Getting land ready?
 
 

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Getting land ready?

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  • Getting acreage ready for a horse
  • How to get my land ready for horses

 
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    09-09-2009, 07:35 PM
  #1
Foal
Getting land ready?

Hi, so I don't have a horse yet, but really want one soonish. Anyways about 5 mins away from where I live, my grandma has about 160 acres. Most of it is trees and forest though. I was wondering if and how it is possible to clear a spot to house a couple horses? Cutting away the trees would leave stumps, some big, some small. How would you get rid of these so that the land is safe? Also my uncle is wanting to buy a bobcat soon, so we have that to level out the land with also. Im just not sure about what you hve to do to get land ready for a horse. Im a total newbie!

Also for two horses, is 1-1/5.5 acres enough? How much would be needed?


Also, what would the cost of feeding be? They will be in the pasture all the time, except for winters, we get crazy winters up here sometimes. So I know a lot or hay will be needed then.
     
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    09-09-2009, 11:28 PM
  #2
Started
In my opinion, if you want the horses to be able to graze all summer, that won't be enough acreage. I'd clear more than that if you are allowed. At my old barn we put four horses on an acre and they had it plowed down in no time. As for the stumps...id get rid of em and get the pasture ready for good green grass. I would leave some trees so they will have plenty of shade. Me and my sister both have a horse so we split the cost of feed. In the winter we go through a bale of hay a day (its $4 a bale here) and 2 bags of feed/oats a week ($8 a bag). My sisters horse is a very easy keeper though. Plus don't forget...you have to have a farrier every 8 weeks or so...plus, they have to be dewormed regularly and vaccinations. Did I forget anything? This has just been my experience....you may get some better advice by people who have owned horses longer.
     
    09-09-2009, 11:40 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Depending on how close the trees are you might not have to do much. I've known lots of horses to be kept in paddocks with trees. If you can find a semi clear spot then you could probably just use that.

Otherwise fencing is a big issue. You want good, solid fences that are safe, and wide, easy gates. In addition, you will need access to water. For paddocks installing an automatic water trough is often the best bet. It would be a good idea to maybe consider building a solid small yard to feed and tack up your horse in, as well as to tie your horse up to and keep it in if it needs to be contained (lame or something). It wouldn't be a bad idea to consider putting up a little shed to keep feed and tack in.

Although many horses can survive of pasture I always supplement their feeds with vitamins and minerals, as often the soil isn't rich enough to provide everything a horse needs.

I would probably get five acres (and absolute minimum for me would be 2 acres for two horses), and its often a good idea (if possible) to have two or three paddocks so that you can rotate the horses and allow the grass to rest/regrow. That will depend on your individual paddocks. Also ensure they have some shelter/windblock.

Also, check for any harmful weeds and weed paddock if necessary.
     
    09-09-2009, 11:46 PM
  #4
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by sandy2u1    
In my opinion, if you want the horses to be able to graze all summer, that won't be enough acreage. I'd clear more than that if you are allowed. At my old barn we put four horses on an acre and they had it plowed down in no time. As for the stumps...id get rid of em and get the pasture ready for good green grass. I would leave some trees so they will have plenty of shade. Me and my sister both have a horse so we split the cost of feed. In the winter we go through a bale of hay a day (its $4 a bale here) and 2 bags of feed/oats a week ($8 a bag). My sisters horse is a very easy keeper though. Plus don't forget...you have to have a farrier every 8 weeks or so...plus, they have to be dewormed regularly and vaccinations. Did I forget anything? This has just been my experience....you may get some better advice by people who have owned horses longer.

Alright, awesome! Thanks for replying! Sounds do-able! I think I would be able to do more land, but Im just not sure how much is needed. It will be a lot of work for me and my boyfriend to do! Also were doing our own fence. Oh, and our barn...

So in the spring, summer, and fall, when they have access to grass all the time, how much, if any hay would I have to feed them? And oats? I don't think much, right?

And ya, me and my boyfriend were talking yesterday about leaving a couple trees in there for them.
And yes, I sort of know about the farrier and deworming and vaccinations, Thanks! Lol

So I always just thought that keeping a horse was SOOOO expensive! Looks like it isnt as bad as I thought it would be...I hope I'm right, lol.
     
    09-10-2009, 12:52 AM
  #5
Started
Lol...I was just making sure you were adding in all the expenses. Oats are not really a requirement I don't think. As far as feed you really have to go by the individual horse. I normally ride my horse every day and if I'm not careful he starts dropping weight. I give him a scoop of sweet feed and a scoop of oats a day in the summer time, plus he has access to grass all day. I have found that combination keeps him from dropping weight or getting to nervous and jumpy and he has plenty of energy. My sisters horse is a little fatty and can only get a handful of grain a day. As for hay in the summer...I decide that based on how the pasture is holding up. We haven't had to use very much this year because we have had plenty of rain and the grass has stayed in good shape. You can't just assume that they won't need hay though...when it gets really dry or really rainy for a while the pasture grass can get bad fast.
I think horses are a little expensive, but worth every penny!!! I adore my horse and have so much fun with him. I love riding, grooming, petting him and even mucking out stalls and scrubbing water buckets. I think you're going to love having horses.
     
    09-10-2009, 03:33 AM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by sandy2u1    
lol...I was just making sure you were adding in all the expenses. Oats are not really a requirement I don't think. As far as feed you really have to go by the individual horse. I normally ride my horse every day and if I'm not careful he starts dropping weight. I give him a scoop of sweet feed and a scoop of oats a day in the summer time, plus he has access to grass all day. I have found that combination keeps him from dropping weight or getting to nervous and jumpy and he has plenty of energy. My sisters horse is a little fatty and can only get a handful of grain a day. As for hay in the summer...I decide that based on how the pasture is holding up. We haven't had to use very much this year because we have had plenty of rain and the grass has stayed in good shape. You can't just assume that they won't need hay though...when it gets really dry or really rainy for a while the pasture grass can get bad fast.
I think horses are a little expensive, but worth every penny!!! I adore my horse and have so much fun with him. I love riding, grooming, petting him and even mucking out stalls and scrubbing water buckets. I think you're going to love having horses.

Oh I know, thanks for checking though!

Anyways thanks for the tips about how much hay would be needed, and about the pasture grass! It really does help, and I understand the whole thing better now! I really love learning about horses!
     
    09-10-2009, 03:40 AM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saskia    
Depending on how close the trees are you might not have to do much. I've known lots of horses to be kept in paddocks with trees. If you can find a semi clear spot then you could probably just use that.

Otherwise fencing is a big issue. You want good, solid fences that are safe, and wide, easy gates. In addition, you will need access to water. For paddocks installing an automatic water trough is often the best bet. It would be a good idea to maybe consider building a solid small yard to feed and tack up your horse in, as well as to tie your horse up to and keep it in if it needs to be contained (lame or something). It wouldn't be a bad idea to consider putting up a little shed to keep feed and tack in.

Although many horses can survive of pasture I always supplement their feeds with vitamins and minerals, as often the soil isn't rich enough to provide everything a horse needs.

I would probably get five acres (and absolute minimum for me would be 2 acres for two horses), and its often a good idea (if possible) to have two or three paddocks so that you can rotate the horses and allow the grass to rest/regrow. That will depend on your individual paddocks. Also ensure they have some shelter/windblock.

Also, check for any harmful weeds and weed paddock if necessary.
Thanks for the help!

And we were thinking of building a, I don't know the right term for it, but a "stable"/shelter with two stalls, maybe three, with a tack room in it also.

And depending on the size, we would do at least two, maybe even divide it into three paddocks.
     

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