Do horses NEED to be pastured??? - Page 5
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Talk

Do horses NEED to be pastured???

This is a discussion on Do horses NEED to be pastured??? within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • What do you need to set up a pasture for horses
  • Do horses need a pasture

Like Tree95Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    08-22-2013, 02:41 AM
  #41
Weanling
This horse actually has great hooves, which is important to me in a horse. She is only shod for trail riding but she doesn't have to be shod in the winter because she's only ridden in the arena which has a really great substrate, which is the same substrate used at our local rodeo grounds.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    08-22-2013, 05:26 AM
  #42
Started
This has been an interesting debate. What I find rather amusing, though, is comparing our horses to wild ones. I mean, really? When was the last time you saw a wild horse strolling around the barn yard with a predator on his back?! We have been breeding horses to live with humans for many, many years.

Of course, some really strong instincts are still within them. We have definitely changed them, though. Even if you give your horse plenty of pasture, you usually still need to trim their feet. Wild horses don't stand around in lush green grass 24/7. They run into rocky hard situations. There are times they do without. Most people, even those with lots of pasture cannot recreate a horse in the wild situation. We don't have to. We have been breeding them to adapt to living with humans.

The most important thing is that you provide your horse with plenty of fresh water, shelter in bad weather, food...and that is whatever keeps your horse healthy and something to graze on....which can be hay or grass, exercise, hoof and vet care when necessary. I do think a buddy of some kind is important, too. That is a heck of a lot more than a horse in the wild is guaranteed.

My horses are well taken care of and happy. There is never a winter where they don't have. That is more than you can say for a wild horse. Heck, I have a horse that is 29 years old. She has only been retired a few months. She would have not made it to near this age in the wild.
AlexS, Hidalgo13, jaydee and 1 others like this.
     
    08-22-2013, 11:28 AM
  #43
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsms    
I don't know of ANY non-pasture living horses who have related behavioral problems or health problems if they are fed properly and ridden regularly.

The world is a big place. If you haven't seen stalled performance horses with stereotypies, then you know not of what you speak.
AlexS likes this.
     
    08-22-2013, 11:54 AM
  #44
Started
I also have to laugh at the wild horse argument. Wild horses DIE in the wild. Not all of them, but many, they're killed by predators, they starve in the winter and they freeze to death in the winter and dehydrate in the summer.
Modern horses are bred down - they aren't all hardy little wild horses.
At our rescue we have a Cushing's Shetland pony who's pretty badly foundered. You'd kill her to put her on pasture - in fact, come spring we have to put her in our small dry lot paddocks. Our minis would explode if we let them out to pasture! Our TB's would freeze to death in the winter without their blankets and stalls to protect them from the wind and snow. Our wooly ponies would seriously overheat in the summer if we didn't clip them. What about our old less-than-sound horses? Having to walk great distances to reach their food and water could be really disastrous. We have an older Arabian with a ruptured tendon, it has healed but is very delicate - if we turned her out in a pasture to run and play she'd ruin herself.
Not all horses can just be turned out and actually make it.

I don't think anyone on here is suggesting any horse should be locked in a stall and left there 24/7 except for to be ridden an hour a day. The question is, should they have a massive turn out with grass available 24/7 or are substitutes alright.
I work at a farm that is over the line for me, their horses are stalled (in stalls too small), and either ridden or turned out in small paddocks alone for only 1 hour a day. They only have 3 paddocks for 30+ horses, so they need to be rotated all day. This situation does cause issues and many stable vices and some seriously pent up horses.
But I don't think anyone here is saying that type of situation is ok. I think most people are just saying it's ok for them to have a stall to retreat to when the weather is something their body can't handle. I think most people are saying, so long as they have adequate turn out space and time, and a lack of grass is substituted with good quality hay, some good buddies with them or over a fence where they can play, and some good quality exercise. That's just fine. Our job is to provide what our horses need - and pasture isn't always what they need - in fact often it can be dangerous.

Blanket Statements Don't Work.
AlexS, Hidalgo13 and jaydee like this.
     
    08-22-2013, 12:40 PM
  #45
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sahara    
The world is a big place. If you haven't seen stalled performance horses with stereotypies, then you know not of what you speak.
Yes, I'm sure I could find stalled horses with problems. I'm sure I could find pastured horses with problems. It isn't the corral or pasture causing the problem, but neglect and not caring.

My horses have good feet - but their corral is dry, very firm, even rocky in places. If I let the poop build up 12" deep or put my corral in a marsh (not likely around here), then their feet would suck. And I've seen 'pastures' that were more swamp than pasture...

I've seen too long hooves in horses in corrals and pastures. Neither setting makes the hooves bad, but a lack of trimming.

Maybe I am lucky. Around where I live, within a few miles, all of the horses I've seen live in corrals. They also have good feet, are not fat, have muscles and are showing no easily visible signs of problems. None of the people I associate with are having any health problems caused by corrals. One has allergies, and one apparently was purchased with a so-so leg. That is it. I've had 5 horses living on my property for at least 6 months. One was a 2 year old that was basically given to us, and I gave her to a trainer who now uses her for lessons. Another was sold to a couple who live about 1.5 miles from here. She is still living in a corral. According to the farrier we share, Lilly is doing great. And the vet and the farrier say my horses are all healthy...so it seems this completely inexperienced owner has been 5 for 5 in keeping healthy horses in a corral.

Since none of the horses I know living in corrals have problems, I conclude that living in a corral does not cause problems. From what I've seen, stupid and neglectful owners cause problems, and will do so regardless of pasture, corral or stall.
jaydee and PunksTank like this.
     
    08-22-2013, 12:50 PM
  #46
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by PunksTank    
Blanket Statements Don't Work.
This!

I've been around numerous stalled performance horses - worked with a few big name breeders/trainers throughout the years - and never encountered any stall vices. The only cribbing collar I've ever applied was to an old broodmare who was 100% pastured. Proper management is the key.
jaydee likes this.
     
    08-22-2013, 01:18 PM
  #47
Green Broke
IMO the situation OP described sounds like it is/will be fine.

I'll also reiterate what others have said about getting the work arrangement in writing. Make sure it covers how many days per week, how many stalls, etc. you're responsible for, and what happens if you get sick or want to go somewhere on vacation and you can't be there to do the stalls on your day (do you pay a pro-rated fee for the days you don't clean? If so, how much?) and what kind of notice you'd have to give if you wanted to move your horse or just pay cash instead of working.

You can find lots of threads on this and other sites about arrangements like this going very badly; it's always best to have something in writing in case it does!
jaydee and PunksTank like this.
     
    08-22-2013, 11:53 PM
  #48
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsms    
Yes, I'm sure I could find stalled horses with problems. I'm sure I could find pastured horses with problems. It isn't the corral or pasture causing the problem, but neglect and not caring.

My horses have good feet - but their corral is dry, very firm, even rocky in places. If I let the poop build up 12" deep or put my corral in a marsh (not likely around here), then their feet would suck. And I've seen 'pastures' that were more swamp than pasture...

I've seen too long hooves in horses in corrals and pastures. Neither setting makes the hooves bad, but a lack of trimming.

Maybe I am lucky. Around where I live, within a few miles, all of the horses I've seen live in corrals. They also have good feet, are not fat, have muscles and are showing no easily visible signs of problems. None of the people I associate with are having any health problems caused by corrals. One has allergies, and one apparently was purchased with a so-so leg. That is it. I've had 5 horses living on my property for at least 6 months. One was a 2 year old that was basically given to us, and I gave her to a trainer who now uses her for lessons. Another was sold to a couple who live about 1.5 miles from here. She is still living in a corral. According to the farrier we share, Lilly is doing great. And the vet and the farrier say my horses are all healthy...so it seems this completely inexperienced owner has been 5 for 5 in keeping healthy horses in a corral.

Since none of the horses I know living in corrals have problems, I conclude that living in a corral does not cause problems. From what I've seen, stupid and neglectful owners cause problems, and will do so regardless of pasture, corral or stall.
Dude, the key word in my sentence was "stalled" not corralled.

I'm glad that you are 5 for 5. You seem to have a very limited experience, though. Tell me, how do you explain all the smart and attentive owners who have horses that crib, weave, pace, lean, have ulcers? Oh wait, you don't know any horses who do that so they must not really exist.
     
    08-23-2013, 12:31 AM
  #49
Trained
You said stalled in direct response to my post describing "non-pasture living horses". I never said anything about stalled animals. I don't know anyone with a stall. I don't know why you brought stalls into the thread.

From the OP's first post:

"He doesn't have pasture land but he does have good sized paddocks for each horse and he feeds his horses well and they look well nourished and fine. This horse has never been pastured in the 5 years that they've had it and the horse is 8. So is not pastuing bad?"

The thread asks if PASTURE is NEEDED. The answer is no. Why? Because so many horses are kept healthy without access to pasture. And if someone with my limited experience can do it, it probably isn't very hard.

"Tell me, how do you explain all the smart and attentive owners who have horses that crib, weave, pace, lean, have ulcers?"

When I meet one, I'll let you know. But again - if a great many healthy, content horses in southern Arizona are doing fine without access to pastures, then pastures are not a requirement. BTW - for cribbing, Wiki is your friend:

"Current research in this field indicates that the prevention of these stereotypic behaviors is based upon management conditions which allow daily free movement and feeding practices that provide higher amounts of roughage and limited amounts of concentrates. A growing body of work suggests that fat and fiber-based diets may also result in calmer patterns of behavior."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cribbi...orse%29#Causes
     
    08-23-2013, 10:07 AM
  #50
Yearling
I think you just made my point. Thanks.

Prevention of colic: daily free movement.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Kids horses, show horses, & ranch horses for sale .Delete. Horses for Sale 9 04-22-2013 06:30 PM
Pastured Horses. Iseul Horse Training 9 01-30-2013 11:29 PM
Putting a pastured horse on to 24/7 stall rest? wild_spot Horse Health 14 08-28-2012 02:19 AM
If your horse is pastured.. furbabymum Horse Talk 15 01-24-2012 03:46 PM
best supplement for pastured horses? garlicbunny Horse Health 6 01-23-2012 08:07 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0