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What Kind Of Bit Do You Perfer?

This is a discussion on What Kind Of Bit Do You Perfer? within the Horse Tack and Equipment forums, part of the Horse Tack category

     
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        05-01-2008, 12:39 PM
      #11
    Foal
    I was raised using low curb bits so that's what I've allways used.

    But lately, I've been trying my two at riding with no bit at all.
    They both neck reign, so that part has gone rather well with them both. And my mare responds well to slowing, or stopping, with an equal pull on both reigns. I haven't gotten her to back-up yet though, so that is something that remains to be seen.

    My big QH, Charley, is a different story..... he might prove to be too head strong, for controling without one. Like I said, he turns just fine. But he takes his own sweet time about slowing and/or stopping.

    I don't know if any of this helps, but there it is.

    DGW
         
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        05-01-2008, 01:24 PM
      #12
    Yearling
    I figured I should elaborate a little.

    What kind do you perfer?
    I prefer a broken bit, with three links and no shanks. Meaning a snaffle that is either a French link, Dr. Bristol or them ones with a bean/oval. I also like mullen mouth or mega-low ported bits with short shanks 5" or shorter. I like loose ring snaffles and egg butts.

    What kind do you think works best?
    I think this severly differs between horses, one of my horses I have to ride in a solid mouth piece and another one of my horses can't stand solid mouth pieces and I have to ride him in a snaffle.

    What do you like about them?
    I like a double jointed snaffle because it does not have the nut-cracker effect on my horses. The nutcracker effect of a single jointed bit is not so noticeable in horses with larger heads/mouths but in horses with petite muzzles like Arabians or Morgans it really can smack them in the roof of the mouth. If I put even slight pressure on my reins his mouth is wide open and I can see the bit pressing on his roof. If I ride in a shanked bit, I like it to be Mullen mouth or with a super ow port for similar reasons. I do not think tongue pressure is necessary to stop a horse. I also like short shanks with a nice deep bend in them. They are gentle and you can use light rein and make communication clear but if someone with heavy hands is riding the bit is also very very gentle if they pull too hard.

    What don't you like about them?
    Nothing really.

    Do you prefer a split or solid bit?

    I like both however I think a double jointed mouthpiece is way more forgiving, however some horses will not work in a broken mouth piece and some will not work in a solid mouth piece and others will work in both.
         
        05-01-2008, 01:45 PM
      #13
    Showing
    Double-jointed snaffle!
    That's interesting about the rubber bit, I've never heard of them. But I guess they would come in handy for a horse with a soft mouth.
         
        05-01-2008, 03:03 PM
      #14
    Started
    Double-jointed snaffles for me too.
         
        05-02-2008, 07:49 AM
      #15
    Yearling
    Quote:
    What kind do you perfer?
    i have always ridden in a snaffle....once I tried a straight bar because my instructor said I had to...(as vince was being a willy-head)...but I have never used one since then

    Quote:
    What kind do you think works best?
    i think just depends on the horse...

    Quote:
    What do you like about them?
    i reckon a snaffle is softer and kinder on the horses mouth.

    Quote:
    What don't you like about them?
    not much....i used to have a tom-thumb snaffle but I found that the bars got in vinces mouth a lot (he used to open his mouth while I was riding him) so ihad to switch to a different type of snaffle (without bars)

    Quote:
    Do you prefer a split or solid bit?
    i prefer split.....def split
         
        05-16-2008, 10:07 PM
      #16
    Weanling
    I use a full cheek copper snaffle on my boy.

    What works best really depends on the horse. We have a couple horses that do fine on a hackamore, and some that need a shanked low port. I think I'm one of the few, other than another boarder, who rides a snaffle, but Hoover has always responded well for it. I see no reason to test him with others since he does will with it.

    I like how gentle it is on him, and doesn't pinch. I also like that it tastes better for him than a regular bit. The full cheeks keep him from pulling his headstall into his mouth, which he will do when bored.

    The only thing I don't like is that he plays with his bit a lot, but he has a very short attention span. I'm looking into getting him a full cheek copper snaffle with a French link roller from Mikmar for my birthday in August.

    Obviously, I like the split. My instructor tends to prefer the solid, particularly the low ports. But as I said, it really depends on what the horse responds to. Hoover is soft, so I can use a gentle bit.
         
        05-17-2008, 04:48 PM
      #17
    Showing
    I think the bit question is and should be horse specific. I will come back later and post a detailed response but I think the milder the better. A well trained horse should be able to be ridden without problems with a snaffle. One of my pet peeves is people over biting their horse.
         
        05-17-2008, 08:38 PM
      #18
    Foal
    I use a french link (with copper link) butterfly bit for my girl. It is a driving leverage bit.

    My girl doesn't do well without the leverage effect. I've tried to work with her a ring snaffle and then a full check, but she does so much better in a leverage on the first setting.

    I ride and drive her in this. She responds well. :)
         
        05-18-2008, 02:43 AM
      #19
    Showing
    Alright, I just watched a 2 hour DVD on these bits, and it sounds like something that might appeal to you and your horse:
    http://www.mikmar.com/
    My original reaction to seeing this bit was "yikes, put THAT in a horse's mouth? Uhh, no!" but over the course of the video I became more and more impressed with them.
    HOWEVER - if you don't have soft hands (be honest with yourself) then this isn't the right bit for you.
    Other than these bits, maybe a Myler, or if you're looking more conventionally, then a french link?
         

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