To tree or not to tree, that is the question! - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 24 Old 03-15-2010, 11:54 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 4,138
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShutUpJoe View Post
Some people can't afford $1000 saddles.
Then you buy used. Though quality treeless saddles hold their value well. I paid $1,000 for my used Bob Marshall (would have cost me $1,400 new). You can usually find older treeless saddles or less expensive brands for $350-700 used. My used Black Forest was $400 (it was barely used). You just have to keep your eye open for a good deal. I need a larger seat (17" western), so saddles for me are harder to come by. I snatched both of mine up as soon as I found them .
luvs2ride1979 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 24 Old 03-16-2010, 12:00 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 4,138
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vidaloco View Post
I think it depends on how much you weigh and if you are a good rider.
If your overweight, your not spreading your weight over enough area as a saddle would. Your weight is going to be where your butt bones are and that's it. The use of stirrups can be very dangerous with a bareback pad and some treeless.
SO if your skinny and a good rider, I see nothing wrong with them
That is very NOT true. I am 250+ lbs and so is my husband. We both ride my treeless saddles with good success, from 30 minutes in the arena to 4 hours on the trail. I have also helped more than a few other larger riders go treeless (175 lbs or more). As long as you are balanced good rider (I agree with you there), your horse is conditioned to carry your weight, your horse has good topline muscle, and you buy the right pad(s), then it really doesn't matter what you weigh.
luvs2ride1979 is offline  
post #13 of 24 Old 03-16-2010, 02:06 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Arizona
Posts: 5,248
• Horses: 2
Besides the fact that a saddle that cheap is bound to be cheap on quality, what also worries me is the item descriptions.

They are basically telling you this saddle WILL roll. Don't mount from the ground, use a breast collar to keep it in place, for experience riders only, etc. Just sounds very unstable based on the seller's own item descriptions.

I have never owned a treeless, but I did sit in a Bob Marshal once and thought it was oh-so comfy! If I were going treeless, that is what I would pick for myself.

One other thing on the stability issue. I rode in a bareback pad with stirrups once, and found it to be very dangerous. When you ride with stirrups, you sort of think you can use them, and with the bareback pad with stirrups I felt like if the horse spooked I would slide right off. I actually think it is much safer to ride bareback without stirrups. I can't help but picture a cheaper treeless saddle doing the same thing- rolling right under the horse if you got off balance in the least.

Just my thoughts.
trailhorserider is offline  
post #14 of 24 Old 03-16-2010, 06:13 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: SE Kansas
Posts: 10,620
• Horses: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvs2ride1979 View Post
That is very NOT true. I am 250+ lbs and so is my husband. We both ride my treeless saddles with good success, from 30 minutes in the arena to 4 hours on the trail. I have also helped more than a few other larger riders go treeless (175 lbs or more). As long as you are balanced good rider (I agree with you there), your horse is conditioned to carry your weight, your horse has good topline muscle, and you buy the right pad(s), then it really doesn't matter what you weigh.
I think its not a black and white answer. It depends on the saddle, treed and treeless. Some treed on some horses, if the tree doesn't fit exactly, the weight will never get distributed evenly. Same can be said of a treeless saddle. If the material isn't solid enough, if the stirrups are used to balance off of and the rider is lacking, then the only place the weight is being placed is at the front of the saddle.
I do agree there are some great treeless saddles out there and that it is much easier to deal with saddle fit if there is no tree.


"Until one has loved an animal, part of one's soul remains unawakened..."
- Anatole France
Vidaloco is offline  
post #15 of 24 Old 03-18-2010, 12:40 AM Thread Starter
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: northern arkansas
Posts: 3,100
• Horses: 1
Thanks every one, I rethought about the cheapos and will just wait til I can afford a nicer brand.

I really like the concept of a treeless saddle and they make a lot of sense to me(so be it if that looses me cool points and gains me some hippie points lol), since I don't rope or anything, am not heavy, and IMO am a good rider with great balance. I like that they allow free movement of the muscles and bones in a horses back and have done a lot of research on them to make sure they are not a gimmick which as far as I have found they are not.

Tomahawk has round withers that are low ans a relatively narrow round back, so A) he is nearly impossible to fit properly in a treed saddle, and B) I worry about his back anyway, It is not one of his conformational strong points.

Thanks for all opinions, I really appreciate it. If you have any more or any studies on treeless vs. treed saddles please send them my way!

Ω Horses are a projection of peoples dreams Ω
Honeysuga is offline  
post #16 of 24 Old 03-18-2010, 07:01 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 4,138
• Horses: 3
For his type of back, I'd recommend Sensation, Freeform, and Rebecca Softrider saddles. All do very well on round horses.

The Rebecca saddles are even decently affordable, but they are "interesting" looking and there is a 6-8 month wait on them.
http://www.rebeccatreelesssaddles.co...s/pb288099.jpg

Sensation has a bew "basic" saddle now, the Harmony Element, that is more affordable than their other models. It's $700 Canadian, which right now is $690 US.
Harmony Element
luvs2ride1979 is offline  
post #17 of 24 Old 03-18-2010, 09:47 PM Thread Starter
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: northern arkansas
Posts: 3,100
• Horses: 1
LOL Luvs, that first picture looks EXACTLY like Tom(except he isnt bum high)... I was like"when has he been a horsey model???"

Ω Horses are a projection of peoples dreams Ω

Last edited by Honeysuga; 03-18-2010 at 09:50 PM.
Honeysuga is offline  
post #18 of 24 Old 03-19-2010, 01:15 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: ontario, canada
Posts: 1,566
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvs2ride1979 View Post
That is very NOT true. I am 250+ lbs and so is my husband. We both ride my treeless saddles with good success, from 30 minutes in the arena to 4 hours on the trail. I have also helped more than a few other larger riders go treeless (175 lbs or more). As long as you are balanced good rider (I agree with you there), your horse is conditioned to carry your weight, your horse has good topline muscle, and you buy the right pad(s), then it really doesn't matter what you weigh.
How do you guys mount?? The treeless give even 160 pounders problems mounting?? You are always using a mounting block or trying to find something in the bush??

Also if you get shifted to one side as in a spook the treeless is liable to slip.
Saddles are to spread weight. A normal western saddle has only an honest 60 square inches of area to support weight, the ortho flex I had had 300 square inches to support weight. You should not exceed 1 psi or pound per square inch for a horses back. You are sitting on your butt bones treeless so I feel sorry for the horse and the pressure points.
You couldn't give me a treeless.
RiosDad is offline  
post #19 of 24 Old 03-19-2010, 03:04 PM Thread Starter
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: northern arkansas
Posts: 3,100
• Horses: 1
As usual I respect your opinion Rio, but I have to disagree.

See,
I have learned that a lot of people think a treeless saddle is the same as a bareback pad, that they have no support whatsoever. That is incorrect. Most of the nicer ones have a more rigid design and support panels that distribute a riders weight just as evenly as a regular saddle, without the added stiffens. Plus they have a solid pommel to prevent slipping. With saddle stability it really is not all or nothing, slip or wont slip. There is hard rigid inflexible regular saddles and less rigid, flexible treeless saddles that do not slip but allow the horse to twist and turn and arch its back productively without having to deal with a rigid piece of wood or fiberglass strapped to its back. As has been said, you cannot place a solid inflexible thing between two flexing things and expect there to be no problems...

Just my take on it.

Ω Horses are a projection of peoples dreams Ω
Honeysuga is offline  
post #20 of 24 Old 03-19-2010, 03:41 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 4,138
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by RiosDad View Post
How do you guys mount?? The treeless give even 160 pounders problems mounting?? You are always using a mounting block or trying to find something in the bush??

Also if you get shifted to one side as in a spook the treeless is liable to slip.
Saddles are to spread weight. A normal western saddle has only an honest 60 square inches of area to support weight, the ortho flex I had had 300 square inches to support weight. You should not exceed 1 psi or pound per square inch for a horses back. You are sitting on your butt bones treeless so I feel sorry for the horse and the pressure points.
You couldn't give me a treeless.
I usually mount from a block or stump, no matter what kind of saddle I ride, treed or treeless, english or western. IMO, even light riders should not mount from the ground on a regular basis. It's bad for the horse's back over time, and you can stretch out the stirrup leathers.

I can mount from the ground if necessary. If no one is around to hold my off stirrup for me, then I use a lead rope to aid in mounting. I snap the lead rope to the rigging d-ring on the right side, run the rope down the cinch and between the horse's front legs, then up over the shoulder. Back on the left/mounting side, I hold the lead rope snug along with a big handful of mane in my left hand. The lead rope and mane help stabilize the off side of the saddle while I hop-hop-hop until I can get my butt up there, lol.

I use a horse chiropractor who is also a liscensed vet (she's no hack). She was very anti-treeless before meeting me. Once she saw how good my horses' back condition was, even with all of the miles we put on them, she was very impressed. I use specialized saddle pads and GOOD treeless saddles. I am also a "light" rider. I do not bounce at the sitting trot or canter. My horses backs are never sore after a ride, or the next day after a ride, and I do check religiously. My horses eagerly meet me at the gate, are happy/perky on their rides, and do not rush to get back to the barn.

You should not assume things.
luvs2ride1979 is offline  
Reply

Tags
treeless saddle help

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tree sap back in the crosby again Horse Grooming 14 11-19-2009 11:56 PM
M. Toulouse Tree Size question Starmyst00 Horse Tack and Equipment 3 04-03-2009 12:30 PM
Western saddle tree size question melinda27858 Horse Tack and Equipment 1 12-16-2008 10:36 PM
Tree question appylover31803 Horse Tack and Equipment 10 12-04-2008 06:22 PM
Flex tree kitten_Val Horse Tack and Equipment 2 08-20-2007 08:20 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome