Buying My First Horse - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Talk

Buying My First Horse

This is a discussion on Buying My First Horse within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Buying my first horse

Like Tree1Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    05-28-2011, 03:18 AM
  #11
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by HorseinJ    
Well you said it your yourself never count out an older horse. Like it's an underdog, not all horses are the same and many of the older ones has lots of wear on them. Vet bills and all. Start out with a young horse and maybe teach the horse yourself for a first timer that's how you get good IMO. Not pay someone to teach you, that is blowing money when you can use it to spend on feed.

The first time horse owner is rarely capable of teaching a young horse how to be a good horse. They need experience to be able to do this well, and having an older, more stable horse for the first one is much better way to be ready to train one the next time around.

The OP has some confidence issues and she will be much happier on a middle aged horse than a 5 year old. Really!
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    05-28-2011, 01:37 PM
  #12
Weanling
I think 15 is a great age, but like others have said it can also depend on the breed and just the general condition of the horse.

I have been mulling over the stereotype of 'older' horses, and really, I have never met a horse under 18 who couldn't pull their own weight (unless they had other health issues).

You can also buy a spectacular horse who is 'older' as compared to a mediocre horse who is 'younger' for the same amount of money.
     
    05-28-2011, 02:19 PM
  #13
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by HorseinJ    
Well you said it your yourself never count out an older horse. Like it's an underdog, not all horses are the same and many of the older ones has lots of wear on them. Vet bills and all. Start out with a young horse and maybe teach the horse yourself for a first timer that's how you get good IMO. Not pay someone to teach you, that is blowing money when you can use it to spend on feed.
Until you wreck the horse out of inexperience and have to pay someone to fix your mistake. Or pass it on to someone else as a troubled horse, saying it wasn't you but the horse, and start the cycle again.
Would you ever teach yourself to fly an airplane? Why risk your animal's wellbeing for the sake of the ego and a few dollars?
Horseback riding isn't easy to begin with - and training horses is a whole other ballgame.
Regarding age - please do more research. Show jumpers are considered "young" at 8-10 years old, and hit thier prime in their teens.
Please don't perpetuate such misinformation.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    05-28-2011, 02:51 PM
  #14
Weanling
Well I ended up finding Dancer and he's about 15. Dancer knows a lot but also tests me a lot so I still have to work on training. I think he's the perfect age for me and well suited for me.
     
    05-28-2011, 04:25 PM
  #15
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
Regarding age - please do more research. Show jumpers are considered "young" at 8-10 years old, and hit thier prime in their teens.
Please don't perpetuate such misinformation.
Posted via Mobile Device
Exactly. Our lead mare (now 17, go anywhere, do anything, penner) is still in her prime and hasn't lost a step over how she was 10 years ago, You can't beat her experience and consistency or her value as a teacher for the younger mares.
     
    05-30-2011, 04:20 PM
  #16
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by HorseinJ    
Well you said it your yourself never count out an older horse. Like it's an underdog, not all horses are the same and many of the older ones has lots of wear on them. Vet bills and all. Start out with a young horse and maybe teach the horse yourself for a first timer that's how you get good IMO. Not pay someone to teach you, that is blowing money when you can use it to spend on feed.
Sounds like the voice of inexperiance to me. Putting two "greenies" together is the best way to get someone hurt or worse. My first horse was purchased by me a completely green person with non horse parents who figured she knew everything about horses since she had read lots of books and watched videos. So after the first year of nearly starving my horse, near disasters with my horse or myself getting hurt (to this day I don't know how we didn't kill each other), and "saving money" by not getting a trainer... I got lucky. The experianced horse person down the road told me off, told me to feed my horse, and to figure out how to ride before someone got hurt. Hard on a 12yr old, but I took her advice and spent hours at her barn learning how to care for horses. Her 29yr old morgan gelding showed me the proper way to ride and I loved him for it. My horse loved him too as I became better at riding her also.
Sorry, but its only in the movies that the untrainable horse and the completely unknowledgable rider magically bond and ride off into the sunset.... the reality is that the horse becomes "uncontrollable" is sold off and becomes someone elses headache or ends up in the kill pen and the unknowledgeble rider either goes out to find a new horse to ruin or gives up horses altogether.

Stepping down from my soapbox now.

I'm not trying to rant at you HorseinJ. I'm sure it does seem ideal but I've seen too many accidents and sob stories from thinking such as this. I don't want to see you added to the list.
     
    05-30-2011, 04:40 PM
  #17
Weanling
There is a very good reason for the saying "green on green makes black and blue".
If a green rider has an experienced, well trained horse, they can learn how to ride and feel how maneuvers should be done. A good instructor is well worth the money. Like someone else said, you don't teach yourself to fly a plane or drive a car. Horses are large animals that are capable of causing serious injury.
If a rider doesn't have the knowledge or confidence to train a horse properly, you end up with a hard to fix and possibly dangerous horse and a frustrated owner.
I want to see more people involved with horses, I don't want to see them hurt and/or frustrated enough that they quit.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    05-31-2011, 12:50 AM
  #18
Foal
Paying somebody to teach you isnt wasting your money unless they tell you do something or use things you don't need too.
Like with 25yr old mare I had one coach tell me I needed a whip or spurs which if I had actually used either she would have never trusted me again. Because she was a rescue mare from the auction.
Never put a beginner on an inexperienced horse that's just asking for disaster.
     
    05-31-2011, 07:45 PM
  #19
Trained
I don't think you can get insurance for a horse after a certain age. It's somewhere around mid teens, but I'm not sure exactly what age.
     
    05-31-2011, 07:49 PM
  #20
Showing
Most insurance companies will insure from 3-16 years of age, thereabouts. 16 isn't old, either, but insurance companies are in it for the money, and horses bodies only last so long, so better they get out early while its still highly profitable rather than marginally so.
Posted via Mobile Device
     

Tags
begginer, purchasing

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What NOT to do when buying a horse Sghorselover Horse Riding 5 03-28-2010 01:46 AM
Buying My First Horse HorseRiderLover Horse Talk 50 10-10-2009 07:59 AM
Need Help buying Horse... tizzberrypie Horses for Sale 19 06-17-2008 12:05 AM
buying horse beckys21 Horses for Sale 11 05-24-2008 04:34 PM
buying 1st horse....? crazy4mydragon Horses for Sale 7 08-28-2007 09:25 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:10 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0