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Adopting a Mustang

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    05-05-2012, 05:09 PM
  #21
Weanling
Awww, Moose is the perfect name for that guy.
     
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    05-05-2012, 05:23 PM
  #22
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chessie    
Awww, Moose is the perfect name for that guy.
He truly looked like a moose. He is a super sweet boy. I haven't seen him in a long time, but hopefully his body began growing into his head. Haha!
     
    05-05-2012, 05:41 PM
  #23
Weanling
So here's what I'm looking for so far.

Temperment: I'm looking for a horse that is calm and steady even if the horses around him start acting funny. I don't want to see signs of aggression or excessive nervousness. I'm looking for a low calm head, relaxed ears, and relaxed neck. I want a horse that looks toward a strange sound, and at best shows a little interest in what I'm doing, but that's probably not going to be too likely after what the poor thing has been through. I don't want to see excessive pawing, bobbing, or bullying of the other horses.

Conformation: I'm looking for a horse that in the body has a nice balanced, square shape with a good line on the back and sturdy legs. Each part should look like it fits with the rest with no extremes in shapes or sizes. I'm looking for legs that aren't turned in or out, and not bowed.

Overall health: Even though the horse looks rangy, I should see some life and power in it. I want to see bright, alert eyes, and no signs of pain if he is walking or trotting around the pen. Even if the coat is dirty, I want to see healthy skin and hooves.

Age: 3-4 years

Gender: Gelding is preferable, but if that is not an option, I'd consider a mare so long as she has been in BLM custody long enough to ensure she isn't pregnant.

Height: 14-15 hands

Color: I honestly really, really don't care. I'd like to find a horse with a soft eye and a pretty face. If I had my druthers, I'd choose a buckskin, black, or a pretty bay. I like cute features like socks and nice manes. Lately I've been attracted to grays with dark manes for some strange reason, but really, if the horse was all, plain mud brown and fit my other criteria, I'd be happy.

That's my list so far.
xxdanioo, ThisHorseGirl and enh817 like this.
     
    05-05-2012, 05:41 PM
  #24
Banned
I think it's great! I adopted two of them and they are smart and gorgeous and amazing. It is very difficult when you go to an adoption area as there are so many of them in each pen and some are just crazed with fear and the way the BLM people get them into chutes for loading them creates a very chaotic and terrifying atmosphere for the horses.

I think the whole thing (wild horse round ups etc.) is terrible and went to an adoption just to observe how the mustangs were being treated but adopted one out of pity and then got her the bay type she seemed to like in the pen with her. I am glad I did. Don't let anyone tell you they are pukes or ugly or whatever. Trust me, compared to my neighbors thoroughbreds and quarter-horse they are dancing, brilliant dream horses.

I was lucky and got to take them to my own property where I gently tamed them and let them learn to trust me and then got a certified trainer to come to my place and work with them. They learn so fast in the right hands it is incredible. They do not need a heavy hand, they are so bright and aware and sensitive and since they come to you without stall vices, or previous poor training etc. you can have high expectations.

My recommendation though would be to keep them with you so they will bond with you first. Even after they are gentled and halter trained etc. I still would not put them with other horses as their herd instinct is really strong. Mine come to me when I call them or just with a gesture even if they are in the farthest pasture. They follow me in a line, they stop when I stop, they are respectful, affectionate and sweet. They are curious. Interested in everything and fun as heck.

One is quite a bit taller than the other, she is a sorrel and so beautiful. The other is a stocky, shorter bay type and their personalities are very different. The bay gives into training quickly as she is "streetwise" and knows that to give in is to get it over with quicker. The sorrel is very sensitive and smart but runs from the trainer when she sees him. I have to be the one to halter her.

Anyway, good luck, be gentle and they are the best horses in the right circumstances.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Chessie    
Hi everyone,

I'm preparing to adopt a BLM Mustang this summer and I'm both excited and nervous. The plan is to have the horse with a trainer that I like and trust for a full year, while I continue to master my skills and prepare myself for taking over.

There's a part of me that has that "What are you doing? This is wild horse we're talking about!" nervousness though.

For the record. The reason I want a Mustang to begin with is because as a military wife, I know what it is like to have to live at the whim of the government. Whether what the BLM is doing is right or wrong, there are horses now that need dedicated owners and good homes, and I have a home to provide and the willingness to be a dedicated owner. I fully acknowledge, I'm probably going to spend thousands of dollars training my "cheap" horse, and that doesn't phase me at all. I'm also not hung up on the "I will tame the wild creature with my love and it will be magic and sparkles." I used to rehab injured birds of prey. I have a healthy respect for what "wild" means.

I've been thinking and researching this for months now. I feel in my heart it's the right way to go.

Wish me luck!

And any advice?

Chessie
DRichmond and Back2Horseback like this.
     
    05-05-2012, 07:49 PM
  #25
Weanling
When you get your mustang please post about your experience! One day in the perhaps (very) distant future when I have more experience under my belt, I want to do the same thing. Been a dream since I was little and it never died out...
     
    05-05-2012, 08:28 PM
  #26
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarah4494    
I think it's great! I adopted two of them and they are smart and gorgeous and amazing. It is very difficult when you go to an adoption area as there are so many of them in each pen and some are just crazed with fear and the way the BLM people get them into chutes for loading them creates a very chaotic and terrifying atmosphere for the horses.

I think the whole thing (wild horse round ups etc.) is terrible and went to an adoption just to observe how the mustangs were being treated but adopted one out of pity and then got her the bay type she seemed to like in the pen with her. I am glad I did. Don't let anyone tell you they are pukes or ugly or whatever. Trust me, compared to my neighbors thoroughbreds and quarter-horse they are dancing, brilliant dream horses.

I was lucky and got to take them to my own property where I gently tamed them and let them learn to trust me and then got a certified trainer to come to my place and work with them. They learn so fast in the right hands it is incredible. They do not need a heavy hand, they are so bright and aware and sensitive and since they come to you without stall vices, or previous poor training etc. you can have high expectations.

My recommendation though would be to keep them with you so they will bond with you first. Even after they are gentled and halter trained etc. I still would not put them with other horses as their herd instinct is really strong. Mine come to me when I call them or just with a gesture even if they are in the farthest pasture. They follow me in a line, they stop when I stop, they are respectful, affectionate and sweet. They are curious. Interested in everything and fun as heck.

One is quite a bit taller than the other, she is a sorrel and so beautiful. The other is a stocky, shorter bay type and their personalities are very different. The bay gives into training quickly as she is "streetwise" and knows that to give in is to get it over with quicker. The sorrel is very sensitive and smart but runs from the trainer when she sees him. I have to be the one to halter her.

Anyway, good luck, be gentle and they are the best horses in the right circumstances.
where did you go to look at these horses that they were in pens crazed with fear from the chutes, etc.??

Also - OP, where are you located?
     
    05-06-2012, 04:53 AM
  #27
Banned
It was in Ohio. I have moved them to Washington State recently. Here's a video if you would like to see what happens to these poor beasts. They are equally terrorized at adoptions. A disgrace to our nation. Inexcusable. And why do you ask?

Video of US wild horse capture branded animal cruelty by activists | The Observers
     
    05-06-2012, 05:55 AM
  #28
Weanling
Good luck on finding a new horse!

Don't want to hi-jack your post but can I ask why mustangs seem to get such a bad rap? Here in New Zealand we have Kaimanawa horses which are a small stocky wild horse, there are frequent musters and auctions to keep the numbers down.
     
    05-06-2012, 07:01 AM
  #29
Banned
I don't know to whom you are addressing your question/comments to but I am game to answer. Here in the USA we have cattle ranchers that have a lot of lobbying power with the government. This would include Ken Salazar, the current United States Secretary of the Interior which encompasses the Bureau of Land Management, and who was himself a "cattle man". These cattle ranchers get to free range their animals on our public lands for a nominal fee and allegedly mustangs compete with them for food and space. The sheer gall of them!

The mustangs, as with nearly all animals left to nature, will control their own population through survival of the fittest, ie: availability of food, weather, predators (again, animals that the BLM disapproves of due to potential predation on CATTLE), water sources etc. Thus they "must" be removed in great numbers via incredibly harsh and cruel methods, to areas in the Midwestern US per the BLM (and greedy cattle lobbyists) and some self aggrandizing citizens of the USA who love cattle and believe whatever they are told regarding them. Many sub-par trainers, horse breeders, dressagers, QH adorers etc. disparage the mustang probably because the mustang does not profit them personally. They call them pukes, ugly, worthless, and names I won't repeat. Hogwash!

Mustangs in fact, are intelligent, wily, curious, stunningly beautiful beings that have earned their place on the ever dwindling wild places of this country. They have earned it far more nobly and honestly than the humans that seek to remove them. If left alone they do not over populate as cattle do, are clever enough to know not to over graze any one area, and are a rare and special treat to see in the wild, as cattle are not.

The plight of the mustang is part of the agenda for Salazar and his ilk to convince us that wild horses and their natural predators are a blight on this country.Cattle ranchers' greed supersedes the wishes of the vast majority of US citizens that want mustangs, bears, cougars and wolves to be left to their own devices because cattle=dollars=votes for politicians. We, the public, are required to pay for every cow/bull killed on our public lands by a natural predator. Please note that the cattle that enrich the pockets of the very few are trampling the lands of American citizens that have shown time and again through letters, votes, and petitions that they support wild mustangs, wolves, and other wild creatures far more than they support lining the pockets of lobbyists, ranchers and politicians.

Ummmm...did that answer your question? If not, Google "mustang round ups" and see the horrific events for your self. And if you like, just Google "wild horses" and see their beauty for yourself. :)
     
    05-06-2012, 07:28 AM
  #30
Weanling
Mustangs are awesome- going to a holding facility will make your list difficult to use. Ours drove us around in a truck for a bit. Most just acted indifferent and walked away. I think maybe age, conformation and color are as good as you are going to get. If crimsonsky gets on here she could probably help you a lot. Mares can have buns in the oven my girl just had a cute little red dun stud colt... Wild must not be genetic though because he is a little love bug. My mare is cautious but accepting to me. I also think she is beautiful. I have a yard full of purebred horses, and she is the one everyone notices first. To each their own I guess. I wish you the best of luck in your search and decision. Take care- and
Thank you for wanting to own an American legend'
Posted via Mobile Device
crimsonsky and sarah4494 like this.
     

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