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Equine Meat at my Local Grocer

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        01-20-2014, 04:07 PM
      #51
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Celeste    
    Yes humans can eat horses, rats, dogs, cats, lizards, snakes, bugs, and a lot of other things. I will have to be a lot hungrier than I am to try any of the above.
    Oh, you are missing out. Snake (and the few other types of reptiles I've partaken of) is better than chicken. Taste better with a nicer texture. Prettier meat too. Nice and clean looking right out of the skin (easier to clean too). All the reptiles I've had taste better than chicken (although I've never cared for frog legs as much). After my first snake while survival camping as a teen they became a "game" animal for me. While they do taste great roasted over a fire I enjoy being able to be versatile with them and use them with other dishes in the kitchen. And give me a nice meaty snapping turtle for making soup any day.

    And by-the-by....snakes and the like are better for you health wise than the domestic "food" animals we raise (cattle, pork, chicken), although goat is rather healthy nutritional domestic animal (possibly the second after equine).

    Now I'm hungry and not a snake around .
         
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        01-20-2014, 04:24 PM
      #52
    Trained
    Does anybody know where the "don't like" button is?
         
        01-20-2014, 05:33 PM
      #53
    Super Moderator
    I agree that snake is very good. I've had rattlesnake in this country and Asian snake soup in Asia. I have also eaten iguana, which doesn't take anything from the fact that I used to rehab sick iguanas and find them good homes afterwards. I often eat raccoon and squirrel and will be getting my first opossum stew this week.

    I trap varmints because they attack my chicken coops. I believe in trying to make use of anything I have to kill. The lady who dispatches them for me also cooks them up. She used to discard the possum, but I told her that I had heard it was good. She cooked the last one and agreed it was very good. She is bringing me a jar of the stew. I have also eaten groundhog and muskrat (which was incredibly good. Better than beef).
    Meat is meat, as I keep saying.
         
        01-20-2014, 06:07 PM
      #54
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by its lbs not miles    
    Ok, let's get rid of the emotion of eating a pet (for those with hang ups about it).
    My objection to eating horse is not based on emotion. It's based on the physiological differences between horses and cattle. Compared to cattle, horses are more reactive, they kick each other in close quarters, they are afraid of going into trailers at the best of times, and they have longer, more mobile necks that make it easier for them to avoid the stun gun. What is humane treatment for cattle is not necessarily humane treatment for horses.

    People like to say that "meat is meat" but we don't train goats to hunt or get cats to pull carts. We treat animals differently because they ARE different, and that should include how they are slaughtered.

    If I were in Iceland I would eat horse because they have better methods of slaughter there. North American methods just aren't good enough. They aren't good enough for pigs either which is why I don't eat them.
         
        01-20-2014, 06:25 PM
      #55
    Super Moderator
    Have you personally observed horse slaughter?

    If not, then whose scientific 'live and in person' observations have you scrutinized.

    Or are you going by the very biased propaganda put forth by the radical Animal Rights activists like the HSUS, etc?
    smrobs, Allison Finch and Clava like this.
         
        01-20-2014, 09:01 PM
      #56
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ponyboy    
    My objection to eating horse is not based on emotion. It's based on the physiological differences between horses and cattle. Compared to cattle, horses are more reactive, they kick each other in close quarters, they are afraid of going into trailers at the best of times, and they have longer, more mobile necks that make it easier for them to avoid the stun gun. What is humane treatment for cattle is not necessarily humane treatment for horses.

    People like to say that "meat is meat" but we don't train goats to hunt or get cats to pull carts. We treat animals differently because they ARE different, and that should include how they are slaughtered.

    If I were in Iceland I would eat horse because they have better methods of slaughter there. North American methods just aren't good enough. They aren't good enough for pigs either which is why I don't eat them.
    You apparently haven't dealt with cattle a great deal.
    About the only thing that horses do that cows don't is bite (but horses have upper and lower teeth while cows only have lower teeth). But then cows will head butt and heaven help them if some have horns, because goring will also be a norm (something you never have to worry about with horses.....unless you found a unicorn , but although mythical, they were more correctly more like a large goat than a true horse). I'm not sure where you got the image what cattle are like vs horses, but it's a bit flawed.
    (I'm qualifying the following is with non feed lot livestock, since we kept all our cattle on grazing they didn't have a feed lot behavior)
    I've never seen cattle load as easily as a horse. The reason we can usually "force" cattle easier than horses is because in most cases horses tend to be larger and more powerful that cattle (although you get a 2,000 lb bull with a bad attitude and I'd rather deal with an unruly 1,000 lb horse). You can still load a horse on a lead through 4' door. With an 8' opening we still had to force the cattle in by eliminating the ability to exit from behind so forward was their only option.
    Of course you cut down on the risk of injury any animal is subjected to by having processing facilities close enough to cut down on travel time, so every state should have at least one or more depending on size. That would be the more humane thing.

    If using a bullet, as long as the line of the trajectory passes through a point about half way between the eyes and the ears the result is the same. The concussion will knock them out and in most cases cause death. If the concussion does not kill them right then they'll die from the injury before they ever regain consciousness. I've never seen someone have a problem hitting the right spot. (note: do not shoot them between the eyes. It will just blow out the sinuses and might not knock them out).
    Using a piston, while I've never actually seen that done on a horse, would be much the same except that it has a larger impact surface area. Meaning you have a greater variation of exactly where the impact is needed since as long as part of it is on the correct trajectory (from any area along the front or sides it will work) the result will be the same....knocked out by and usually killed by the concussion, but if not already killed will die before regaining consciousness. Of course with a piston you can also come from the top and that's a sure thing.
    Yes, we raised stock and we did this enough to know with cows, hogs, goats, etc.... Of course I imaging it was different for the chickens since they usually got their neck wrung (hate cleaning poultry).

    What we do or don't use an animal for has not bearing on it's value as a food item. In point of fact the animals that serve a purpose beyond their potential for food are the better choices. They're productiveness makes them a better choice. Of course in the case of cats you're lucky if 1 in 10 is actually useful for anything beyond killing birds and lizards (they're seldom much good at catching mice but are the most destructive of all animals in terms of damaging non pest wild life). In 20 years my grandparents had two that were any good. One eventually died of old age and the other (a "tom") after about 7 years sampled a chicken and decided that he liked it. A couple days later he got caught in the act and.....then my ferrets were all we used to keep out the pests. (unfortunately I was still in my teens and didn't yet know that cat tasted like rabbit....oh well)

    But then you've established that you'll eat horse so long as it comes from Iceland, so it's still "meat is meat" . You just want it to come from someplace else.
         
        01-20-2014, 11:09 PM
      #57
    Yearling
    I lived in Puerto Rico for a a while and discovered quickly that Puerto Ricans have little liking or use for dogs and cats. Now horses, on the other hand, were adored and you would see them tied out on roadsides all over the island, even grazing calmly in the middle of a highway cloverleaf. Folks in city apartments had horses, they just picketed them in different spots around the city, and no one seemed to be bothered about it. They were mainly the lithe little Paso Finos, and most Puerto Ricans loved to talk about those horses!

    There are wild dogs everywhere and they are a big problem for parents of small children because they would attack a child with food in their hands. The cats were quite nasty, crapping on your porch, in a "statement" of possession. Both brought ticks, fleas, and disease. We trapped some and took them to a shelter, but there were so many, it was overwhelming.

    Roadside food vendors are everywhere in PR, and actually the best place to get food. If you really want hot, creamy doughnuts first thing in the morning, just roll down your window at the intersection. If you want fresh lettuce, and not the wilted wad they sell in the store, you could find it at Calle Wilson & 37.

    The best eats were pincho stands. They sold skewers of meat barbecue right there, after a long soak in a green or red sauce. Buy a pincho and a coco frio and you had a heavenly meal. But we all knew there was no guarantees about what kind of meat was in that pincho. And curiously, the wild dogs did not pester those pincho stands. In fact, they were nowhere in sight of pincho stands.
    Allison Finch, Celeste and boots like this.
         
        01-21-2014, 01:04 AM
      #58
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ponyboy    
    My objection to eating horse is not based on emotion. It's based on the physiological differences between horses and cattle. Compared to cattle, horses are more reactive, they kick each other in close quarters, they are afraid of going into trailers at the best of times, and they have longer, more mobile necks that make it easier for them to avoid the stun gun. What is humane treatment for cattle is not necessarily humane treatment for horses.
    Have you ever gotten within a mile of a cow!!??

    I have a bull at my place that ended up needing an abscess drained after granny cow decided he was eating more than his fair share of the protein cakes, booted him one and then stuck a horn into him.

    Last week a coyote decided he wanted a nice chicken dinner. My COW stomped on the coyote after he grabbed a chicken. I'd say that's pretty darn reactive and my then slimy silkie escaped to tell the tale.

    Last of all..... if you think cows WANT to go into trailers. I have a welded metal pen, chute and swinging gates. All of which are very necessary to shove cows on into a trailer. There is no bribing a cow into a trailer with food, there is no pointing and watching a cow load up. No, you chase them into the trailer and they go in because they think the trailer is less scary than the human with the cattle prod!

    A horse does have a longer neck, I will give you that. However, when you consider that you shove the cow into such tight quarters it has no choice about evading the death shot...
    smrobs, Allison Finch and picup436 like this.
         
        01-21-2014, 10:51 AM
      #59
    Super Moderator
    The most far reaching example of the "meat is meat" was the plane crash in the Andes.

    If you are too young to remember it, a plane full of South American rugby players, and their families, crashed on a mountaintop in the Andes. The 45 of them (29 survived the crash) were there for more than 72 days. 16 survived the subzero temps, avalanches and death due to injuries sustained in the crash. There was nothing but snow and ice on that mountain top. Needless to say, the dead were the only source of food left to them.

    As horrible as it was, they survived. When they were rescued, they were all of the opinion that they would be vilified and even excommunicated by the Catholic Church, of which they were all members.

    The pope did something that will forever have my respect. He assured each survivor that what they did was absolutely acceptable, since they only fed on the dead, not killing anyone for this. In fact, he carried it even farther. He said that God provided that meat for them and, if they had not partaken of it, they would have spurned him and essentially commit suicide (which IS a huge sin).

    I, for one, was pretty amazed at the far thinking of this pontiff. Even he recognized that "meat is meat".
         
        01-21-2014, 03:20 PM
      #60
    Yearling
    And "we" taste like pork (hence the old nautical term "long pork" which meant they were down to eating humans)

    Granted it's been a "few" years, but I seem to recall that all the of the final survivors were men (although there were women who survived the crash). Aside of some events that killed others, there apparently were some who had issues with eating what was available (and died).

    Actually starvation is an interesting subject since it's mostly about the brain and the brain can basically "starve" even when you have enough to eat, but not enough fat. The common term for that is rabbit starvation (plenty of meat, but it's too lean). It's why in cases like the Donner Expedition eating the dead (or the starved and near dead) didn't help. It was all lean with no fat. The human body (especially the brain) needs some fat. Even the lean cuts of most animals have a degree of fat (rabbits tend to not have much and are exceedingly lean in the wild)

    The guys in the Andes had bodies that had been well fed at the time of death and quickly frozen so well preserved. Not the remains of starving people who had already burned off any fat reserves they had.
    boots likes this.
         

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