What is this thing? (Bit) - Page 2
 
 

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What is this thing? (Bit)

This is a discussion on What is this thing? (Bit) within the Horse Tack and Equipment forums, part of the Horse Tack category
  • Tom thumb nit

 
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    08-10-2010, 01:39 AM
  #11
Started
Nevermind that, I answered my own questions!
     
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    08-10-2010, 12:58 PM
  #12
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by corinowalk    
Not to be nit-picky but technically, it is a tom thumb. Its even advertised as one. Milepost Tom Thumb Horse Bit with Copper & Stainless Mouth - 4007452 | Tractor Supply Company

Again, not a bad bit...one of my favorites to be honest.
Just because it's labeled as one, doesn't mean it works at all like one. From what i've read and researched, it doesn't function anything like a traditional Tom Thumb bit.

It may be marketed as one, but since it works in a completely different way, it isn't one. I can say that with 99% certainty after researching the matter further. It peaked my interest that Tractor Supply (Or rather, that particular manufacturer) had it labeled as a Tom Thumb. Just another example of ignorance and (of?) marketing. I guess it's better than labeling a true Tom thumb as something else.

Not all jointed Curb bits are Tom Thumbs, but it would seem from what i'm gathering that practically anything with a jointed mouthpiece and shanks are labeled as Tom Thumbs for the sake of marketing. The truth of the matter is, this particular bit is not going to function anything like a tom thumb bit, therefore I am going to say it's not a Tom Thumb, whether or not the manufacturer wants to call it one.

At any rate, I used it on her today and she went well in it. It gave her something new to think about, and it didn't slide through her mouth (obviously) so that was great! She did have her first EVER try at being a bucking bronco, but I think that was because she was given her head at the canter and has nothing to do with the bit
     
    08-11-2010, 10:53 AM
  #13
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squeak    
Just because it's labeled as one, doesn't mean it works at all like one. From what i've read and researched, it doesn't function anything like a traditional Tom Thumb bit.

It may be marketed as one, but since it works in a completely different way, it isn't one. I can say that with 99% certainty after researching the matter further. It peaked my interest that Tractor Supply (Or rather, that particular manufacturer) had it labeled as a Tom Thumb. Just another example of ignorance and (of?) marketing. I guess it's better than labeling a true Tom thumb as something else.

Not all jointed Curb bits are Tom Thumbs, but it would seem from what i'm gathering that practically anything with a jointed mouthpiece and shanks are labeled as Tom Thumbs for the sake of marketing. The truth of the matter is, this particular bit is not going to function anything like a tom thumb bit, therefore I am going to say it's not a Tom Thumb, whether or not the manufacturer wants to call it one.
Exactly. I hate traditional tom thumbs, this bit though I'm fine with and would even consider using.
     
    10-25-2010, 02:18 PM
  #14
Weanling
I have a question about the bit on this thread and one im looking at.

I just read a big thing about why tom thumbs are bad. It had said it confuses the horse because when you pull the rein (like if you want to turn left) to the left the top of the shank would apply pressure while the other side shank would be putting pessure on the right.

1.Assuming the horse is to work away from pressure, wouldnt this confuse the horse as to what pressure to move away from?

2. Why wouldn't the bit on this thread cunfuse the horse this way?

This is the bit I'm looking at:


My question about the bit above is even though it has that "tom thumb look" would it do the same thing as the bit that you guys are talking about?
     
    10-25-2010, 02:46 PM
  #15
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexischristina    
Not to thread jack, but is it a Western bit? If so, can it be used for English? Safe for jumping?
No. It is not a bit to be direct-reined with.
     
    10-25-2010, 05:08 PM
  #16
Showing
I agree somewhat with Cori. It doesn't look like a bad bit, I just am not personally a fan of broken mouth curbs. Just a personal thing that I don't like how they feel. Squeak, you can give it a try, though I would put my reins on the rings by the mouth for the first few rides just to let her get comfortable with the bit and see if she is going to like it.

I also second what W_S posted. I never use a snaffle without a curb strap on there just to prevent that exact thing. I usually use the thinner leather ones for that though. This is my strap of choice right now. It is fully adjustable with no holes to punch or buckles to fight with.
     
    10-25-2010, 05:50 PM
  #17
Green Broke
I could be wrong, but I do believe that "tom thumb" is simply a general term to describe ANY jointed leverage bit. I know they use the term completely differently in Australia and England?

It may not work with the same nut cracker action but the general idea behind it is still the exact same - it is a leverage bit, not a snaffle. Direct reining will still result in confusing signals. It is STILL a bit without much of a purpose - it's not meant to be straight reined and doesn't have the finesse for precision neck reining.

Saying it's not a tom thumb is like saying a french link is not a snaffle - this is still simply a jointed curb, exactly like a traditional tom thumb and with it's own set of problems and misuses.
     
    10-25-2010, 05:52 PM
  #18
Started
I use this bit and love it!
     
    10-25-2010, 06:06 PM
  #19
Trained
In Australia a Tom thumb is a very mild snaffle similar to a fulmer but with shorter cheek bars :)
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    10-26-2010, 01:04 AM
  #20
Super Moderator
The bit in the photo is nothing more than double jointed Tom Thumb. It works exactly the same, with neither less nor more of the "confusing signals" that was mentioned earlier and is attributed to TT's. I don't care for TT, but that one looks ok, I guess.
I like the shot of WildSpots horse and the way it carries its' simple snaffle. The chin strap (as opposed to Curb strap) is a good idea. I finally added one to my bridle. Especially important if you do much lateral work where you might need to apply a fair amount of lateral pressure (at least initially).
     

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