What bit? Kimberwicke? - Page 2
 
 

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What bit? Kimberwicke?

This is a discussion on What bit? Kimberwicke? within the Horse Tack and Equipment forums, part of the Horse Tack category
  • Kimberwick training draft horses
  • Kimberwicke for draft horse

 
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    11-23-2010, 11:20 PM
  #11
Showing
Thank you for that. I know I have very soft hands, that's one of my good points when I ride. I guess I don't really want to buy $200 in draft horse bits and just keep changing it up, only to find she doesn't do well in any! Unless I use the Tom Thumb I posted, I'm going to have to go out and buy a bit because all my other ones are only 5"s. So what should I do? Should I try her in the Tom Thumb, see how she does, and if she's not good in it I buy something else?
     
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    11-23-2010, 11:24 PM
  #12
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by equiniphile    
Thank you for that. I know I have very soft hands, that's one of my good points when I ride. I guess I don't really want to buy $200 in draft horse bits and just keep changing it up, only to find she doesn't do well in any! Unless I use the Tom Thumb I posted, I'm going to have to go out and buy a bit because all my other ones are only 5"s. So what should I do? Should I try her in the Tom Thumb, see how she does, and if she's not good in it I buy something else?
I don't see the harm in trying. If you don't want to try it out on the trail, just try it in a pasture, arena or round pen. Nothing to loose, and you will have a starting point for bit shopping.

You may say "wow, she does great in this" or "nope, she hates it!" Or "she does well but doesn't need all that leverage, so I should get one with shorter shanks."

So I don't see the harm in trying it out. It might be one style of bit you can cross off your list, if nothing else.
     
    11-23-2010, 11:27 PM
  #13
Showing
Thanks! That's my plan then
     
    11-24-2010, 12:08 AM
  #14
Trained
I should clarify WHY I said Tom Thumbs & Kimberwicke bits are evil. Frequently in training situations I see tiny kids on a horse they haven't a prayer of stopping and what's the bit I seem to always see? Tom Thumb or Kimberwicke, to give the tiny kid a hope of coming out with a whole skin. These kids tend to balance on the mouth and haul on the horses mouth for everything. SO I have an instant knee jerk reaction to those bits. I've retrained horses with really hard mouths from kids pulling on those bits and tried to get horses to lighten on the forehand who have learned to balance on those bits and pull on the little kids arms. It's a real pain.

Whoever posted that if you have soft hands the bits are not evil is correct. A bosal can be a torture device in the wrong hands and a spade bit can be just the right bit in a fully trained bridle horse.

I tend to prefer the Myler bits because the way they're constructed, they're designed to do less damage even if someone has a heavier hand.

But
     
    11-24-2010, 12:01 PM
  #15
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
I guess it depends on how you were trained to ride. I come from the western riding world and you'll be hard pressed to find any other curb as mild as a kimberwicke! It is practically as mild a curb bit as you can find!
I am not saying not to use a kimberwicke because they're too harsh but because they're too confusing. Allow me to restate what I have tried to say before: curb = brakes, snaffle = steering. Kimberwickes are typically used in english disciplines wherein it is necessary to maintain a certain level of contact with the horse's mouth. When you use a kimberwicke, the brakes (curb action) are engaged along with the steering (snaffle action) and the result is not good!

Curbs are perfectly fine for western riders on a looser rein with neck reining and seat/leg steering... NOT when you are riding in an english manner with contact and direct reining.

Thus I will repeat; if you need the extra power of the curb while riding english, get a pelham so that you can separate the signals (brakes and steering) and save the horse a lot more frustration and confusion. And make sure you know exactly when to use which signal!

If you do use the tom thumb, just don't use it for direct reining.
     

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