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Coyotes and horses

This is a discussion on Coyotes and horses within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        11-26-2012, 02:00 PM
      #11
    Green Broke
    ^^^what "themacpack" said.

    There is nothing worse than domestic-dogs-gone-wild packing up against livestock. Especially when the dogs have been dumped and need food.

    I am in my 60's and can remember, as a child, all the farmers gathering on a Saturday to go wild dog hunting, if there had been a rash of cow and/or calf killings.

    Dogs WILL bring down a 2,000 lb cow in heartbeat. The cow cannot outrun them and once those dogs get a taste for blood and the sport of killing (along with fresh red meat) there's nothing left to do but hunt the dogs down and send them onto their ancestors. A bullet in the head by a sharpshooter farmer is much less painful than getting hit by a car in the middle of the night.
         
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        11-26-2012, 02:00 PM
      #12
    Started
    Lone Coyotes and small packs, only take small rodents, chickens or pets, which they can easily kill. Larger packs will attack Mini Horses and Mini Donkeys. When they make a kill, they will set up a very loud yapping and howling. And Coyotes don't just live in country areas. I saw a surprising TV show, showing what an enormous problem Coyotes are, in Chicago. There are patrols each night, trying to find and trap them. Coyotes usually hunt at night, so are not easily seen in the daytime.

    We hear them nightly in most areas of S. California. This especially in our desert and mountain areas.

    Lizzie
         
        11-26-2012, 02:09 PM
      #13
    Trained
    My inlaws in S.Ca. Had a coyote problem in their neighborhood. Small dogs been killed.

    As for the singing, I try to learn how many I hear and what they're saying. We have a loner who is calling for about an hour at a crack, I actually feel sorry for him. Must be a youngster, his voice changed over time.
    FlyGap likes this.
         
        11-26-2012, 02:12 PM
      #14
    Showing
    They'll take cats too, which is where I'm sure most of my missing barn cats have gone. The coyotes can't get in the barn, so if the cats are determined to roam they're in danger of being a meal.
    themacpack likes this.
         
        11-26-2012, 02:16 PM
      #15
    Trained
    Yup, highly possible. When I got my cats from the shelter, Floppy was considered a stray when he was caught. First night with us, coyotes were singing and set him off growling and hiding. Princess, indoor cat, dropped off at the shelter by her owner, wasn't concerned at all. Seems like Floppy had coyote encounters.
         
        11-26-2012, 02:25 PM
      #16
    Trained
    Grrrrrrr, hunting dogs.
    We have several a year show up starved and half mad. They get lost, they weren't fed before the hunt (not saying all dogs are treated the same), they aren't scared of humans, and they've been fed raw horse meat... I can't think of a worse predator.
         
        11-26-2012, 02:27 PM
      #17
    Showing
    Most of the half starved hunting dogs I get around here are sniveling, scrawny creatures. I feel badly for them, but I have an aged Great Dane as well as barn cats, and can't afford to vet and feed every skinny mongrel that shows up.
         
        11-26-2012, 02:49 PM
      #18
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
    Most of the half starved hunting dogs I get around here are sniveling, scrawny creatures. I feel badly for them, but I have an aged Great Dane as well as barn cats, and can't afford to vet and feed every skinny mongrel that shows up.
    Isn't that the awful truth. Both my dogs are rescues as are all six cats and one of my horses.

    We can't take them all in or we become that person we are trying to save them from.

    Have you ever watched any of the animal hoarding rescues?

    I watched one on our local news; it as so gut-wrenching watching those starving animals and the lady crying her heart out that I could never watch another one. The lady meant well but things got out of control and she didn't have enough money to keep them in control
         
        11-26-2012, 02:56 PM
      #19
    Showing
    Yep, we've had some major seizures around here. One place, they took out over 100 dogs in one doublewide!

    Those poor animals were in awful shape, and many had to be euthed.

    The owner claimed to be devastated, but was pretty obviously mentally ill. There's no way a sane person would allow themselves to get into that type of situation and think it was okay.

    Her health was compromised as well, having lived in the same filth as the animals.
         
        11-26-2012, 10:12 PM
      #20
    Foal
    They are pretty skittish, I have never worried about the horses. They have killed plenty of chickens/geese/and lambs on our farm though. They never took down a full grown sheep so I highly doubt they would do much to a horse. There are a ton around our farm.
         

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