Question About English Saddles
   

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Question About English Saddles

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  • Wintec wide for quarter horse
  • Wintec wide all purpose for quarter horse

 
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    06-08-2011, 04:41 PM
  #1
Started
Question About English Saddles

So, I've been wanting to buy an English saddle for a while now, and since I've gotten a job I have enough money saved up to buy a used one.

I need some help, though. I'm looking for an entry level type of saddle. I probably will only use it for things like trail riding and play days at my local saddle club. Should I be looking at All purpose saddles?

Also, what saddles tend to fit wider horses such as Quarter Horses and Paints?

I can spend about $450 bucks, but if I need to save up more I can.

Any advice appreciated. :)
     
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    06-08-2011, 04:55 PM
  #2
Super Moderator
I think an all purpose is a great saddle, esp. If you plan to do some trail riding in it. You want a size that is 2 inches larger than the western saddle that fits you. So, if you ride in a 15.5 W saddle, you need a 17.5 E saddle.

I like Crosby and Stubben and Collegieate for midlevel cost/quality for AP saddle. Your budget is good.
     
    06-08-2011, 04:59 PM
  #3
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
I think an all purpose is a great saddle, esp. If you plan to do some trail riding in it. You want a size that is 2 inches larger than the western saddle that fits you. So, if you ride in a 15.5 W saddle, you need a 17.5 E saddle.

I like Crosby and Stubben and Collegieate for midlevel cost/quality for AP saddle. Your budget is good.
Well, I'm having problems deciding on a size. My barrel saddle is a 14inch, but my pleasure saddle is a 15 inch. I'm assuming that English saddles are similiar to Western saddles in that some brands run smaller/larger in sizes, yes? I'll just have to go try some sizes and see.

I know my local tack shop has a 16.5 Collegiate A/P saddle that has the tree listed as 32cm. Is that wide..or not? Lol.
     
    06-08-2011, 05:16 PM
  #4
Showing
Tennessee, 32 cm. Is fairly wide. I got a 31 cm. For my chunky TB and it fits him very nicely. And yes, depending on the manufacturer and type of saddle, the seat sizes vary.

I have a 17.5 Wintec 2000 AP and a 17 Stubben Siegfried. The seats are just about equal in size, even though the Stubben is supposed to be .5 inches smaller.
     
    06-08-2011, 05:23 PM
  #5
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
Tennessee, 32 cm. Is fairly wide. I got a 31 cm. For my chunky TB and it fits him very nicely. And yes, depending on the manufacturer and type of saddle, the seat sizes vary.

I have a 17.5 Wintec 2000 AP and a 17 Stubben Siegfried. The seats are just about equal in size, even though the Stubben is supposed to be .5 inches smaller.

Okay, thank you. Both of my QHs fit into regular quarter horse trees (which I think are 6 3/4') so I'll try and use the ole wire hanger trick for them.

Sorry I keep adding on questions, but how much clearance should their be between the pommel of an english saddle and the withers? Is there are certain amount of fingers I can use to judge this like a western saddle? I have every intention of having someone with more knowledge of the fit of English saddles than me go with me, but I don't want to look like a complete idiot. Lol.
     
    06-08-2011, 05:26 PM
  #6
Showing
Here are some good tips for you:

A Saddle Fit For Your Horse

When checking your saddle to ensure a suitable fit to your horse, it is recommended you do so without a saddle pad since the pad can help mask any potential problem areas. Place the saddle on your horse's back and tighten the girth as if you were taking him out for a ride. While you are placing the saddle on his back you should be starting at the withers and moving the saddle down his back until you find the "sweet spot." Once this is done, make sure your horse is standing evenly on a flat surface and check for the following:

Is the saddle resting flat on your horse's back? The panel (the underside of the saddle) and the seat should be level with the ground. In addition the pommel should never be higher than the cantle, whereas the cantle in most cases will be noticeably higher than the pommel. The cantle height will vary depending on the type of English saddle you are using. In addition the saddle length should not reach back onto the horse's loins.

Check how the saddle flaps are resting against your horse's shoulder. They should compliment your horse's form and movement rather than act as a binder or hindrance.

Slide your hand along your horse's withers until they are underneath the pommel. You should be able to slide your hands underneath the saddle easily, and there should be equal clearance on both sides.

The general rule of thumb is there should be 3-4 fingers-width (3-4 fingers stacked on top of each other) of space between the pommel and your horse's withers. If you can fit more than four then your saddle is probably too narrow, whereas if you cannot stack more than 2 fingers the saddle is probably too wide. This rule of thumb can vary a finger or two depending on the specific type of English saddle as well as your horse's conformation.

Move behind your horse and check to ensure there is clearance along the length of the gullet. You should be able to see some light from the other side.


If the saddle passes these tests go ahead and remove the saddle, add a saddle pad, place the saddle back on and take your horse on an extended ride or exercise session. Pay particular attention to your horse's gait and movement, as well as his ear positioning and general happiness. If your horse's behavior indicates there is a problem, chances are the problem rests with the saddle.

Once the ride is finished check the underside of the saddle pad and ensure the sweat patterns are consistent. For example, if the right side is drier than the left side, chances are the saddle is pinching.
     
    06-08-2011, 05:34 PM
  #7
Started
That's very helpful! Thank you!
     
    06-08-2011, 08:56 PM
  #8
Showing
I'd say go for A/P (unless you want to do something specific). Yes, 32 is rather wide. I have 32 dressage Thornhill, but my horses are definitely not narrow (I have qh and paint).

BTW, it would be a good idea to make tracings of your horse and send them to the place like Trumbull Mountains so they can give some recommendations to you (they also sell used saddles and have great trial policy). New & Used Saddles, Saddle Fitting, Saddle Pads - Trumbull Mountain they have instructions on how to take tracing.
     
    06-12-2011, 01:14 AM
  #9
Yearling
I have a 31 Stubben that seems to fit my Paint pretty well.
     

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