"Gelding" Issues, really need opinions!
   

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"Gelding" Issues, really need opinions!

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  • RIG GELDING LUMP
  • Mare attraction to geldings

 
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    09-28-2008, 02:57 AM
  #1
Foal
"Gelding" Issues, really need opinions!

At the moment, I have an open mare I am quite worried about. Mostly because the last thing I need is a foal out of her (she has a club hoof, and couldn't take the extra weight of pregnancy) and she is about to be in a pasture near two geldings that I am not entirely sure are geldings.

My neighbors are horse idiots, and that is putting it gently. They bred a mare who had no place being bred because of her temperament and build to a stallion that no one made me aware of, (in the pasture across from my own horses! I had foals and broodmares in there!) who is impossible to deal with, twice and got two brother stallions. They are almost exactly 11 months apart because the second one went a little early. They both have the horrible personalities and will not be touched. One is extremely aggressive and the other is very skiddish to the point that I think he would strike out in fear.

The problem comes from the fact that I suspect the aggressive one retained a testicle. You can see it when he turns his hind end to you as a slightly larger than a golfball lump. He has gone through the motions with a COW, and I am pretty sure I saw some residue left on the cow once he "finished." The other gelding I cannot get close enough to to actually tell whether or not he was really gelded or not. I have a rig gelding who is very manageable, but I don't think he is a rig. I think he just wasn't gelded right.

According to the owners, they were cut in the spring. They procedure was done at no cost by someone who was not a vet, they laughed calling him an "all around cowhand" who "used the practice for the cows". I've seen this guy's work before on their cows in the form of stitches and the like, and they are vastly overestimating his ability. I've asked them, even offered to pay for the visit, for my vet to look at the guys when he comes down next time for my pregnant mare's shots. They said they trust the cowhand's work and don't need a vet to look at the "geldings".

How do I even begin to go about dealing with this? I have found out that during the brief time my high-end broodmares were open (I raise Tennessee Walkers) there was a QH (think he is) stallion with horrible manners who cannot even be touched just across a rickety fence that we had to fix even though it's not on our property. He could have easily jumped it or run straight through it. Now we know two of his sons were just across the creek, which is easily crossable for any animal that put their minds to it, but are now directly across the fence. I have put up very strong electric fence around the whole property in the last month, along with 5' high dog mesh wire where the two "geldings" are.

Is there anything else I can do? I've strengthened fences, offered to cover the cost of their gelding *myself* just to get it over with (I'm pretty desperate), asked if they could be moved, and kept my mares away from them as long as possible. Unfortunately, my open mare must be moved up there because of barn construction. There is no alternative to her moving into this pasture. My super protective (guard dog) gelding is also going in with her, and I am afraid he might attack the two "geldings" if one of his mares are around. He nearly went at them today while I was riding him because he was trying to protect me. This is how aggressive these two "geldings" are. Yet these people are amazed that they can't halter them, stick their 4 year old daughter on him, and let them walk around the pen. They keep saying "Your horses let you do just anything! Mine won't let me do that, I wonder why? Do you give your horses shots to calm them down?"

I have sat down with the owners and asked them just to help out a little, not to mention attempting to educate them on the matter. They told me that they didn't see the big deal if their stallion bred to my mare, that they thought it would throw a great foal like the two "geldings", maybe even am amazing breeding stallion like theirs! I wasn't sure whether to laugh or walk out when they said that. I'm worried that I will have two foals on the ground in June of next year and they might not have gotten rid of this guy. Their field surrounds three sides of our farm, and he is pastured in that one field. So it's not a matter of moving our mare/foal pasture to another section of the property. So, any thoughts? Advice? Sorry this is so long!

Thanks
Angi
     
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    09-28-2008, 08:30 AM
  #2
Showing
I really feel bad for you. In your situation there seems to be no dealing with your neighbors so, if you can't move your mare, you need to reinforce your own fencing.

You may have to put in a double fence about 2' apart as a secondary barrier. Although I dislike barbed wire immensely, that may need to be a consideration as the outside fence (facing the neighbor not your horses) along with more electric. As you already know, there is nothing stronger then the attraction of a mare in heat to a stallion. The fear I would have with one of those horses getting in with your mare, aside from an unwanted pregnancy, is your horse getting hurt from one of neighbor's "geldings".

To quote the name of a book written by comedian Ron White, "You can't fix stupid".
     
    09-28-2008, 11:31 AM
  #3
Foal
That's quite a dilemma and it sounds like you've done about all you can do unfortunately. I swear there should be some kind of test for people before they can even have a horse. So many people have them that should not own anything more than a Breyer horse.

I guess you could threaten them with a lawsuit or something if one of their "geldings" gets in with your horses but then you run the risk of making mortal enemies of them. Sheesh, it's a shame you can't pick your neighbors.
     
    09-28-2008, 03:36 PM
  #4
Foal
Thanks guys. I have fixed their barbed wire, so it will be barbed wire and electric fence about an inch and a half apart. But somehow, from his behaviour, I doubt it would stop him if he really really wanted out. We are the smallest landowner out there, 14 acres, and the rest are owned by a family. Yes, they are all this completely stupid.

However, I do feel a bit better every time the "geldings" mother *mysteriously* bucks him off. I'll give the mare some credit, she gets some height with the people she throws. I keep hoping that maybe she'll knock some sense in to him.

Honestly I'm more worried that my two geldings will kill their "geldings". I have a very protective Walker and a rig QH that will be going in that pasture. Not to mention a mean as all get out alpha mare (my mom's horse, great in saddle, throws lovely show babies but is a pain in the pasture). If the "geldings" are at all aggressive, my guys are going to be too. The owner keeps promising me he will move them before we put my horses in the pasture adjoining theirs (sometime this week) but I haven't seen any prep in other pastures to hold these guys.

There really should be a test. I've offered vet fees, fencing, training for the "geldings" that would mean time taken away from my own horses, tried to educate them, and the list goes on. I'm considering rephrasing all this in terms of money so maybe they'll understand that. Let them know that if they continue to act as they are, they will be paying for vet fees to get everyone stitched back up, cost of the horse (all mine are worth $3,000 plus, not to mention that the emotional attachment) if a leg breaks and there is no way to recover (this is how aggressive these horses are, I am not overstating), cost of vet to abort to foal if that happens, cost to put the fence back together, and the list goes on. If they get into my pasture and get anywhere near my mares in foal and my 4 month old filly, I'll lose it. They are in a separate place from my geldings. Maybe once they realize that they'll be paying for all this if something happens, because I will sue, they'll come slightly to their senses. They have 1000 acres, there has to be somewhere else to stick them. If they want to treat them like cows, put them with the cows. As you say, might not make for friendly neighbors, but my first priority is my herd. I'm a horse person, not a people person .

Thanks for your answers, and for letting me vent.
Angi
     

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