Gelding with a bad attitude
 
 

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Gelding with a bad attitude

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  • How to retrain an older horse with attitude
  • Why is my gelding interested in my mare

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  • 1 Post By BellaMFT

 
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    01-26-2012, 05:33 PM
  #1
Weanling
Gelding with a bad attitude

I thought I would get your guys opinion on something. Do you believe a horse as they get old can develop a bad attitude or that they can just get grumpier with age?

We have had my husband gelding for almost 6 years now he will be 13 this year. We have noticed that over last year or so his attitude is pretty bad.
He always had his ears pinned. When you try to pet him he pins his ears and acts like he is going to bit you. Even when he is coming up to you he has his ear pinned. Our farrier thinks it's funny that he is so grumpy but I am not so sure. I have tired ground work with him. He is fine once you get him saddled and you’re on the trail. The other thing is he constantly chases my mare around even though she is very submissive and would never challenge him. They have been together for a year.

My biggest fear is that my mare is going to foal in May and I am not sure if I want the foal in the same pasture with him. (Let me clarify that I don't plan of have momma and baby in that pasture for a month or two after the baby is born.)

I am having the vet out to checking to see if there is a pain reason for is attitude. But I don't think so because he runs around the pasture like he is 2.

Any thoughts?
     
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    01-26-2012, 05:42 PM
  #2
Trained
Sounds spoiled. If you feed him he should want to come over to see you when he's turned out--MY horses stop to visit, especially my giant 16'3hh gelding--the big head, left. Obviously he doesn't see YOU as the authority anymore. I wouldn't trust him with your mare bc he will probably hurt both she and her foal, maybe inadvertantly.
My 1st herd leader was a sonofagun (put nicely) and used to run off my old mare and my pony (1985.) I got a new horse a few months later, who took over the herd, established peace and let the weaker members eat with him. He was the toughest horse I've ever known but a babysitter to ride/handle.
Your gelding needs retraining.
     
    01-26-2012, 05:58 PM
  #3
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corporal    
Sounds spoiled. If you feed him he should want to come over to see you when he's turned out--MY horses stop to visit, especially my giant 16'3hh gelding--the big head, left. Obviously he doesn't see YOU as the authority anymore. I wouldn't trust him with your mare bc he will probably hurt both she and her foal, maybe inadvertantly.
My 1st herd leader was a sonofagun (put nicely) and used to run off my old mare and my pony (1985.) I got a new horse a few months later, who took over the herd, established peace and let the weaker members eat with him. He was the toughest horse I've ever known but a babysitter to ride/handle.
Your gelding needs retraining.
Thanks for the thoughts. We did send him to a train last year for a month but maybe we should think about it again. I think if we do that I am going to look for some one who can work with me and the horse together. Last time we just sent him to the trainer.
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    01-26-2012, 11:49 PM
  #4
Trained
Good luck
     
    01-27-2012, 12:35 AM
  #5
Started
I think it'd be a great idea to have a trainer work with you both. It did worlds of good with me and my horse.

We have a 26 year old mare that is a bit grumpy. However, we still expect the same manners out of her. To me, age is not an excuse for bad behavior. Besides thirteen is old, IMO.
     
    01-27-2012, 12:46 AM
  #6
Super Moderator
It is good that you will have this change in attitude checked out by a vet, because pain will make anyone grumpy. Like an ulcer, that is a real grump maker. It's hard to know if that is the reason, but it's the first to eliminate.

In addition, I would not allow him to approach with his ears pinned. If he walks up to you with his ears pinned, step toward him a tiny bit and slap your thigh and see if he doesn't put his ears up . If he pins 'em more, slap your thight hard and swish him away from you a step or two, and then him turn and look at you to see what the heck you are asking of him. Then invite him to come in and see if he won't come in with a more interested, curious attitude.
Coming toward you is a privilidge. YOu will interupt him if he's walking toward you like he owns you. It is using a very simple to , if necessary, a harsh reminder that he comes when invited and asks "mother may I?" each step of the way.
     
    01-27-2012, 01:33 AM
  #7
Weanling
Thanks Tiny, I will have to try that. I never thought about an ulcer. I considered back pain or joint pain. Good thought. I'll make sure to ask my vet when he comes out. I'm having him out on Monday.
     
    01-27-2012, 01:49 AM
  #8
Super Moderator
I only thought of the ulcer because my friend's gelding was like that and had some significant improvements after being treated for such. I think they scoped him to see if he did indeed have one. But , there's a filly in the pasture, I guess she's a mare , now, and I swear, she just wears the ugliest face when you approach her or she to you. She doesnt' bite or anything, but is the world's biggest sourpuss. Shame, too, 'cause she's a pretty thing.
     

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