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Do you make your horses run around?

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        12-26-2013, 09:05 PM
      #11
    Started
    I don't want to sound like a crazy person :P I lunge my horses too! On and off lines. My only complaint is how I've seen this "free lunging" done - where the horse is literally just being chased until tired.

    This is my mare working on her liberty lunging skills:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S3EjeoMFbFE
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        12-26-2013, 09:07 PM
      #12
    Weanling
    I drive them away from me sometimes when I need my space, nothing more entertaining then watching my gelding run off bucking and farting and come back to see what I don't want him messing with as soon as I turn my back.
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        12-26-2013, 09:09 PM
      #13
    Super Moderator
    We have worked with horses in arenas that are too large to be able to keep up a very good driving position, and we use two persons, one at the locus of reach half circle of each short end of the arena. We do "chase" the hroses. We don't do it endlessly, but it can be used to get a hrose that is really holding back to open up and respond with a good forward burst when a handler asks him to. We will sometiems put two horses in the arena and use two persons, with whips, to keep the horses going. So, we are chasing them, so to speak. But, it's with the purpose of getting a horse that is dull to the pressure to open up and GO!.

    Once they do this, it can take so little to get them to just transition upward with a forward spring. Then you can get the hrose to go up from a walk to a trot, and a trot to a fast trot with the breath and a very light wave of your hand.

    And, the horses actually get a kick out of. I really think they do. But, there is some risk of injury. Heck, there's risk of oinjury every time you take them out.
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        12-26-2013, 09:13 PM
      #14
    Weanling
    I let my mare loose in the arena, but don't chase her. I've always been scared that doing this might make a horse hard to catch, but I don't know if there is any truth behind that.

    I just let her loose, shoo her off once so she knows she's free (she might canter away with a buck or two but usually just trots away ) and then let her do whatever she wants, which is usually a roll, sniffing around searching for bits of grass, and following me around. I never chase her endlessly.
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        12-26-2013, 09:19 PM
      #15
    Started
    PT- what you're describing is very different from what I do with my guy, and what I see most people around me doing. There is no 'chasing'- after a few steps towards him, he takes off and I stand on the edge, lean on the gate and watch him gallop about. If he comes towards me and he's all prancy-bouncy still, I'll trot towards him a few steps and wave an arm and off he goes again, and back I go to standing and watching him. When he walks up to me quietly rather and being a ball of fizz, we're done. I am certainly not running about or after him, and in a 300ft long arena, there's certainly plenty of room for him to avoid any perceived 'pressure.'

    I agree that mindless chasing, like mindless running in circles at the end of a lunge line or in a round pen are not constructive for horse or human though people do it all to often. All they end up with is a more fit but still untrained horse who has learned you're not really someone worth trying to communicate with since you never listen or do things that make any horse-sense.
         
        12-26-2013, 09:35 PM
      #16
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Houston    
    I let my mare loose in the arena, but don't chase her. I've always been scared that doing this might make a horse hard to catch, but I don't know if there is any truth behind that.

    I just let her loose, shoo her off once so she knows she's free (she might canter away with a buck or two but usually just trots away ) and then let her do whatever she wants, which is usually a roll, sniffing around searching for bits of grass, and following me around. I never chase her endlessly.

    If you can't move your horse away from you, and draw it back, then that is soemthing to work on. The horse can easily tell when your intention is to make him move away from you, and when you have no such intention and are only approaching him. If you and your horse don't have this level of communication, it would be something interesting to work on.

    You should be as able to send your horse off as to draw him back, and pushing him off , then NOT chasing him, he should move a bit, turn and ask to come back with his ears and eyes on you. Just becuase you mvoe him off, does not mean you break the connection. If so, you work to rebuild it by drawing his attention back on yourself.
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        12-26-2013, 09:52 PM
      #17
    Showing
    Punk, driving a horse away a couple of times actually reinforces it's connection with the handler. I do this periodically to reinforce this. It's not mindless round pen running but actually moving the horse away. The way Sammy is doing it, where does her horse go after his burst of energy, but back to her. That's what you want. I have one that is so sensitive I will move my hands like shooing chickens. I don't necessarily want a lot of energy, but sometimes just get him to move off even at the walk.
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        12-26-2013, 09:54 PM
      #18
    Green Broke
    I do two different things with my horse.

    I no longer need to chase him. I unclip him, point and say "Go" and off he goes. Usually I will leave him alone after that and he will run, spook, buck, etc all on his own. When he gets bored (after 15-20 mins), I will free lunge him, using cues to control his gaits and direction. Right now I have access to an 80x200 indoor and we use all of it. He still listens even if he's way at the other end. Right now I've been teaching him how to come in and do circles (he will only do them at the short end though) and how to figure 8. The flying lead changes be throws in on his own.
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        12-26-2013, 10:04 PM
      #19
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
    Punk, driving a horse away a couple of times actually reinforces it's connection with the handler. I do this periodically to reinforce this. It's not mindless round pen running but actually moving the horse away. The way Sammy is doing it, where does her horse go after his burst of energy, but back to her. That's what you want. I have one that is so sensitive I will move my hands like shooing chickens. I don't necessarily want a lot of energy, but sometimes just get him to move off even at the walk.
    I completely understand this. The way everyone here seems to say they do it, makes perfect sense.
    But what I see all too often in my area, and was taught to do by a barn I worked at was to chase the horse until they were tired. Sometimes so they were better for a rider or because they weren't ridden that day and they felt they needed to horse to run around more. The horse could do anything they wanted - but they needed to keep moving no matter what. I was never allowed to relieve the pressure - even if the horse was begging me to stop. I only stopped when told to - reinforcing nothing to the horse, leaving me to have to try and catch the horse I'd been mindlessly chasing. Usually the horses became so desensitized to the whip cracking all around them (and nothing they do to relieve it) that I would literally have to run up beside them swinging the whip very close to their hip before they'd jog off.

    It doesn't sound like the people on here are doing that, it sounds more like you're doing some basic pushing and drawing horses away and back, but using an entire arena.
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        12-27-2013, 03:21 PM
      #20
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PunksTank    
    I don't want to sound like a crazy person :P I lunge my horses too! On and off lines. My only complaint is how I've seen this "free lunging" done - where the horse is literally just being chased until tired.

    This is my mare working on her liberty lunging skills:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S3EjeoMFbFE

    I am not a Klaus Hempfling "fan" ( I mean I don't follow him or think he's God or . .), but if you watch him working at liberty wiht a horse, you see that what sets him apart is that he moves WITH the hrose. He does not stand mutely in the middle, but speaks through his body. There is so much meaning in the way he stands, leans or straightens his body, the speed of his feet moving, which direction he faces. It creates a back and forth feedback loop with the horse that one cannot see in the case of a handler who stands stock still in the middle and points.

    When you stand stock still in the middle and point, you expect the hrose to do all the work, to interpret you and to go around without any connection until the next hand signal. It means the handler has not real responsibility, and does not have to pay really careful attention to the horse, since it is a one way communication (handler to horse), and not a loop.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRJ8kFZZpWw
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