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Convincing husband to buy horse

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        01-19-2013, 05:41 PM
      #11
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CowboysDream    
    See in my household I would get in trouble if I took that 1100$ and basically called dibs on it to put towards a horse. Because technically half of that would be his.
    I agree with this.

    Besides, if your extra money consists of $1100/month and your board is $850 plus $120 for lessons, that doesn't leave you with much extra for emergencies.

    You have to factor in the time it will take you away from your family. Perhaps your husband will become jealous if you become increasingly engrossed in your equestrian pursuits. Owning and leasing are two different situations, and owning is definitely more demanding of your time and attention.

    How much money does your husband spend on his hobbies? Do you have any hobbies that you share together? I realize this is your passion, but if it's going to cause friction in an otherwise happy marriage, it is NOT worth it.
         
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        01-19-2013, 06:07 PM
      #12
    Green Broke
    Setting up a realistic budget is important to getting a hesitant spouse on board

    If you don't know already, find out what it costs to maintain the horse you're currently half leasing (especially if buying her is an option). Consider the minimum level you'd be happy with (i.e. You'd be unhappy if you could keep the horse, but would be unable to take lessons or you couldn't afford the expensive joint injections a prospective horse needs to stay sound) and then also consider what you'd expect to spend over the course of a year if you do everything you want to (show fees, hauling, training, etc.)

    If "financial ruin" is your husband's biggest concern, be sure to include major medical insurance in your budget. There's very little aside from emergency vet visits that can't be planned and budgeted. But, if you know you only have to cover a $300 deductible should something happen it's much less frightening.
         
        01-20-2013, 01:13 PM
      #13
    Trained
    I don't mean this sarcasitically, so forgive if it sounds that way. If I had to board, and board would cost me $850 per horse - I would put in my proposal - "move".
    If I could not move, I would put in my proposal - how far do I have to drive to reduce that cost, and how much is the gas there and back. I mean, $850? I would also put in my proposal 2 horses at $1700, as compared to a mortgage on a house w horse property in "x place".
         
        01-20-2013, 01:56 PM
      #14
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Missy May    
    I don't mean this sarcasitically, so forgive if it sounds that way. If I had to board, and board would cost me $850 per horse - I would put in my proposal - "move".
    Yeah, $850 is my mortgage payment on a place that could support two or more horses. Though I keep mine at a friend's place, most of my neighbors have or have had anywhere from two to five.

    Also agree about the emergency vet bills. As the owner of a "free to good home" horse that ran up bills somewhere north of $5K, I know from experience this is a real possibility.
         
        01-20-2013, 02:26 PM
      #15
    Weanling
    I think it's important to realize that you CAN keep things cheap, if you try. There will always need to be an "emergency" fund, but you can supplement this by keeping costs down in the meantime.

    This may sound silly, but when looking to buy your horse, look for an "easy keeper" with good feet. Sucks to limit your buying possibilities, but you WILL save money. For example, I live in a northern climate and my horse is outside 24/7. She is a fat, healthy, 13 year old mare. She goes barefoot year round because she has excellent feet, and is on zero supplements (not even grain, except when I'm working her hard every day). She does just fine on free-choice hay.

    I realize that this is not a possibility for many horses, but I also feel that sometimes people tend to pour money into horses for reasons that are not really essential.

    24/7 turnout is cheaper, as well as healthier for the horse.

    I've been riding for my entire life, and most of my tack has been second hand. I have a very hard time justifying buying new when they are so many great advertising websites to buy from (kijiji, ebay, craigslist), and lots of second hand tack shops around.

    Show fees will depend - here, I think dressage classes are about $10 each.

    I can't comment on shots because we don't do vaccinations here (located very far north with small horse population). You will need at least a once-yearly coggins test though. Those are quite cheap I believe (expensive here though). We worm our horses ourselves 2x/year for around $10 each time. I've heard you can give some vaccinations yourself, and purchase them online for much cheaper than getting the vet to do it.

    And definitely just learn to pull manes/clip yourself, it's really not very hard :)
         
        01-20-2013, 03:05 PM
      #16
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Missy May    
    I don't mean this sarcasitically, so forgive if it sounds that way. If I had to board, and board would cost me $850 per horse - I would put in my proposal - "move".
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SnowCowgirl
    I think it's important to realize that you CAN keep things cheap, if you try. There will always need to be an "emergency" fund, but you can supplement this by keeping costs down in the meantime.

    This may sound silly, but when looking to buy your horse, look for an "easy keeper" with good feet. Sucks to limit your buying possibilities, but you WILL save money. For example, I live in a northern climate and my horse is outside 24/7. She is a fat, healthy, 13 year old mare. She goes barefoot year round because she has excellent feet, and is on zero supplements (not even grain, except when I'm working her hard every day). She does just fine on free-choice hay.

    I realize that this is not a possibility for many horses, but I also feel that sometimes people tend to pour money into horses for reasons that are not really essential.

    24/7 turnout is cheaper, as well as healthier for the horse.
    I agree with both of these. Our mares are at home with us and are all 'low maintenance', barefoot and grass/hay diet. Looking at our yearly expenses including hay, feed, vet, supplies, barn/fence maintenance, etc., the average we spend is only about $2/day/horse. Much cheaper than children.
         

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