Anyone else noticed this about horse books?
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Talk

Anyone else noticed this about horse books?

This is a discussion on Anyone else noticed this about horse books? within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

    Like Tree2Likes
    • 2 Post By bsms

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        05-05-2012, 06:17 AM
      #1
    Yearling
    Anyone else noticed this about horse books?

    I was rereading a few schooling and training books I have since i've been jumping Shaggy a little and I was reading about the half halt, shoulder in, and all that kind of stuff in flat work and I noticed the books tell you all about what it is, why you use it ,and what it does while you ride but not once does any of these books tell you how do preform it or what rider aids you need to do that tells your horse what to do. I find it kind of frustrating that the books (at least the ones I have) don't even tell you how to collect or extend your horse but as a whole page on what collection and extension is. Which is great but what good is it if you doesn't tell you what aids and signals to use to get you horse to understand what you want.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        05-05-2012, 06:39 AM
      #2
    Showing
    Yeah I've noticed a lot of books do that.. they want to discourage you from book learning rather than finding an instructor, I believe.

    Just a hunch
         
        05-05-2012, 10:19 AM
      #3
    Trained
    If I could own only one book on riding, it would be:

    Http://www.amazon.com/American-Military-Horsemanship-Cavalry-through/dp/1420855522/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1336227160&sr=8-1

    The second half is the US Cavalry Manual from the 1940s. It can be a hard read at times because it is hard to describe on paper what a person does on horseback, but it goes into detail on how to cue your horse, the various aids available, etc. It is written from an English saddle perspective, but it isn't hard to translate some of that to a western horse/saddle. And like any Army manual I've seen, it is very much a "do this" approach...
    shaggy and With Grace like this.
         
        05-05-2012, 10:51 PM
      #4
    Foal
    My guess would be that books don't really give a 'how to' on training with your horse because every horse is SO different, that not any one method works for all of them. Because every horse is unique in how they learn things, teaching methods have to be modified to fit the particular horse. For example in my lessons sometimes I ride a horse that completely responds to the indirect rein. The problem with that is, that she ONLY responds to the indirect rein! If she decides its time to duck into the middle of the arena at the canter, I actually have to put her back on the rail with the inside rein without using the outside at all. On a normal horse, you would use both the outside rein and the inside indirect rein, as well as inside leg. If they put in a book to use outside rein that horse would then do a large 360. (Not the goal)
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Just Something I Noticed kalete Horse Talk 2 04-10-2010 02:37 AM
    How to get noticed? NordicJuniper Horse Shows 11 04-05-2010 10:19 PM
    Have you ever noticed... Lori1983 Horse Pictures 9 04-21-2009 05:26 PM
    Noticed a lot of new members...come on over! BluMagic Horse Talk 17 02-25-2008 11:15 PM
    Equestrian Books - latest Horse Books & Movies Online kelpie Tack and Equipment Classifieds 0 04-02-2007 11:03 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:03 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0