AdoptingCharlotte
 
 

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AdoptingCharlotte

This is a discussion on AdoptingCharlotte within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        03-29-2012, 09:58 AM
      #1
    Foal
    Red face AdoptingCharlotte

    I truly respect the "horse-people" that talk on this site. I volunteer at an Equine Rescue Impound one day a week. I have done so for over a year now. I have been very strong about not adopting one of the many needy horses that have come through. All have been adopted thankfully though we are not allowed to know how they are doing - not the volunteers -anyway. The Impound is under the jurisdiction of our Department of Agriculture. Everything is kept very "hush,hush" from the volunteers who in reality keep the place running and bring the horses back to being adoptable. I have now fallen in love - DEEPLY - with the newest horse to show up at our facility. She is PITIFUL@ present, but in my eyes will be GORGEOUS eventually. If anyone is old enough to remember the movie "Flicka" (the original one) with Roddy McDowell she looks just like the horse that played the part. The volunteers are not allowed to know anything about these horses: where they come from, their breed, their age, their health history NOTHING except their name if they have one. Her name is Charlotte. I am very experienced with horses having had 2 for 23 & 19 yrs. I am way "over-the-hill" however & am not sure I should take this lovely angel on. We don't know if she can even be ridden. Does anybody think it would be a good idea to have a DNA test on her maybe to at least find out her breeding when I have my Vet check her out? Would appreciate any feedback. Thanks
         
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        03-29-2012, 10:14 AM
      #2
    Showing
    Can I ask why you think her breed is important? It seems such a random thing to be concerned with, since from your description this girl is in physically bad shape.

    If you're seriously considering adopting her, whatever breed she might be should be immaterial. I do agree with a thorough vetting including blood work, to try and head off any potential genetic or congenital problems.
         
        03-29-2012, 11:22 AM
      #3
    Green Broke
    I'm not sure how much DNA testing is, but I would .. what the heck, huh?

    Good luck with her and take lots of pics of her progress .. pretty soon, you won't be able to remember how bad she looked and how fast she progressed.

    Bless you for loving her...
         
        03-29-2012, 11:32 AM
      #4
    Showing
    *Moderator Note*

    Please keep responses civil and not personal. Questions are asked and opinions expressed, that is the nature of a forum.
         
        03-29-2012, 11:33 AM
      #5
    Showing
    TB, I did work in rescue and it's very hard NOT to fall in love with the horse, or 2, or several. Since the horse just got into rescue (from what I understand) personally I'd wait till it gets some weight, and they'll evaluate the training and possible health issues with her. Only after that I'd make my decision on adopting her. It may sound mean, but some of the rescue horses will need endless money investments, some are screwed to the point of being untrainable or unridable (IF you plan on riding), etc.
    texasgal and DraftyAiresMum like this.
         
        03-29-2012, 01:20 PM
      #6
    Trained
    There are rescue horses in my area as well
    Both were neglected by a Vet so sad
         
        03-30-2012, 12:16 PM
      #7
    Foal
    adopting Charlotte

    I'm truly sorry I ever posted this thread. Non of the responses rec.d have been helpful especially Speed Racer.
         
        03-30-2012, 12:28 PM
      #8
    Showing
    Although you may not have liked Speed Racer's reply, it really was not out of line and one that I though as well. If you fell in love with this horse, what is the difference what her breeding is? If you actually owned her, then I can see the desire to know.

    Aside from that, and as for your question, when you say you are "over the hill" I'm not sure what that means and how it would affect your ability to handle this horse long term.

    Were it me (and I'm 65) I wouldn't hesitate to take her home if I felt that about her. I would have her vetted first just to be sure I wasn't getting in over my head medically.
         
        03-30-2012, 12:32 PM
      #9
    Showing
    Is it really that important that the horse be ridden? I'm with my horses as often as possible and sometimes we just hang out. Ie a chair and reading material and just be with them. It's funny how when a book occupies a human's minds the horses chose that time to get nosey. I don't attempt communication but will move one away if he gets pushy. I'd base my decision on what the vet has to say after his examination. She may have health issues that will consume your wallet. If she has stolen your heart then I wish you the best with her.
         
        03-30-2012, 12:56 PM
      #10
    Trained
    You say that you respect the horse people on this site and are wanting ANY advice, but when advice is given, you are the one that is being disrespectful.

    None of the posts qualify as "unhelpful" in my book.

    Speedracer makes valid points. She suggested bloodwork. What if she has a bacterial infection? Kidney failure? Is hypp H/H? That's just to name a few. Knowledge is power and the more information you get, the better the decision can be made for both you and the horse.

    KittenVal suggests waiting until the horse has weight put on. With you working in a rescue for so long, id think youd know that horses that come in, arent the same as when they leave. I've rescued many sweet and loving horses 300 pounds underweight. When they started gaining weight and felt better, the true colors came out and many of them were complete b*tches. I had a 3 year old back me into a corner of a stall. Her butt pressed me into the corner and I couldnt get out. If she started kicking, id have been seriously hurt, if not killed.

    Also, once she's healthy again, whos to say she doesnt have some type of debilitating injury or malformation that will appear? Calcium deposits. Hoof injury. Etc.

    And if you really love this horse, breed doesnt matter. Say she's a qh and not a tb? If she's prefect in every other way then would you not adopt her just based off her breed?
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