Donating my horse to a program temporarily to be trained
   

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Donating my horse to a program temporarily to be trained

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        07-10-2014, 04:34 PM
      #1
    Foal
    Donating my horse to a program temporarily to be trained

    This is a really specific and random question but...
    I am looking into donating my horse to a program for a duration of at least 6-9 months (if not longer) in which she can be used for riding, training, or teaching. I want a program in either the Mid-Atlantic or Northeast area, or somewhere around there. (I'm from the southern PA area).
    The best offer I have found so far is Meredith Manor Equestrian Center. I would pay $250/month for board but she would be used and worked constantly in the program, and then when the program was complete I would have her back once again.
    I considered donating to an equestrian team at a college but that is so permanent and I'm not looking for something that permanent. I would like to have my horse back after I graduate from high school (next summer) and show her at that point, but I want to focus on my equitation and showing this year so I want to lease this upcoming year.
    Thanks!
         
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        07-10-2014, 05:09 PM
      #2
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iDressage    
    This is a really specific and random question but...
    I am looking into donating my horse to a program for a duration of at least 6-9 months (if not longer) in which she can be used for riding, training, or teaching. I want a program in either the Mid-Atlantic or Northeast area, or somewhere around there. (I'm from the southern PA area).
    The best offer I have found so far is Meredith Manor Equestrian Center. I would pay $250/month for board but she would be used and worked constantly in the program, and then when the program was complete I would have her back once again.
    I considered donating to an equestrian team at a college but that is so permanent and I'm not looking for something that permanent. I would like to have my horse back after I graduate from high school (next summer) and show her at that point, but I want to focus on my equitation and showing this year so I want to lease this upcoming year.
    Thanks!
    I rode at the University Of Findlay's western program for 3 years. They are #1 in the nation for what they do. They are costly, but can be worth it.

    From the other end of these programs I'd like to offer you some advice. Don't send your horse to one

    I can't speak for these other programs, but you don't know who will be riding you horse. You don't know what they will be doing with your horse. You don't know the care they will get, you don't know anything about what is going on.

    Sometimes you get lucky and get a really good rider who does a world of good for your horse. But understand something, 90% of people in these college programs are not the best riders. That is why they are there. Out of my class of 75, about 6 of them were decent hands.

    I've personally seen so many people's horses ruined because they sent them to these kind of programs. So so many horror stories. Seriously, don't put your horse through that.

    Have you considered leasing her?
         
        07-10-2014, 05:17 PM
      #3
    Super Moderator
    I looked into sending a couple of horses to a college in the UK and it took me about half a page of the literature they sent me, to decide against it!

    For a star, pupils pay them for the courses. It is up to them to provide the animals in the programme. Of people are kind enough to lend them a horse then I do not think a livery fee should be charged.

    Secondly, as said above many of these entrants are not good riders.

    Thirdly, many of the people in charge are not people I would want to employ. They are not very I good and if they are teaching the pupils what hope os there that the horse on loan will be improved?

    I would rather loan the horse to a reliable person.
    iDressage likes this.
         
        07-10-2014, 05:20 PM
      #4
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Foxhunter    
    I looked into sending a couple of horses to a college in the UK and it took me about half a page of the literature they sent me, to decide against it!

    For a star, pupils pay them for the courses. It is up to them to provide the animals in the programme. Of people are kind enough to lend them a horse then I do not think a livery fee should be charged.

    Secondly, as said above many of these entrants are not good riders.

    Thirdly, many of the people in charge are not people I would want to employ. They are not very I good and if they are teaching the pupils what hope os there that the horse on loan will be improved?

    I would rather loan the horse to a reliable person.
    The fact that these kids are paying a college to let them ride. They have to give everyone a horse. An they usually give the well behaved ones to the worst riders for "liability" reasons.

    I've seen some really fantastic horses fall apart because they HAD to put that person on a horse, and that horse was the unlucky winner.

    These places are all money driven. Sad to say, because there are some really fantastic people there and such great teachers. However, it's the people who aren't so great that you have to worry about.
    Foxhunter and KigerQueen like this.
         
        07-10-2014, 05:35 PM
      #5
    Super Moderator
    Its rather depressing really because they are supposed to be producing the trainers of the future but I know several people that sent their horses to UK Equestrian Colleges and were very unhappy with the way they were kept and/or ridden - and they were not horse owners that I would describe as being overly fussy and picky - they just like things done right
    I have a horse here that was in a Northeast college and apparently the students all hated her and were afraid of her which had turned her into a very unpleasant negative horse which she absolutely is not now - you couldn't wish for an easier more pleasant animal.
    So based on my few experiences - No I wouldn't suggest you do it.
    Is this the horse that has some arthritis issues?
         
        07-10-2014, 05:38 PM
      #6
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jaydee    
    Its rather depressing really because they are supposed to be producing the trainers of the future but I know several people that sent their horses to UK Equestrian Colleges and were very unhappy with the way they were kept and/or ridden - and they were not horse owners that I would describe as being overly fussy and picky - they just like things done right
    I have a horse here that was in a Northeast college and apparently the students all hated her and were afraid of her which had turned her into a very unpleasant negative horse which she absolutely is not now - you couldn't wish for an easier more pleasant animal.
    So based on my few experiences - No I wouldn't suggest you do it.
    Is this the horse that has some arthritis issues?
    They have produced really good trainers. The University Of Findlay produced Stacy Westfall and a handful of other "famous" trainers. However, this is very....very rare. As most of the people that come to them are less than talented.
    KigerQueen likes this.
         
        07-10-2014, 06:18 PM
      #7
    Weanling
    I'd suggest to lease the horse to someone (after seeing him/her riding style and deciding that your horse would benefit from it). And, the horse should stay in a barn that you can visit weekly. Every 2 weeks at top most. There are so many horror stories, when you give your horse to someone who should care for him, and then you find the horse... starved, manhandled, scared to death of things that he didn't mind before, having untreated conditions (worms, cuts, whatever), being ridden with open wounds on the back from an ill fitting saddle, oozing pus from the sides from spurs or a bleeding mouth from an harsh bit and harsher hands; being kept in his feces for days, being ridden so hard he's dead lame, being shoed incorrectly and then ridden too hard... nope, don't do it.

    Find a compromise where you can go anytime and see firsthand that the horse is still healthy and well cared for and well ridden. If your horse starts losing weight, or acting scared or sick, or if he has visible welts from being beaten, you should be able to notice in time, not 9 months afterwards.
         
        07-10-2014, 06:44 PM
      #8
    Weanling
    Wait a second........ the college would get your horse to do with as they please for the school year and they are asking you to pay them $250 a month??? That doesn't exactly compute in this noggin of mine. College gets the tuition money from the students, uses your horse that they didn't have to purchase, and gets money from you too?

    I'd be running in the other direction right fast. Even if the school was top notch and I knew of every person that was going to be interacting with my horse.

    If you and your horse are not in the same place in life right now, but you don't want to sell, consider leasing to somebody instead. I was leasing (well, still am til end of July) for just over a year until I knew I was ready to be owned by my mare. It worked well.
    KigerQueen likes this.
         
        07-10-2014, 07:33 PM
      #9
    Foal
    Yeah you're all right in the sense that this just isn't adding up very well. I'm definitely crossing this idea off the list. I'm not ready to trust anyone else with my mare yet, either. Thank you!
    .Delete. and Cielo Notturno like this.
         
        07-11-2014, 02:42 AM
      #10
    Started
    I have herd less than stellar things about MM. The horses RARELY get turn out. The students take care of them and the farrier school does all the shoeing. I would not do it.

    IF I was to ever lend my horse to a program it would be AAEC (my old high school) because the teachers teach western and therefor not contact (they also teach english but the students have to know how to ride first so no one is hanging on the horse's face). They are also hard on the student when it comes to their hands because they don't want to ruin the horse's mouth.
         

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