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Differences in horse culture - US/AUS

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  • English vs western equestrian culture

 
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    06-03-2009, 11:58 PM
  #11
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by wild_spot    


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Really??? That boggles my mind, lol.

I do get that there are different situations in different parts of countries, different states, rural vs. city etc. It seems though that the majority of Americans on here either keep their horse at their own property, or in a barn. The way it's talked about on here makes it seem very foreign to what we have here.
BB=Bulletin Board=Forum

Very few of us have horses. They are luxuries. I don't see a ton of difference between boarding a horse and the way you keep your horses.

And yup, I have never, ever seen an English saddle in real life. Heck, you don't see English riding or dressage, etc., here. Horses were for work around the farm here. Now, horses are a luxury but we still use the same Western gear.

     
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    06-04-2009, 12:05 AM
  #12
Trained
Ah ok. True, most members here are recreational riders and not ranch workers/etc, so it is a bti of a one sided representation. Can only go off what I have though, lol. I guess you could apply my observations to the recreational horse riding community.

Really? Where I am is a bit different than most, my dad manages a property so we get free agistment and a shed to use, plus 3 properties worth of trails and cattle and sheep to chase.

But the general agistment cost for a group paddock around here is $20 a week, from what I hear it is a lot more expensive to board over there, sometimes up to $800+... Plus, in these places you get hardly any facilities, and no place to keep gear or feed...
     
    06-04-2009, 12:17 AM
  #13
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by wild_spot    
But the general agistment cost for a group paddock around here is $20 a week, from what I hear it is a lot more expensive to board over there, sometimes up to $800+... Plus, in these places you get hardly any facilities, and no place to keep gear or feed...
ya $20 a week is pretty cheap over there. I pay around $120 a month which includes a tack room and a place to keep my feed. Wash racks, a paddock with a run in shelter. Also free access to an arena, round pen, track and a huge field and ponds to run around in. And that's considered pretty cheap here.
     
    06-04-2009, 12:21 AM
  #14
Cat
Green Broke
I don't think you can clump all of the US together in the little you have read online. This is such a diverse country that things are done differently from one person to another. Some may do things very similar to what you are used too.

No, we have nothing that is government owned. Our government was set up to stay out of things like that. However, most people I know don't keep their horses stalled. Mine are out in pasture 24/7 as well. I do have stalls - but I use 3 of them for hay storage and the 4th is kept open for if we need the vet to come or something.

As to rugging/blanketing - I don't work my horses hard enough to clip them, honestly. However, the people I know that show their horses or actually work their horses will clip and blanket them. It all depends on the type and amount of riding you do.

As to the reining - my haflinger can neck-rein in a snaffle or halter. My tack is so miss-matched at times its not even funny. I use whatever is comfortable and I have on hand at the time. I'm happy, the horse is happy - it works.
     
    06-04-2009, 12:39 AM
  #15
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by wild_spot    
Ah ok. True, most members here are recreational riders and not ranch workers/etc, so it is a bti of a one sided representation. Can only go off what I have though, lol. I guess you could apply my observations to the recreational horse riding community.

Really? Where I am is a bit different than most, my dad manages a property so we get free agistment and a shed to use, plus 3 properties worth of trails and cattle and sheep to chase.

But the general agistment cost for a group paddock around here is $20 a week, from what I hear it is a lot more expensive to board over there, sometimes up to $800+... Plus, in these places you get hardly any facilities, and no place to keep gear or feed...
Depending on the facilities, you pay $220-$300/month for full board around here. I cannot imagine boarding being $800/month. That must be in big cities/big, fancy barns.

You also have to realize that salaries and costs vary widely by region. Here, the cost of the average house is not much over $100,000. There are places where you couldn't purchase an apartment for that. The US is a huge country and costs/ideas vary widely.
     
    06-04-2009, 12:48 AM
  #16
Trained
I do agree, and it's the same here. I can only speak with experience of horse ownership in canberra, but know many people who keep horses in rural areas and other cities. I'm not trying to generalise the whole of the US, i'm simply commenting on some differences I have found between the culture I know here, and the culture I am hearing about there. In no way do I think that my views above are an accurate representation of the whole of the US.

Where I live, you couldn't purchase an apartment for that. I'm sure in very rural/remote places you MAY be able to find a house that cheap. We have a similar variety in salaries, lifestyle etc. that you do.
     
    06-04-2009, 01:11 AM
  #17
Yearling
Really interesting to read about the differences / similarities between the US and AUS . As I live in Europe I know very little of the horse culture of either.
     
    06-04-2009, 01:28 AM
  #18
Trained
And I would venture to say that there would be even more differences between us and the European horse culture.
     
    06-04-2009, 01:32 AM
  #19
Yearling
Just to give you an idea about europe - I live in Hungary ( the whole country has a population which is smaller than that of NY city ) , and there are three completley seperate horse cultures with very little or no crossover between them.
     
    06-04-2009, 02:06 AM
  #20
Chat Moderator
This had been a good read, funny I do several things similar to you Wild_Spot, my horse is out side 24/7, and I have never had a professional lesson. Just an older friend helping me out.

Personally I have concidered the Aussie saddle a third type of saddle and either English or western saddle. The plantation and the Spanish also don't fit into those two classes of saddle in my mind. The main reason at least for me that trail riders mainly use western saddle is they are more versatile and security of that saddle vs the English saddle

The divide between the two is because of the image, to many American (mostly guys who ride western) western tack = cowboys and ruggedness and in their minds. While English = rich spoiled punkes, and show ponies who can't do anything out side of the show ring, ie polo players. I am not saying everyone feels that way that is just the image I think they have in American horse culture.
     

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