Am I a bad rider or is he just a difficult horse? - Page 2
   

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Am I a bad rider or is he just a difficult horse?

This is a discussion on Am I a bad rider or is he just a difficult horse? within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        05-01-2013, 11:51 PM
      #11
    Weanling
    Yeah, that's a good idea GallopingGuitarist. I'm also going to try to not get off of him in the same spot every time too, different spots each time to keep him from getting the habit. And I'm the only one who rides him, I'm basically training him to be sold, which I had no idea until today. I'm a little sad because I've worked hard on him and I hate to see him go. I know it sounds like he has problems, but he was much worse. He had no ground manners and loved to buck and was cinchy and liked to raise his leg at you when walking behind. Now he's a lot better, he just has a few riding problems that need to be worked out. All this hard work and he's leaving . They didn't say whether or not they were buying him, and I don't think they will because they were buying it for their teenage daughter and when she rode him she had more problems than I did! You cannot be gentle or passive with this horse. You have to have a firm hand with him, I mean I'm not really rough with him, you just have to remind him you're the rider and he's the horse.
         
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        05-02-2013, 12:00 AM
      #12
    Green Broke
    How often are you riding him?

    Sometimes horses just need work. I know when I used to ride my horse after a long break he wouldn't do anything right, but given some regular work they get it back pretty quickly.

    I'd probably work on lots of circles rather than just trying to keep him to the rail. Too many horses seem to "learn" to ride to the rail (or away from it when suits them). Get him going where you want him to and keep him guessing, keep changing so he has to pay attention and when he tries to drop out then ride him harder, change things up.
         
        05-02-2013, 12:21 AM
      #13
    Weanling
    The arena is exactly big, I mean it's not really small but it's on the smaller size so he needs to ride on the rail in order to make a good circle and give me plenty of room for maneuvers, and his version of a circle is small haha.

    I ride him almost every day, but he had all last week off so that could be the problem too. We'll see how he does tomorrow. And someone said he could be dropping his shoulder, he could be and think that's one of the problems. I don't think it's my legs because I am conscious of my legs when I ride and where they are and where my toes are pointed because I do use spurs.
         
        05-02-2013, 12:32 AM
      #14
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Horse racer    
    And someone said he could be dropping his shoulder, he could be and think that's one of the problems. I don't think it's my legs because I am conscious of my legs when I ride and where they are and where my toes are pointed because I do use spurs.
    That was me. My horse used to act like a broken trolley. He was just dropping his shoulder cause he didn't know any better. It's kind of like asking someone that also slouches to sit up tall. It feels weird and takes awhile to enforce the new posture.

    Same with dropped shoulder. You need to get him more balanced on his feet, instead of putting it all on the inside.

    How I worked with Sky when I went home to visit was to tap his shoulder with either a whip, or (my method) my foot until he was straight and then leave him be. If he slipped again I'd just tap him again. Eventually he got better in just a few sessions. I even noticed him straighter on the lungeline.
         
        05-02-2013, 01:27 AM
      #15
    Weanling
    He seems to stumble every now and then too, so I think you're right about dropping his shoulder and I'll work more on that tomorrow. I felt kind embarrassed today too because the lady and her daughter watched me ride for like 30 minutes and me trying to get control of Dusty and getting frustrated. It put me in a bad mood and it was irritating. Honestly today was the worst he's acted in a while and he had to pick today to be really bad of coarse! Haha, When people want to come watch me! It also irritated me because the lady yelled down at me "you need to keep him on the rail! That's your job!" I was kinda like "No kidding!!! What do you think I'm trying to do!?" Rrrrrr....made me feel stupid :/. But I guess this is all part of becoming a trainer....
         
        05-02-2013, 01:55 AM
      #16
    Super Moderator
    Just out of curiousity, why do they want you to keep him on the rail all the time? Wouldn't it make him a better horse and you a better rider to be able to move him anywhere in the arena? Do circles and things without the support of that wall?
    Skyseternalangel likes this.
         
        05-02-2013, 02:10 AM
      #17
    Green Broke
    Circles don't need to be big, even in small arenas you can ride various 15/20m circles, figure eights, serpentines. Practice riding straight lines, then make deliberate turns, then ride straight etc. Constant change is great for horses.
         
        05-02-2013, 02:21 AM
      #18
    Weanling
    I want him on the rail because like I said, it's a small arena. And when he's not on the rail he just runs around aimlessly. He doesn't go in just a smaller circle, he cuts across the middle and cuts corners and goes here and there and most importantly won't listen and he tries to resist the rail for some reason. I don't work him on the rail all the time and he can do circles and things without support of the wall. I mean, I don't want him against the rail completely, but I really want him to follow the general pattern of the arena instead of cutting the corners and trying to go through the middle. He needs to stay in a consistent circle or oval, not creating his own path that is different each time around the arena. Kinda make sense?

    I'm going to try what you suggested tinyliny tomorrow when I work with him and also see if he really is dropping his shoulder and try fixing that.
         
        05-02-2013, 03:24 AM
      #19
    Foal
    I felt the same way after my last lesson!
    We just had a terrible ride and I was very upset! But it also reminded me how much we still have to improve :)
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        05-02-2013, 03:27 AM
      #20
    Weanling
    What is going to be his dicapline? Is he going to be a childs horse or dressage? Or trail?

    QH live for ages we have a 30 yr old that's in work (dressage) and small sporting events is his limit now, he can jump and do barrals but its not fair on his front knees as he has arthritus
    He will be in retirement this yr.
    See if this was my horse, I wouldnt be botherd in what he can do in the arena,
    Id be focused on taking him out on trails, relistically he's 23 yrs old and is a senior, depending on his health and work is whether he will be in retirement early or late, but this is just my opinion
         

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