On to the NEXT problem: aka HELP!
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Horse Tack > Horse Tack and Equipment

On to the NEXT problem: aka HELP!

This is a discussion on On to the NEXT problem: aka HELP! within the Horse Tack and Equipment forums, part of the Horse Tack category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        10-04-2009, 07:23 PM
      #1
    Green Broke
    Unhappy On to the NEXT problem: aka HELP!

    On to the NEXT problem! (1/2 Rant)

    My stupid Sunny is lucky to still own his head after what happened this weekend.

    So I was riding with a group in the mountains this weekend on some steep roooocky trails. Now whenever he gets 'left behind' he will get feisty, but I usually just let him gait up to them like normal. If he gets out of control I will just spin him in a circle and carry on like normal.

    However, it is very difficult to spin a horse on a steeeeeep rocky trail going downhill who is notorious for tripping and FALLING.

    So he started to get that feeling of no return (the peak of his gait right before a canter. Once we get there, it is almost impossible to manually stop him). I ended up hauling on his mouth with all my strength, extremely off-balance, and he goes running down the rock trail with his head a-flailing doing everything he can to get away from the bit, tripping all the way. It's amazing I'm still alive. Literally. No joke.

    I'd tried the crossover (pull on one rein and cross the other on the neck to act like a pulley until you get the horse's attention), short snatches, saying 'easy' which is his usual que, but he is too herdbound.

    He listens to me only when he is alone. Not with other horses.

    Eventually I just held my breath, prayed I didn't go flying off the mountain, and spun him. He almost fell a few times, but we managed. Not because I gained control but because the group stopped and waited for us.

    I've tried simply everything.

    -re-training (work) in ring
    -new bit (pelham, snaffle, C curb)
    -MORE work in ring
    -Work by himself
    -Lunging
    -MORE ring work
    -Oh, did I mention ring work?

    It is plain UN-SAFE to ride an out-of-control horse on the trail. That's all I use him for: Trail riding. So what's the point of owning an-out-of-control-horse who can't handle himself on the trail?

    Should I just.... (and it pains me to say) Sell him?

    Everything about him is perfect.

    -size (16 hands of muscle)
    -temperment (silly, ******, high most of the time)
    -looks ()
    -gait (100% beautiful. It was particularily excellent this weekend)
    -everything, except?

    HERD BOUND issue!

    ~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

    So I got to thinking...

    -What do cavisons do?

    Do they help keep the mouth shut, tradition.. What? Would a cavison help keep him from evading the bit and get him listening better?

    -Trainer.

    Would a trainer be able to help buddy-sourness? Or is that a horse/natural thing?

    And by the way, I was riding him in his pelham. He seems for the most part to do very well with it. But all fails when he is herdbound. He even won't listen to his curb. So I don't think it is a bit problem.

    I'm kind of... Desperate?

    I'm willing to try most everything I can or that's in my price-range.

    I know gadgets aren't necessarily the answer, but I'd like to try that before spending money on a trainer. Expensive

    Help. Help. Help.

    I guess this should have gone in the training section, since my original question was going to be about cavisons, but I guess I got carried away. The cavison question still stands!
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        10-04-2009, 10:27 PM
      #2
    Weanling
    I am not use to dealing with mountains, but maybe use a caveson and a training fork or martigale with the rings made into the reins so you have some leverage.
    Are you riding English?

    I like a "life saver" type bit that barrel racers favor or a short gag of some sort. The life saver has a broken mouth piece with a short shank. Very forgiving, but gets their attention. Use a chin strap with it.

    Good luck and be safe.
         
        10-04-2009, 10:49 PM
      #3
    Green Broke
    I ride Australian, so kind of an English/Western mix ;)

    What are cavisons for?

    I've always thought he did better with ports, but know I'm thinking I should throw in something jointed to scare him a bit, lol.

    What about a standing or running martingale?
         
        10-04-2009, 10:56 PM
      #4
    Showing
    Cavessons are NOT to be used for control. A cavesson, in my opinion, should be used only for aesthetics. When you get into talking about flash nosebands, you are talking about quieting the jingling of a loose ring bit; you are NOT tying the horse's mouth shut. A figure-8 noseband will have a similar effect to the flash, but is also said to help with horses from crossing their jaws.

    "Throw something jointed to scare him a bit"
    Um.. please don't.
    Get a trainer.
    If you can't stop your horse, don't rely on equipment, because you'll forever be in search of a harsher bit to do the job. Training is the key.

    Martingales are NOT to give you control either. A running martingale will discourage a horse from breaking your nose if he's a notorious head-tosser.
    A standing martingale gives the horse something to balance on over jumps.
    NEITHER should be used for control.


    It sounds like you have a HUGE training issue right now. I suggest you get a trainer, and forget about the harsh equipment to "make" him listen.
         
        10-04-2009, 11:03 PM
      #5
    Green Broke
    I know, I know. I don't want to rely on equipment, HOWEVER.

    Can this problem really be fixed? Or is it... Natural?
         
        10-04-2009, 11:09 PM
      #6
    Showing
    It can be fixed.


    ETA - With training, not equipment.
         
        10-04-2009, 11:12 PM
      #7
    Yearling
    From what you are describing, it seems like the issue is out of hand and would be very difficult and dangerous for you to fix on your own. Instead of relying on harsher equipment, you need a trainer. The trainer can work on both the horse and you on the issue. By nature, horses prefer not to leave a herd, but a good riding horse must be able to walk away from other horses without any problems or nervousness.
         
        10-04-2009, 11:14 PM
      #8
    Super Moderator
    Why do you let him get that left behind when you know it's an issue? I'm not trying to be all mean (and this could totally be interpreted that way) but when a horse has an issue like that it's not going to be fixed by "making him do it anyway", especially if it's in such a dangerous situation.
    I can understand making him deal with it or whatever, in an open grassy field or somewhere similar but letting him get left behind on a dangerous trail? O.o

    Is he responsive completely in the arena? Does he slow down from all gaits as soon as you ask? If not, I personally would work on that before even attempting any sort of trail riding.
    I really don't think a stronger/different bit is going to help.
    What I've done before with a horse like that was that I made him be in the back of the line of horses and stop/half halt (whichever one caused him to freak out less) for a step. Then I'll let him walk and catch up. Eventually the horse I did that to figured it out and could care less because he knew he wasn't getting left behind. I've only ever done that to one horse so I'm not sure if it was just that horse that benefited from that or whether other horses could to.

    I am VERY glad you two are still intact and undamaged! =)
         
        10-04-2009, 11:21 PM
      #9
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wallaby    
    Why do you let him get that left behind when you know it's an issue?
    I knew someone would ask that.

    The group cantered away (scary enough) along the rocky trail. I had to yell out to have them stop. I *think* it was because their horses got out of hand. (*rolls eyes*)

    Quote:
    Is he responsive completely in the arena? Does he slow down from all gaits as soon as you ask? If not, I personally would work on that before even attempting any sort of trail riding.
    Yes.

    Quote:
    I really don't think a stronger/different bit is going to help.
    What I've done before with horses like that is I'll make them be in the back of the line of horses and stop/half halt (whichever one causes them to freak out less) for a step. Then I'll let them walk and catch up. Eventually the horse I did that to figured it out and could care less because he knew he wasn't getting left behind. I've only ever done that to one horse so I'm not sure if it was just that horse that benefited from that or whether other horses could to.
    That's the weird thing. He'll stop fine, but when he goes to go, he inches faster and faster. The bolded is where he gets sticky. He'll take that 'ok let's go' as **GO!**.
         
        10-04-2009, 11:21 PM
      #10
    Showing
    Sunny, I going to say something you may not like, but I say anyway... Ride on your own without other people. At least for some time. I know it's more boring and all, but it sounds like safer way to go. May be this way he'll learn to rely on you rather then other horses. OR get the companion on very quiet broke horse, so (s)he could stop it any time you need a hand.
         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Help with bit problem!! ILoveGeorgieMyPony Horse Tack and Equipment 20 06-24-2009 04:45 AM
    What do you think the problem is? bexandponies Horse Health 2 05-11-2009 08:30 AM
    Old Problem Solved New Problem Arrived! HorsesAreForever Horse Training 5 04-25-2009 03:17 AM
    No Problem Vidaloco Horse Training 4 08-25-2008 03:15 PM
    BAD PROBLEM, PLEASE HELP! Peartree Horse Grooming 2 09-23-2007 03:58 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:12 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0