Gaited horses : Do they gait in the pasture? - Page 2
 
 

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Gaited horses : Do they gait in the pasture?

This is a discussion on Gaited horses : Do they gait in the pasture? within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Horses that they break thier gait
  • Do gaited foals pace when very young?

 
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    09-25-2012, 09:59 PM
  #11
Started
My STB was BORN a pacer.
She paces and trots in the field and when riding ( I usually never ask her to as I have no reason to.)
     
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    09-26-2012, 12:11 AM
  #12
Green Broke
My Missouri Fox Trotter gaits when loose in her pen. Sometimes it is a fox trot, other times a pace.

What's interesting is her foal, who is sired by a QH, gaited for about the first month of his life and then "lost" the gait and has been trotting ever since. (He's two now and I haven't ridden him yet but I assume the gait is gone).

I have been told that gaiting is common in foals due to their flexibility. And that just because a foal gaits doesn't mean it will as an adult. Does anyone know how true that is???

Here is my mare fox trotting at liberty, and her foal doing a lateral gait a day or two after birth.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg izzy foxtrot.jpg (57.0 KB, 51 views)
File Type: jpg zane gait 2.jpg (68.5 KB, 52 views)
     
    09-26-2012, 12:21 PM
  #13
Weanling
It's hit or miss. I know STB and TWH's that are pure gait, they gait under saddle, they gait under lunge line, they gait in the pasture of their own accord. But SOMETIMES, usually on like an uphill climb, they might break gait and fall into a trot. It does not happen often on the horses I am personally familiar with.

My MIL tried to retrain one of her ex-race horse STB pacers, pure pacer, to trot so she could jump him. He was very resistant to trotting under saddle, even with trot poles. Was not happening.

MFT's might trot, but because their gait is a 4 beat gait, their trot is something funky. Like, you can tell when they have broken their 4 beat gait and start pacing. But I was trail riding one day and the MFT mare I was riding was doing something funky. It wasn't her gait, and it wasn't a pace. It wasn't a trot either, but something similar, like it felt like a trot without any impulsion, because I couldn't post it for the life of me and it didn't sit like a normal trot.
     
    09-26-2012, 01:15 PM
  #14
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
My Missouri Fox Trotter gaits when loose in her pen. Sometimes it is a fox trot, other times a pace

What's interesting is her foal, who is sired by a QH, gaited for about the first month of his life and then "lost" the gait and has been trotting ever since. (He's two now and I haven't ridden him yet but I assume the gait is gone).

I have been told that gaiting is common in foals due to their flexibility. And that just because a foal gaits doesn't mean it will as an adult. Does anyone know how true that is???

Here is my mare fox trotting at liberty, and her foal doing a lateral gait a day or two after birth.
With Saddlebreds it is. Really young babies will sometimes have the tendency to rack along with their moms. It is easier to keep up. They soon discover the trot and they usually won't do it again. Out in the field. Truly natural gaited saddlebreds(by sefinition) are very rare.

If they are built right, have the right attitude and LOOK about them, then in training, before they are taught the cues for canter under saddle, they are taught to rack. We are kind of choosy about who gets taught. Essentially, if they don't look like they will be competitive in that division, or look better suited for something else, we won't waste the time to try and gait them.
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