9 of 9 Old 10-23-2010, 07:53 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
I think it has to do with the fact that no matter what position the horse puts his head in, the elbow to bit to mouth line of the rein can be maintained, and because the ring rotates, it does this without changing the orientation of the bit itself inside the mouth. If you pull really upward on a D ring, eventualy the rein hits the end of it's ability to slide upward, then it applies upward pressure on the moutpiece part of the pit, changing the way it lies in the horse's mouth.
A loose ring would just rotate and kind of slip out of the pull. OF course, in extremes , you can pull the bit into all kinds of wierd postions.
There is just something about a loose ring that allows one to better feel the horse's contact with the bit, even at the tiniest amounts of pressure.
The bolded part is a very satisfying answer. There's nothing really any specfic way to describe it, there is just something.
Haha, thanks for all the explanations, everyone!

"The wise man thinks he knows nothing.
The fool thinks he knows everything."

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