Saddle Fitting Tool
   

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Saddle Fitting Tool

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  • Tool to fit saddle to horse
  • Saddle fitting tool

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    01-13-2013, 06:41 PM
  #1
Weanling
Saddle Fitting Tool

EQUImeasure Kit for saddle fit: Make a 3-D model of a horse, mule, or pony back

This is a link to a saddle fitting tool.

It is expensive, but it is a sheet that you heat up, mold to your horse's back, and let it cool and harden, supposedly giving you a 3-D map of the contours or your horse's back. I wondered if anyone has tried it, or has any thoughts about how useful it might be.
     
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    01-13-2013, 07:23 PM
  #2
Yearling
I’d be sceptical. Most of what people go on about saddle fit is nonsense and not driven by the needs of horses, but, instead, by marketing and the needs of the people who manufacture things like that. And they take advantage of people’s un-sureness about how saddles should fit.
The problem with much of what people think about saddle fit is that the bars of the saddle have to cover entirely the horse’s back and conform to the shape of the horse’s back. Now that is true, but only to a degree; and that is why you can, and should get saddles to fit the type of horses you ride, not the individual horse.
Firstly fitting a saddle to a horse’s back isn’t about just getting bars that precisely conform to the horse’s back, rather it is getting bars that distribute the most weight possible over the largest area possible while allowing the greatest range of freedom of movement for the horse’s back under the saddle. If the bars fit precisely to the contours of the horses back while it is standing on flat even ground, they could well be restricting movement somewhere.
So essentially the total criteria for what a good saddle is is entirely different from what many people think it is.
Add to that the fact that horses backs change considerably over their lifetimes and the same saddles can fit them throughout their lives. For example, of my old work horses I have one left, he is now 21 or 22, I can ride him in the saddles I rode him in 17 or 18 years ago and they still fit him fine.
Presumably if you are thinking about mapping your horse’s back you are thinking of having a custom saddle built? If so, I would forget that thing and just talk to the saddler and tree maker, they no doubt have their own methods of ascertaining how to make the tree to fit that would probably be better than that thing and not cost you 100 bucks.
Captain Evil likes this.
     
    01-13-2013, 07:46 PM
  #3
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnrewPL    
Presumably if you are thinking about mapping your horse’s back you are thinking of having a custom saddle built? If so, I would forget that thing and just talk to the saddler and tree maker, they no doubt have their own methods of ascertaining how to make the tree to fit that would probably be better than that thing and not cost you 100 bucks.
Are you a mind reader? Actually, I have a great Black Rhino saddle which was made for my Arabian some fifteen years ago... and when he died I contacted the saddler, David, to see if there was any way to alter it to fit my draft. I sent pictures of my draft and back tracings. He said that the saddle I have is exactly the one he would have made for my draft, and go ahead and use it. But I just kinda wanna be sure that the saddle is not hurting him; I wanna start eliminating reasons for his being a brat under when ridden...

DSC_1362.jpg

Note: I normally have the saddle back a few inches, and I now use a Y-cinch as a buckstrap, and a thick felted wool pad... think it is okay?
     
    01-13-2013, 08:01 PM
  #4
Started
A friend of mine actually has one of these, from what I understand(from what she told me) is that you mold it to your horses back, then saddle up and ride with it as a saddle pad, after about 10 minutes you take it off and you can see any pressure points your saddle is creating because the play dough type stuff inside moves away from the pressure points, so when you unsaddle you know that any thin spots are pressure points, the thinner the area, the more pressure. I hope I explained that right.
Captain Evil likes this.
     
    01-13-2013, 08:05 PM
  #5
Yearling
It looks OK, when you position the saddle have a look where the shoulder blade is and then position the BAR (not the front of the skirt) just behind that. Some people think you have to have it further back than that but what actually happens is that as the horses shoulder blade moves it will have no weight on it as it goes under the bar. The weight comes back on when it is out from under the saddle bar, so the important part there is not keeping the bar a long way back from the shoulder blade but having the skirts blocked onto the saddle bars properly so they give plenty of clearance for the shoulder blade to move. And mainly, if the saddle fits the horse well it will, regardless of where you position it initially, settle into the place it should go. So if the saddle fits it will settle into a good position and not move or hurt the horse. If it doesn’t fit you’ll know it because it will move around a lot, no matter how tight you cinch it down, and if it comes to rest somewhere it won’t be comfortable for you or the horse.
It’s hard to tell from the picture but that seems to be 7/8th rigged? If so you could probably get away without using a back girth, having said that though my old Wade is ¾ rigged and I always rode with a back girth, better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it, and I used to do a little roping. As for the pad, I like wool of about three layers thick; if the tree is good on the horse, once the horse is used to it and ridden regularly the saddle won’t need a great deal of padding there.
Here’s a picture of one of my old work horses with my Wade saddle, just to give you an idea of here a saddle sits. I use it as the standard when I think of saddles as it’s the best thing I have ever sat in and once it’s in place it won’t move on the kind of horse it’s intended for. I must have done thousands of kilometres in it working as a stockman and it never hurt a horses back once. It has ¾ in skirt rigging.
Captain Evil likes this.
     
    01-13-2013, 08:05 PM
  #6
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel1786    
A friend of mine actually has one of these, from what I understand(from what she told me) is that you mold it to your horses back, then saddle up and ride with it as a saddle pad, after about 10 minutes you take it off and you can see any pressure points your saddle is creating because the play dough type stuff inside moves away from the pressure points, so when you unsaddle you know that any thin spots are pressure points, the thinner the area, the more pressure. I hope I explained that right.
Ok, after reading the website more, this might be something different lol
     
    01-13-2013, 10:04 PM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel1786    
Ok, after reading the website more, this might be something different lol
Yeah, I don't think we're talking about the same thing, but what you're talking about sounds pretty cool!
     
    01-13-2013, 10:12 PM
  #8
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnrewPL    
[FONT=Calibri][SIZE=3]
[FONT=Calibri][SIZE=3]It’s hard to tell from the picture but that seems to be 7/8th rigged? If so you could probably get away without using a back girth, having said that though my old Wade is ¾ rigged and I always rode with a back girth, better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it...
The saddle has something called a "Triangle Plate Rig" and the saddler is clear about it needing a second girth. The one which came with the saddle was too small for the Pecheron, so instead of ordering a second one, I use a Y cinch.
I kind of assume it works in a similar way. Loved the picture of your horse and time-tested saddle!
     
    01-13-2013, 10:18 PM
  #9
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Evil    
Yeah, I don't think we're talking about the same thing, but what you're talking about sounds pretty cool!
Ya I posted after looking at the pic, then when I went back to read more I realized it was something different.
This is what my friend has.
ReactorPanel Saddle Company :: Saddle Fitting Tools :: Port Lewis Impression Pad
     
    01-13-2013, 10:24 PM
  #10
Weanling
Yikes! Pricey, but intriguing.
     

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