Concerned about my horse, looking for some input. - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
 2Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 24 Old 05-30-2013, 01:57 PM
Teen Forum Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: South East Texas
Posts: 7,157
• Horses: 2
If you think it is neurological, I would suggest getting a vet out to do some tests on him, including a blood panel to see if he's missing a vital mineral or vitamin. Sometimes it takes just a slight difference to cause a big change.

Everyone in your life is meant to
be in your journey, but not all of
them are meant to stay till the end.
Endiku is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 24 Old 05-30-2013, 02:04 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 1,438
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic Melly View Post
He cant be attached to the other horses as he has only been at this barn for 2 weeks... Posted via Mobile Device

heh heh. As someone who has a horse that moves frequently, and thus gets herdbound sometimes, a horse CAN and WILL get herdbound or buddy sour in a matter of days. Believe me, I have experienced this plenty of times. If your horse likes his stall buddy more he will definitely throw a fit if he is pastured with someone else.

I'm not sure what else it would be, honestly. I don't see a reason for a horse to act out like that, save for he's upset - calling out and pacing the fenceline says to me he is trying to get to someone or something not in his pasture. Can he see his stall buddy from his pasture at all?
Shoebox is offline  
post #13 of 24 Old 05-30-2013, 03:57 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 7
• Horses: 0
Thanks... Believe me, i have been going over it in my head for days... And honestly all i can come up with is that he just cant handle the changes in his life.. But what to do about it is whats causing me grief... None of it adds up, i have owned him since birth, when i say his behaviour has done a 180 i mean it... Hes turned out with his stall mate but doesnt seem to want anything to do with him... The other horse will be across the field grazing and mine just paces the fence line, calling... Who or what he is calling for baffles me, as he lived alone for the past 9 months... We are talking about a horse that for the past 11 years has been the most mellow laid back attitude you could ever dream for in a horse, and honestly its pretty upsetting to see this kind of behaviour. It just isnt adding up, He is clearly displaying signs of being stressed and rather then settling in over time, the behaviour is simply escalating, and i fear for his wellbeing, on a long term basis.
Posted via Mobile Device
Magic Melly is offline  
post #14 of 24 Old 05-30-2013, 04:02 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 1,438
• Horses: 2
He could indeed not know how to handle the changes - Clementine had a major crisis when I first moved her too. She did get over it, though, after a bit of time.

If he was all by himself for so long, he may just be longing for the herd. Sure he's got one friend, but he can see all the others down there, and he's lonely. Maybe two isn't enough herd for him, and he sees what he's been missing for so many months.

If you're that concerned about it get a vet out and get him checked out.
Shoebox is offline  
post #15 of 24 Old 05-30-2013, 04:31 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Cariboo, British Columbia
Posts: 11,509
• Horses: 3
Welcome to the forum, I am from BC too, 100 Mile House. Your horse sounds herd bound and couldn't handle the changes from a place he lived his entire life to moving around. He needs something else to keep his mind occupied. He needs regular work with other things to think about. Haul him to different places for rides, lessons, clinics. Ride him with different horses, set up a trail course and get his mind on other things. He has too much free brain space to wallow in his sense of loss for his buddy and his old security of old home, fill his brain with other exciting things. Good luck.
Posted via Mobile Device
waresbear is offline  
post #16 of 24 Old 05-30-2013, 04:32 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 2,694
• Horses: 2
He may very well have a mineral deficiency. Moving pastures= different soil content. A new feed, possibly new hay. He could have a magnesium deficiency, which can make a horse go nuts. It could definitely explain the sudden a attitude change.
Posted via Mobile Device
Kayella is offline  
post #17 of 24 Old 05-30-2013, 04:59 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 7
• Horses: 0
Thank you all for your thoughts, its appreciated.. Its just so unnerving and upsetting to see him so blatently unhappy, and not getting better over time... I suppose he has gone from a very low sensory environment to a much busier place with a lot going on... I just hope he adjusts soon... We dont have a vet readily available where we live so if on the next visit to my town my horse hasnt improved then i will get him vetted... Any one familiar with any kind of herbal remedy or something i could maybe give to calm him? i dont want to drug him or anything like that and im not at all familiar with herbal remedies for horses or if they even exist and or work but I hate seeing him a nervous wreck and if i can help make the changes on him easier then i would like to.. Plus i dont think the owner of the farm is appreciating him digging a trench in her nice field from his constant fence pacing and other boarders are bothered by his behaviour. Thanks again :)
Posted via Mobile Device
Magic Melly is offline  
post #18 of 24 Old 05-30-2013, 05:04 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: British Columbia
Posts: 2,431
• Horses: 1
I don't know if you mentioned it, but how long has he been at the new place?
alexischristina is offline  
post #19 of 24 Old 05-30-2013, 05:36 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Cariboo, British Columbia
Posts: 11,509
• Horses: 3
Try 1/4 cup of apple cider vinegar on his grain. I have seen this stuff work wonders before. Start out with a little bit and make sure the fumes dissipate before feeding it. Gradually increase it until he develops a taste for it, once they do, they love it. Worth a try and it's cheap, give it 2 weeks to work.
Posted via Mobile Device
waresbear is offline  
post #20 of 24 Old 05-30-2013, 06:38 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,927
• Horses: 0
I have found that many horses are not necessarily herd bound, but home bound. Some will try to escape by any means to get back to the place they called home previously. Some will run themselves ragged over a change.

Try to get him tired. Work him as much as possible. If there is someone you trust at the new place, maybe they could ride/work him, on days you cannot get there. Ride him away from the new place as often as possible, taking him obviously back to his new home. Have a few treats for him each time he comes home. Hopefully, he will look upon it as 'his' place soon.

There are some herbal remedies you can give to calm him down a bit. Do a google search.

And it could be that he's just happy to see others, after being along for so long.

Can't think of anything else. Sorry.

Lizzie
FeatheredFeet is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Concerned because my horse keeps bumping herself and me into the wall/rail englishaqh Horse Training 31 09-11-2012 03:35 PM
Concerned about my horse's eyesight... advice? englishaqh Horse Health 4 09-09-2012 08:41 PM
Concerned that my horse ran away with me and I was unable to stop him... ashraowens Horse Training 17 04-14-2012 01:14 PM
Horse people input cmright Horse Breeds 10 09-12-2010 10:32 PM
not my horse, but im concerned! morganshow11 Horse Health 15 02-15-2009 02:56 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome