Need Help with Bit
 
 

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Need Help with Bit

This is a discussion on Need Help with Bit within the Horse Tack and Equipment forums, part of the Horse Tack category

     
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        06-17-2010, 05:44 PM
      #1
    Weanling
    Need Help with Bit

    I bought a horse today and she coming home tomorrow. I do not know a whole lot about bits, so I have a ccouple questions about them....

    What is a broken bit? That is the bit that Gracie uses.

    Is that an OK bit?

    Where can I get that type of bit, and what price range does in fit in?
         
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        06-17-2010, 05:52 PM
      #2
    Showing
    Here is an article I wrote about snaffle bits:
    Bit Information (Snaffle and English-Type Bits)

    I would likely suggest a double jointed loose ring or dee ring. They run anywhere from $15-40 for a stainless steel, or more for an alloy.
         
        06-17-2010, 05:53 PM
      #3
    Yearling
    A "broken bit" is more commonly known as a snaffle bit.
    They are relatively inexpensive to buy, between 10 and 30 dollars for a basic one.
    I would suggest going with a double jointed snaffle, such as a french or lozenge link, because it will not protrude in to the palate, and it is in approximately the same price range.
    You can read more about bits in the sticky at the top of this section of the forum.
         
        06-17-2010, 05:55 PM
      #4
    Showing
    Oy, such a simple question but not a simple answer!

    You're probably referring to a jointed bit called a broken snaffle.

    There are many types of jointed bits out there, some more harsh than others.

    What type of tack does she wear, English or Western? Because you're going to want to get her a bit that goes with her tack.

    There are D ring, loose ring, french link, eggbutt, Pelham, Kimberwicke, Tom Thumb, full cheek, etc. that all come jointed.

    You'll also need her mouth size, because bits are sized. My TB wears a 5", and my Arabian wears a 4 3/4".

    Your best bet would be to ask her previous owner what size and type of jointed bit she wears.
         
        06-17-2010, 05:57 PM
      #5
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by moroso231    
    A "broken bit" is more commonly known as a snaffle bit.
    Unfortunately this is not true; a shank bit can have almost any type of mouthpiece but it isn't a snaffle. When you pull on the rein of a snaffle bit, the horse's mouth feels exactly that pressure; a curb bit at least doubles the pressure.
         
        06-17-2010, 06:05 PM
      #6
    Green Broke
    When you tried her out, did you happen to take a look at the bit they were using? What did it look like..describe anything you saw...did the reins attach to rings, something that looked like a D? Or was it different?
         
        06-17-2010, 06:06 PM
      #7
    Weanling
    She will be ridden Western.

    Thank you for the answers!
         
        06-17-2010, 06:08 PM
      #8
    Weanling
    I didn't study it close enough, but they are coming out to our house for another test run, I will take a look at the bit and how it attches then :)
         
        06-17-2010, 07:52 PM
      #9
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
    Unfortunately this is not true; a shank bit can have almost any type of mouthpiece but it isn't a snaffle. When you pull on the rein of a snaffle bit, the horse's mouth feels exactly that pressure; a curb bit at least doubles the pressure.
    Yes, but I was speaking in general terms- and sometimes in western riding, any bit with a jointed mouthpiece is referred to as a snaffle, regardless of whether or not it has shanks. An example of this would be an argentine snaffle. Whether these bits are "true" snaffles is generally a discipline-specific argument, but regardless, they are also referred to as snaffles.
         
        06-17-2010, 08:50 PM
      #10
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by moroso231    
    Yes, but I was speaking in general terms- and sometimes in western riding, any bit with a jointed mouthpiece is referred to as a snaffle, regardless of whether or not it has shanks. An example of this would be an argentine snaffle. Whether these bits are "true" snaffles is generally a discipline-specific argument, but regardless, they are also referred to as snaffles.
    One of my pet peeves ;) I hate it when manufacturers mislabel curb/leverage/shank bits as "snaffles" because it is incorrect. Snaffles are a 1:1 ratio.
         

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