Bonding ideas for my new horse.
 
 

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Bonding ideas for my new horse.

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  • Bonding with a new horse
  • How to bond with my.new gelding

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    08-17-2013, 04:44 PM
  #1
Weanling
Bonding ideas for my new horse.

I am completely in love with my new Appaloosa gelding, but at the moment he only tolerates me. He really loves the barn owner, but she has been with him for 3 years. I want that bond with him. I try spending extra time brushing him out before and after a ride, and I reward him with peppermints for good behavior, but he still hasn't clicked with me yet. Sometimes he really tests me when I am on his back, but when I let the barn owner try (she is also my trainer) he behaves like an angel.

What are some bonding techniques I can try? Or will it just take time?
     
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    08-17-2013, 04:56 PM
  #2
Started
New horses will always test you. My horse used to test me for the first six months I rode him as my main horse - every now and then he still does but usually he behaves very nicely for me.
Your horse needs to have someone he can trust and look forward to being with. You both need to give each other respect - in or out of the pasture.
Any horse will love anyone who brushes him and gives him treats - treats don't work, they will eventually spoil a horse sometimes and become treaty ;)

It does take time, as well as small techniques. But mostly it just takes time - how much time? It could be from a week to maybe even three years. You won't always bond with every horse you have - every horse is different.

Always respect your horse, ask him to walk up to him in his pasture, let him walk to you when you are trying to catch him.
Make all the exercises fun and have tons of variety in warm ups and riding.
Horse's will get bored with the same thing over and over again.
Don't do the same thing the same way each tie you go out.
If you bring him out, let him eat, then brush him then work him then saddle up and ride - then the next day brush him let him eat, saddle up, warm ups, ride, let him eat.
When riding always have obstacles around and make sure you can change it up each time you ride.

At my place there are barrels and logs, so every day I move the barrels and logs into a new position - after I have ridden him through the way they were set up before. When I do move them, I let my horse walk freely as he pleases - and every time my horse, Brisco, follows me and sniffs everything I touch and move.... I have no idea why.

But make your horse WANT to be with you, not HAVE to be with you.
Bring him out o his pasture and put in the the round pen or arena and let him free. Then as you get the saddle and brushed out, let him free. When you are ready to brush him, catch him with respect from both you and your horse and let him eat while you brush him or something.

When I tie my horse to brush him, I always put him at least six feet away from the tack box and saddle. I always walk away from him, grab a brush, brush him, walk away and grab a new one, brush him, etc.
A few days ago, each time I came back with a new brush Brisco let out a little low huh-huh-huh- nicker, it was so funny and cute!!

But it takes time, patience, respect, love, and time. (yes, I did mean to write time twice ;) )
     
    08-17-2013, 05:42 PM
  #3
Trained
Yes, time. Horses like/are comfortable with what they know/are used to.
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    08-17-2013, 05:49 PM
  #4
Banned
Time and patience

Brush him, play games, take him for in hand walks, or just spend time sitting in a field with him. It wont happen over night, but if you gain each others trust, it will happen.
     
    08-18-2013, 03:33 AM
  #5
Green Broke
Worry less about bonding and trusting and more about you being the leader.

Horses do not bond with the lead horse in herd. They do not operate under bonding principles.

Horse does not like trainer more, it is because that person is the leader, and horse knows it. Horse knows what the rules are, so to speak with them.

Your voice may also be too high pitched, your motions be too jerky, or you may be aggravating horse in other ways.
     
    08-18-2013, 05:33 PM
  #6
Foal
I may be in a similar situation to you with a "new horse", but you say he loves the barn owner as she's had him 3 yrs?? He will naturally think nothing has changed really, its all on the same ground, the one way for you to bond well is to get out and do things together without the barn owner always in the background, his your horse, go places without her, with just you too and revel the time you spend.
     
    08-18-2013, 06:06 PM
  #7
Green Broke
I think it takes close to a year to really get a "bond" with a horse. That's a year of consistent time and work.

Some things I do are basic groundwork, getting my horse more responsive to my commands, hand-walking (usually combing with a little yielding, backing and grazing).

Another thing to consider, is your barn owner the one who feeds your horse, catches him, puts him out, rugs and unrugs? To me those are all things that help build a relationship. My horse expects me to come out every morning and night. This routine is part of her life. Perhaps you can build a similar routine.
     
    08-18-2013, 06:07 PM
  #8
Started
Take him for a long walk or hike. Literally be his leader. Lead him along for several miles if you're up to it, or as long as you can comfortably do. Horses follow those that are fair, consistent and show that they can and will protect the herd and squash any nonsense. Appies are generally smarter than some other horses and you have to demonstrate all of the above before that they will believe you are worth following. A long walk where he is literally following you gives you a chance to show him that you will hold up your end of the bargain.
     
    08-18-2013, 06:10 PM
  #9
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saskia    
I think it takes close to a year to really get a "bond" with a horse. That's a year of consistent time and work.

Some things I do are basic groundwork, getting my horse more responsive to my commands, hand-walking (usually combing with a little yielding, backing and grazing).

Another thing to consider, is your barn owner the one who feeds your horse, catches him, puts him out, rugs and unrugs? To me those are all things that help build a relationship. My horse expects me to come out every morning and night. This routine is part of her life. Perhaps you can build a similar routine.
Yeah, she does most stuff. Although I have started catching him on my own and his night feedings, I turn him out after lessons usually too (about 3 days a week). I am doing as much as I can to bond, but I know it needs more time.
     
    08-18-2013, 06:11 PM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharpie    
Take him for a long walk or hike. Literally be his leader. Lead him along for several miles if you're up to it, or as long as you can comfortably do. Horses follow those that are fair, consistent and show that they can and will protect the herd and squash any nonsense. Appies are generally smarter than some other horses and you have to demonstrate all of the above before that they will believe you are worth following. A long walk where he is literally following you gives you a chance to show him that you will hold up your end of the bargain.
This is a great idea! Thanks!
     

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