Tom Thumbs
 
 

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Tom Thumbs

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  • How to tell the difference between a tom thumb and a snaffle bit horseforum
  • French link tom thumb bit define

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    12-28-2012, 08:57 PM
  #1
Green Broke
Tom Thumbs

Hi, I really need to ask a question without having to rack my brain any more searching the forum.

Question is......... are all broken mouth shanked bits Tom Thumbs? I thought I read on the forum that they indeed are not. Something about the shanks being stationary on a Tom Thumb???

I am wanting to try a snaffle type roller bit with shanks on my mare, but read so many bad things about Tom Thumbs. Doing a bit of research. Thanks!
     
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    12-28-2012, 10:00 PM
  #2
Foal
I think Tom Thumb curbs are more about how straight the shank is, not just the broken mouth piece. Though my brain still can't suss that because that makes every jointed Weymouth a TT by definition, and I'm in NZ so my TT is a half cheek snaffle, basically.


... someone with a brain that survived Christmas should answer this. XD
tinyliny and nvr2many like this.
     
    12-28-2012, 10:03 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Nope. Argentine snaffles, myler comfort snaffles those are two that are not tt's. TT's are straight shanks.
     
    12-28-2012, 10:04 PM
  #4
Yearling
Strictly speaking, they are not all Tom Thumbs. I assume here that you're referring to what we call a TT in the US. What the Aussies and British call a TT is a different bit altogether.

The US TT has straight shanks. Other jointed shanked bits, for example the "Argentine snaffle" has curved shanks. By having straight shanks, the TT is very unforgiving, since there's no "warning" or soft start when you apply pressure. It's pretty much on or off. The curved shanks of other jointed bits gives some warning before the big pressure kicks in.

However, if you play with any jointed, shanked bit, you'll see that the mechanics and the pressure points (bars, tongue, chin, etc) are the same for most of them. Being a direct-reiner, I don't like any of them, because I find the signals confusing and not very direct.

You say you want to try a snaffle-type roller bit with shanks. There is no such thing. A snaffle bit, by definition, has a direct line from your hand to the bit. 1 pound of pressure from you is 1 pound on the bit. Once a bit has shanks, there is more pressure on the horse's mouth than what your hand is applying. Then it is no longer a snaffle - jointed mouthpiece or not. Once you have shanks, the physics, movement, pressure is no longer anything like what a snaffle is.

Why do you want to try a jointed, shanked bit? I'm not saying you shouldn't. Many horses use these bits. Does your horse direct-rein? If so, why not use a true snaffle? If you're currently using a shanked bit, is there a reason you want to go to a jointed one?
     
    12-28-2012, 10:08 PM
  #5
Weanling
Must say I have actually had really great results with copper mouth TT's. I trained a QH mare who was very evasive if I tried to pick up any contact in a regular loose ring or even a hackamore, but the TT made her pick the bit up and really seek out contact. She suddenly picked up neck reining cues with the switch as well, and traveled like an old pro. With other simpler bits she was a trainwreck and extremely strung out.

Just my two cents. Not all bits are death devices if they are used in the right hands.
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nvr2many likes this.
     
    12-28-2012, 10:24 PM
  #6
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by freia    
Strictly speaking, they are not all Tom Thumbs. I assume here that you're referring to what we call a TT in the US. What the Aussies and British call a TT is a different bit altogether.

The US TT has straight shanks. Other jointed shanked bits, for example the "Argentine snaffle" has curved shanks. By having straight shanks, the TT is very unforgiving, since there's no "warning" or soft start when you apply pressure. It's pretty much on or off. The curved shanks of other jointed bits gives some warning before the big pressure kicks in.

However, if you play with any jointed, shanked bit, you'll see that the mechanics and the pressure points (bars, tongue, chin, etc) are the same for most of them. Being a direct-reiner, I don't like any of them, because I find the signals confusing and not very direct.


You say you want to try a snaffle-type roller bit with shanks. There is no such thing. A snaffle bit, by definition, has a direct line from your hand to the bit. 1 pound of pressure from you is 1 pound on the bit. Once a bit has shanks, there is more pressure on the horse's mouth than what your hand is applying. Then it is no longer a snaffle - jointed mouthpiece or not. Once you have shanks, the physics, movement, pressure is no longer anything like what a snaffle is.

Why do you want to try a jointed, shanked bit? I'm not saying you shouldn't. Many horses use these bits. Does your horse direct-rein? If so, why not use a true snaffle? If you're currently using a shanked bit, is there a reason you want to go to a jointed one?
I know there is no such thing as a snaffle with a shank, was just trying to describe it so you could get a visual. Also, new horse, trying out lots of different bits is why I want to try one. She is a biggggggggggggggg Trakehner that pushes through a snaffle. I tried a D ring french link, no way jose', and then back to the copper mouth curb, its ok but still not right. So going to try this.......................



And research is just what I do. I find out everything I can so I go in knowing as much as I can about something, hence the question. Also she has a 6.5" mouth so I cannot just go out and try any and ever bit out there. I am going to try the ones I can then maybe have Myler make me a better version of the one I like. Thanks.
     
    12-28-2012, 10:30 PM
  #7
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by RunSlideStop    
Must say I have actually had really great results with copper mouth TT's. I trained a QH mare who was very evasive if I tried to pick up any contact in a regular loose ring or even a hackamore, but the TT made her pick the bit up and really seek out contact. She suddenly picked up neck reining cues with the switch as well, and traveled like an old pro. With other simpler bits she was a trainwreck and extremely strung out.

Just my two cents. Not all bits are death devices if they are used in the right hands.
Posted via Mobile Device
Thank you! I really am not an uneducated person. I ask lots of questions so that I will not be, lol. Noting wrong with more info, I am going to keep trying different ones until I find the right one. Its just hard with such a big mouth so its slow going. She neck reins, sticks her tongue out but finding that may just be her. Does not seem to matter what I put in her mouth, lol. But that is the reason I started looking for more tongue relief in the first place. But she is a big girl and not quick to respond so simple snaffle is out! Back to a curb of some kind. I just want her to be as happy as she can be.
     
    12-28-2012, 10:38 PM
  #8
Yearling
The bit you've pictured is not a Tom Thumb. Not sure exactly what it's called, but the shanks are very curved, which makes it a much more forgiving bit than the Tom Thumb.
The french link snaffle is about the mildest thing out there, so if she's going to push through a bit, she would certainly push through that. Have you tried a single-joint snaffle?
My sis-in-law has a horse that completely ignores any snaffle, and doesn't understand what anyone is asking her in any type of shanked bit. She direct-reins. For some reason, she absolutely loves a mullen Kimberwicke. Maybe put that on your list of things to try as well if someone happens to have a 6.5" one laying around (long shot, I know)?
     
    12-28-2012, 10:43 PM
  #9
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by freia    
The bit you've pictured is not a Tom Thumb. Not sure exactly what it's called, but the shanks are very curved, which makes it a much more forgiving bit than the Tom Thumb.
The french link snaffle is about the mildest thing out there, so if she's going to push through a bit, she would certainly push through that. Have you tried a single-joint snaffle?
My sis-in-law has a horse that completely ignores any snaffle, and doesn't understand what anyone is asking her in any type of shanked bit. She direct-reins. For some reason, she absolutely loves a mullen Kimberwicke. Maybe put that on your list of things to try as well if someone happens to have a 6.5" one laying around (long shot, I know)?
Thank you, I didn't think it was but with all the nutcracker remarks and such I really wanted to know more about them. I will put the mullen kimberwick on my list, lol. And yah, hard to find many to try, that are just laying around, lol.
     
    12-28-2012, 11:00 PM
  #10
Yearling
Do you ride English or Western? Trakehner makes me think English... If so, would you be comfortable riding with double-reins? I'm thinking Pelham here... The direct communication of the snaffle with the brakes of the shanks as needed.
     

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