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Buying a horse and feeling a little bit discouraged by turn of events.

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  • Clumsy yearling
  • Are yearling colts clumsy

 
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    07-01-2011, 02:26 AM
  #21
Weanling
So. I met that red dun yearling gelding I mentioned above. I spent about an hour with him, just messing around and playing with him. What a sweet little guy. He spent the good majority of the time ambling around, grazing, showing off and coming around for scratches. He stood, halterless, while I ran my hands all over his head, ears, body and legs, and picked up each foot obediently when I asked. I got the opportunity to see him at a free jog and my goodness... he floats! For a yearling, I was expecting a lot more 'awkward' packed into him, but he's surprisingly good looking. He still needs to grow into his legs a bit, but otherwise, he's very well put together.

Pros: He comes when called and stands quietly to be haltered. He picks up feet and stands quietly while you mess with them. He doesn't lean on you like some horses. He doesn't nip. His gaits are good and his feet look solid. He also treated me to a spook tonight - a blade of grass moved in the wind, he suddenly stopped trotting, raised his head, snorted and very carefully (as only a clumsy yearling can) snuck up on it and sniffed it. Some spook.

Cons: He's in the pushy colt stage. He's not horribly pushy, but he does have some issues respecting boundaries and personal space. The majority of that is probably due to the fact he's been left primarily alone in the paddock with his senior buddy. He's also still learning to stand while tied - he pulls back a bit. That needs some work. Both are very minor issues and should improve with patience and consistent contact.

I really enjoyed this colt and although he's going to get about 1-2hh taller than I was looking for, I think he might be worth a second look. The seller is more concerned with finding him a good home above all else and she saw that I enjoyed him. Before we parted ways, she asked if I'd like a few days to think about him and if so, she would hold him for me until Monday without a deposit (I'd mentioned my problem with the last horse). I left $100 with her anyway and we're going to meet up again on Monday so I can see him again after taking the weekend to think. If I choose not to buy him, she said she's return the deposit. She's going out of town this weekend and won't be showing him to other buyers anyway, so she's not afraid of losing a potential sale while I think about him. That was reassuring.

Is it normal to feel a mix of excitement, uncertainty and self doubt when purchasing a horse for the first time? I'm excited because I've wanted a horse for so long and I miss being around them. I'm uncertain because it's a huge purchase and a big chunk of my time to devote to an animal. I'm a little doubtful of myself, too. I know I can handle this horse, but I'm scared that I could screw him up. He's my first horse and although I have a lot of horse-savvy friends and a trainer to help me... I'm still a little scared. Is this a normal part of the horse buying process?
     
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    07-01-2011, 03:26 AM
  #22
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Courtney    
Is it normal to feel a mix of excitement, uncertainty and self doubt when purchasing a horse for the first time? I'm excited because I've wanted a horse for so long and I miss being around them. I'm uncertain because it's a huge purchase and a big chunk of my time to devote to an animal. I'm a little doubtful of myself, too. I know I can handle this horse, but I'm scared that I could screw him up. He's my first horse and although I have a lot of horse-savvy friends and a trainer to help me... I'm still a little scared. Is this a normal part of the horse buying process?
That is exactly how I felt when I bought my first horse back in Feb. So, I would consider it a normal feeling. It is a huge responsibility you are undertaking, but it sounds to me like you are ready for it. Good luck with this boy, maybe he will be the one for you.
     
    07-01-2011, 03:55 AM
  #23
Weanling
I'm really hoping one feeling begins to outshine the others. I really try to listen to my gut instinct on things like this, but it's hard when every single feeling is coming in waves, at an equal rate. I'm hoping a good night's sleep will clear my head a bit and give my body a chance to figure out which feeling is most pressing. I'm already shopping for horse supplies and mentally renaming the horse, so maybe that's a sign...?
     
    07-01-2011, 10:55 AM
  #24
Foal
I don't want to be the one to rain on the parade here but you are looking at buying a yearling? As your first horse purchase? That seems a bit out in left field to me. He has to grow for at least another year before you can even start breaking him and then it will still be a while after that before you can actually ride him. It just doesnt add up, I have been riding / buying / selling horses my whole life and I still would not buy a yearling. Sure it could be a great investment and if I had other horses that I could ride and do things with on a higher level maybe if the price was right. But to be your first purchase and your only horse, I must admit I have to question it. I don't want to be rude nor come off as I am attacking you it just doesnt make sense. You went from a 3 yr old to another horse and now a yearling. Are you not planning on riding for the next couple years? Even if you plan on riding after he has grown and developed his knee caps will not close until he is 5 or so, so if you want to do any type of jumping / competing in rodeo events it will be even longer after that so you do not break him down at an early age. Again sorry to be the grumpy ol' cat lady but it just doesnt add up.
     
    07-01-2011, 02:18 PM
  #25
Weanling
Hey there. No, it's definitely a valid question. I've actually been looking at a variety of horses within all age ranges, trying to find a horse that fits the temperament rather than age. As for riding, I'm not actually too big on riding. I'm looking more for a horse that I can love on, spend time with and eventually hop up on to take around the trails. I've always more enjoyed the bond I get with a horse, just from grooming and loving it.

If I adopt this yearling, I have no plans to ride him until at least late next year, bareback, at a walk and maybe a trot. The year after that, we might work up to a little bit more work but when all is said and done, he would be a glorified pasture pet and trail horse. The extent of his jumping would be a low log on the trail. I don't have a desire to show, nor am I a devoted rider. This year, all I want to do with him are work on ground manners, take him for walks (in hand) and do some round penning. Nothing too strenuous.

Even with the older horses I've been looking at, I wasn't thinking of getting on until next year at some point. I want that bond, first and foremost, before I even think of riding. That's why I'm looking more at the horse rescues. I don't need a fancy horse - I just need a calm, willing horse that is decently conformed.
     

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