Breaking a Stallion
   

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Breaking a Stallion

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  • How to break in a stallion horse
  • How to break in stallion

 
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    02-26-2008, 01:40 PM
  #1
Yearling
Breaking a Stallion

Is it actually possible to break a stallion that hasn't been clipped yet? I
mean, I know of some people that has a stallion pony that rides smoothly,
but you get him around mares and he goes nuts!

Reason why I ask is because I'm getting a 2 yr. Old stallion
horse and was wanting to break him a.s.a.p.
     
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    02-26-2008, 02:11 PM
  #2
Banned
Re: Breaking a Stallion

Quote:
Originally Posted by Small_Town_Girl
Is it actually possible to break a stallion that hasn't been clipped yet? I
mean, I know of some people that has a stallion pony that rides smoothly,
but you get him around mares and he goes nuts!

Reason why I ask is because I'm getting a 2 yr. Old stallion
horse and was wanting to break him a.s.a.p.
anything is possible, but with a Stallion it may take more time and effort than it would with a mare or gelding. Yes the stallion will probably always go crazy then he sees a mare...especially if they are in heat.
     
    02-26-2008, 03:32 PM
  #3
Trained
Yes stallions can be broke to ride or to do whatever you want them to do. But because they are still intact, it takes an experienced person to handle/train them. You have to always keep them in check and not let them get away with anything. Also, being the owner of a stallion you are responsible for everything about him. You have to make sure where he is kept, he cannot get out and reproduce with a mare in heat. I would say if you have no plan on breeding him later on, to get him gelded. There are tons of unwanted grade horses out there that we don't need more.

If you don't mind me asking, what makes you want to get a stallion?
     
    02-26-2008, 05:30 PM
  #4
Foal
Yes it is I work with one sometimes at the place I take lessons.
     
    02-26-2008, 05:57 PM
  #5
tim
Weanling
Oh yea, some of the nicest show horses are also some of the nicest stallions you will ever meet.

I had a border collie dog that was never fixed, and he was nicer and calmer than most fixed dogs I've seen.

Course, most of them aren't like that, so you really need to know what you're doing.
     
    02-26-2008, 08:54 PM
  #6
Green Broke
Some of the 2 y/o stallions are calmer then some of the mares at our stable.....especially when they are edgy when they are in heat.....

The big thing is to look out for mares.... it's your biggest threat, because boys will be boys..... like they said earlier you will be responsible for your stallion and what he does..... also in case he does get to one of the mares there's the chance he could get kicked..... especially the younger stallions
     
    02-26-2008, 10:45 PM
  #7
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by appylover
being the owner of a stallion you are responsible for everything about him. You have to make sure where he is kept, he cannot get out and reproduce with a mare in heat. I would say if you have no plan on breeding him later on, to get him gelded

AMEN.

Is this stallion going to better the breed? If not, geld him. There are way too many stallions out there. Unless he is has EXCELLENT conformation and manners, and you're planning to show him and market him in the way stallions should, GELD HIM. I'm sorry if you think I'm being harsh, but ugly, good-for nothing stallions (and their irresponsable owners!) are why so many horses are getting slaughtered everyday.

Answer the above carefully and honestly...

I'm very very very passionate about this.
     
    02-27-2008, 08:57 AM
  #8
Green Broke
Ohyah
     
    02-27-2008, 10:03 AM
  #9
Weanling
Totally possible. But unless you're really experienced I wouldn't consider buying ANY horse this young.

I echo what everyone else said about gelding etc.
     
    02-27-2008, 05:28 PM
  #10
Yearling
Well, the reason I asked this question is because
My new horse is a beautiful Stallion, and I got
Him at a good price.

But just to let everyone know, I decided
To defiantely get him gelded.
     

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