am i doing the right thing?
   

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am i doing the right thing?

This is a discussion on am i doing the right thing? within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Am i supposed to lock up my pony at night
  • is this horse skinny

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  • 1 Post By tinyliny
  • 1 Post By BarrelracingArabian

 
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    07-23-2012, 03:26 AM
  #1
Green Broke
am i doing the right thing?

Alright so I have been riding at this barn for the past 6ish years and in the last year 3 horses in particular have gone way downhill. Now ust recently(5 months) they have really started to try and fix it, however the oldest, a 35+ yr old arab is dangerously skinny, they just had a vet out to see him but all he did was feel his teeth and bump him to 15Pounds of equine senior a day nad 15 pounds of hay ( he hardly eats as he has few teeth so I feel this will not help). Well a lady posted a picture of said horse and many people were angered but my bo who claims me as her 'daughter' and I bend over baackwards for called me threatening to have me arrested for being an 'acomplise" (sp?) however I didn't know of the picture till she told me. So I have been battling wether to leave for awhile now and after these recent events I've pretty much decided its my time to leave but is it the right thing to do? Also hows a polite way of telling a bo you aren't going to be coming back?
     
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    07-23-2012, 04:09 AM
  #2
Foal
Do you keep a horse there or just ride there? Personally I would stop going... if you disagree with the way that the horses are being looked after I don't really see what else you can do. This just recently happened with me and I spent all my time worrying about the horses that weren't even mine! As 'daughter' maybe you could speak to the BO about it, but this sounds like it might cause another arguement!

I would say that you are doing the right thing :) you've got 2 choices on what to say, be honest with them about it or lie haha! If you're not going to see them when you're out riding, perhaps tell them you can't afford it any more or something?

I hope you work something out!
     
    07-23-2012, 04:28 AM
  #3
Foal
Are these horses going down hill due to lack of general care or are they going down hill because of health issues that they are trying to resolve. If a horse is having problems eating because of lack of teeth you can get a hay pellet (I like alpha pellets personally) soak it in water it will soften and the older guys or those without teeth can easily eat it.

I think it is always a sensitive issue when horses are going down hill, sometimes despite our best efforts we simply loose the battle. Owning a senior horse myself who at any given point in time can look like skin and bones despite the vets and I's best efforts I am sensitive to this subject. My neighbors across the street have horses that look at hay and get fat/obese simply do not understand a horse that has a hard time gaining or maintaining weight. They have since learned that Mia is a rescue that has issues with weight but for a while they were snapping pictures and keeping a log.

I think that your OB (I'm not familiar with this term?) is lashing out at you. Which I am sorry to hear because it is not the right course of action. For some of us there is a lot of guilt associated with horses not doing well. Even if we are trying our best. If someone took a picture of Mia last winter then posted it on the internet, most people would immediately assume that I was a horrible person that starved my animals. As an instructor this would very much effect my business and income, I would be less then pleased especially if the poster knew I was having the vet out doing regular checks and following his orders. A vet should know better then us the proper way to put weight on a horse. If that is what he recommended and that is what they are following I don't see how they could be doing wrong. Seniors especially can have a hard time putting weight back on it is often a very slow process, it is also unhealthy and hard on the horse to put weight back on too fast.

If you are uncomfortable at the barn you at I think it is a good idea to look around and see if you can find a new one better suited to your wants and needs. I keep thinking your OB must be a riding instructor? If that is the case I don't see anything wrong with having a frank talk that you are ready to school under someone else to expand your knowledge base. (That is how I would phrase it) I have sent many students on to other instructors I don't find it offensive I find it to be a good and healthy thing. The more good horse people you can find to trainer under the more you will improve.
     
    07-23-2012, 04:41 AM
  #4
Started
Why in the heck would she accuse you of being an accomplice. Am I missing something? Do you do the feeding or something?

I also wanted to add that I have a 27 year old mare. If she goes off her feed, it takes only a few days for her to drop weight enough to be visibly noticeable. Basically, one week of her going off her feed can leave her looking like crap and it takes several weeks to get her back. Now of course, if a horse won't eat it's feed then, uping it won't help. If it were me, I'd try soaking the feed. The horse may be having trouble chewing it. If that didn't work, I'd try switching brands. Also, I don't know how many feedings they are doing a day, but a senior horse that has to eat that much feed, has to have it broken up to several meals a day.

Those senior horses can be tricky. However, if there isn't anything wrong with them, there is no reason for them being a sack of bones. My granny horse just went off her Dumor senior....of course I tried everything to get her back on it. I ended up switching to Triple Crown Senior. I don't know why, but she just up and decided she won't be eating anymore Dumor.

The reason I am passing this info on to you is that hopefully you can share it with the BO. I know you are ready to move on and I think that is the right decision. I hope that you will share this info with your BO, though, for the horses sake.
     
    07-23-2012, 05:26 AM
  #5
Foal
You really have to weigh up the benefits and disadvantages of working there. If it were me personally, I would make my best efforts to move onto bigger and better things - but that's just me personally.

As for resignation, a written letter is always best and legal.
     
    07-23-2012, 11:17 AM
  #6
Yearling
Get out.

You can't fix those horses, they aren't yours. The people who own them have the responsibility to fix them. Its not hard to destinguish a skinny horse from a healthy horse. Your BO new this was happening, so don't let her guilt you into "its your fault".

I left a barn a couple months ago because 4 mares were old as dirt and weren't being cared for properly. As the trainer and co-manager, I stepped in and got these horses a farrier trim (they hadn't had one in 3 years!) and had my @ss reamed by the BO. "Why did you spend that money?! They are useless and don't do anything!" I told the BO that I scheduled the vet because they looked terrible (extremely skinny, long, scruffy fur, ect) and told her that if the vet couldn't do much, I'd like her permission to put them down. She was furious and had me cancel the appointment.

So I left. In caring for an animal that is that ill, malnourished and suffering, in essence, you are allowing it to happen. I couldn't have my named attached to that farm if animal control was called (you can see these horses from the road) and I wasn't allowed to do anything more than what I had already done, so I left.

If you WORK there, simply say "Thanks for the opportunity, but its time for me to move on". You don't have to go into an explination. If you simply ride there, just don't come back. If she asks, reply "I found another barn. Thanks though." If you board there, give her your 30 days notice. No reasoning is required.

She is already pointing fingers and spreading the blame because now the heat is on her. Get out before it gets messy and she drags you down with her. She will either pin you for these horse's care, or she will blame you for what people are saying about her. Either way, it will not end well at all.

Just leave, and be quick about it.
     
    07-23-2012, 01:05 PM
  #7
Green Broke
I have been leasing there for the paat 5 years and I help do pens and feed whenever I am out there but also am assigned feeding on Saturday. She pointed her finger at me because my trainer posted the picture and she assumed I had something to do with it, I didnt. Now all of this doesnt matter I suppose as last night she showed up witg my box and tried to lie to my mom amd say somebody changed the locks and left my box outside the gate ( she owns the ranch and is the only one who has the authority to change locks) then said outlaw will be going to the sales. So I didnt get all my stuff back( will be going out there and getting it) and she is lieing to everyone about me. The arab in question is 35+ yrs old and has been suffering for weight for awhile and just now is she getting a vet out( also he doesn't like soaked feed because she was pumping him with beat pulp equine senior and alfalfa pellet mash) the second horse I question is a 20 ish year old tb mare who has a massive hay belly but looks very sunken in anyway. These horses do not get routine vet care, only when it is absolutely necessary and they got shots the first time in 5+ years for some this year( she takea these horses everywhere without their shots) so needless to say I am glad to be out because while my lease horsr looked amazing many others do not.
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    07-23-2012, 02:31 PM
  #8
Yearling
Yeah, I'd run as fast as I could away from that place.

If she still insist that she can't get your things, call the authorities and they will escort you onto the property to retrieve your belongings. She can't keep your things locked up and away from you, that's theft. The police will go so far as to cut the lock if she claims she can't get in.

She sounds like a rather irresponsible business woman without much regard for the animals she keeps.
     
    07-23-2012, 02:44 PM
  #9
Super Moderator
Well, your decision is made for you; time to go.

But, with regard to the 35 year old toothless arab; isn't there a time when it's best to let them go? I mean , if it is toothless , in the wild, that would be an indicator that that horse had reached the end of it's life, and every life has a limit. I realize this isn't "the wild" but still, isnt' there a time when you say that the horse has reached it's limit and it's "time".? How long do you feed a toothless horse gruel? I know I sound heartless, but I am wondering about this.

There was an old toothless arab at our barn. I think he was about 34. He was pretty thin and required several blankets to manage his outdoor life for the winter, was a bit wobbly on his feet, and yet the owner kept him alive. I think the winters were really hard on him, so I wonder why she didn' either put him down or move him to a stall (which for a hrose with a lifetime of freedom would have been miserable).
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    07-23-2012, 03:10 PM
  #10
Green Broke
No I agree with you completelu tiny. I don't ser the spark.i used to in his eyes and it makes me sad but I guess ill just move on and I havr other placea to ride already have 3 possible leases so I just hope all goes well.
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