Saddle pad is rubbing my poor horsie bald-ish
 
 

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Saddle pad is rubbing my poor horsie bald-ish

This is a discussion on Saddle pad is rubbing my poor horsie bald-ish within the Horse Tack and Equipment forums, part of the Horse Tack category
  • Saddle rubs horses back
  • SADDLE PAD RUBBING HORSES HAIR OFF

 
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    03-14-2012, 07:47 PM
  #1
Trained
Saddle pad is rubbing my poor horsie bald-ish

I've noticed that saddle pads are rubbing on my horse's back and seem to be rubbing the hair down/off.

1 - I've checked the saddle fit, it is an excellent fit.
2 - I've had my BO (a saddle distributor) confirm the fit.
3 - I had a third party friend (another saddle distributor) confirm the fit
4 - Lots of saddle pads tend to slip backwards on him
5 - I've tried a few different types of saddle pads and thicknesses

I ride using an English saddle. I've noticed that the saddle pad, under the back end of the saddle (under the panel), when he moves, he's so bendy that he's literally rubbing under the pad. You can hear the pad going "swish swish" very softly as he moves. I've tried this with the pads that claim to mold to the horses back and not slip, as well as a variety of regular pads and combinations thereof.

Does anyone have any suggestions as to either something I can apply to him to prevent irritation or preferably a saddle pad suggestion?
     
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    03-14-2012, 07:51 PM
  #2
Foal
Could you put up a photo of the saddle on him, the pad on him and a photo of his back were it's rubbing him?
     
    03-14-2012, 08:02 PM
  #3
Trained
I can grab some tomorrow.

In the meantime, I snagged a picture from the internet of a horse in english tack and drew where the rubbing is going on.

I can't insert the picture for some reason!

Here's the link:
http://www.horseforum.com/members/25...ntitled-26877/

Look towards the back of the white pad and you'll see the red mark that I drew. It's rubbing him there.



     
    03-15-2012, 01:53 AM
  #4
Yearling
Have you cleaned the pad recently?
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    03-15-2012, 07:04 AM
  #5
Showing
Your saddle may not be cinched tight enough.
     
    03-15-2012, 07:15 AM
  #6
Green Broke
Use mane and tail spray with silicone on the hair (providing its not an open wound)- I can't see the pictures, or use vaseline. I prefer the spray as it lasts longer and makes no mess. The fur then becomes silky and moves rather than being rubbed... good for blankets that rub shoulders etc ;)
     
    03-15-2012, 10:11 AM
  #7
Showing
Can you try a different saddle? The quality of the saddle can make a difference. We don't know your skills, are you in the deepest part of the seat. Is the saddle the right size for you? Just because people sell saddles doesn't mean they understand fit. They are motivated to sell.
     
    03-15-2012, 12:43 PM
  #8
Trained
Thanks for the replies.

I don't let my pads go more than a couple of uses before beingwashed. I prefer to use a clean one each time and generally do.

The saddle is cinched tightly.

I ride in a treeless saddle. I have borrowed a friends high end treeless (an Ansur) and her Limpet brand pad. Less motion but the pad slides BACKWARDS even with the thin no slip pad under. The two distributors in question are friends, they weren't trying to sell me a new saddle, but are experienced. Their "pass" on the fit certainly wasn't a way to get me to buy a new saddle.

It's not an open wound, it's not totally bald either. It looks kind of like a shoulder rub. I will upload pictures tonight since I can't seem to do it from my phone which is what I'm using now.

I trail ride with a little jumping thrown in. My saddle is a treeless close contact jump saddle. Its a 17 inch seat which fits me well. I could take the gullets off but I'd rather he have a channel over his spine.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    03-15-2012, 04:01 PM
  #9
Yearling
The most usual cause of rubbing in this area, in my experience, is the saddle 'wagging' through being too tight behind the shoulder for whatever reason, but if you ride in a treeless that seems unlikely. Unless it's the type with a front arch/gullet plate.

It's still possible though, particularly if you crank the girth really tight. This pulls the front down, accentuating any tendency for the horse to move the saddle rather than under it, and potentially lightening the rear if you tend to either lean forward or spend a lot of time in your stirrups.

Awkward one.

Cavalrytales Blog

PS. The other reason saddles rub in this area is if the horse's back profile changes with a rider on board. If the horse hollows the rear edge of the panel can dig in - it's often a problem with the panel seam in treed saddles. Might be worth getting your saddle fitters to check the pressure difference mid to rear of panel with you up.
     
    03-15-2012, 05:29 PM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by DancingArabian    
I can grab some tomorrow.

In the meantime, I snagged a picture from the internet of a horse in english tack and drew where the rubbing is going on.

I can't insert the picture for some reason!

Here's the link:
http://www.horseforum.com/members/25...ntitled-26877/

Look towards the back of the white pad and you'll see the red mark that I drew. It's rubbing him there.



Hard to say but i'll wait on your photos, it could be his shape..like you saihe is 'bendy' possibly he has a short back ad your saddle/pad may be extending to far back which means it will rub in that spot or when you are on him you may be sitting a little further back and your weight pushes the saddle down which cases pressure in that area.
If you lunge him with his saddle on do you still hear that 'rubbing' noise? Will wait for photos :)
     

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