Goosey cutting horses - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
 40Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 104 Old 02-05-2012, 01:05 AM
rob
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Raceland, LA
Posts: 631
• Horses: 0
if you all don't mind,i'm going to cut in on this dance.i am a professional cutting horse trainer but i don't want to argue.i'm like you cc,i don't do alot of groundwork unless i see the need,but i do get my colts ready for the farrier and vet.but my horses are real jumpy to the move and touch,cause let's face it,if he's laid back or deadsided,he more than likely wont take you to the pay window.

Live each day as if it is your last for tomorrow is not promised!
rob is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 104 Old 02-05-2012, 01:14 AM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: The sandbox
Posts: 5,539
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by rob View Post
if you all don't mind,i'm going to cut in on this dance.i am a professional cutting horse trainer but i don't want to argue.i'm like you cc,i don't do alot of groundwork unless i see the need,but i do get my colts ready for the farrier and vet.but my horses are real jumpy to the move and touch,cause let's face it,if he's laid back or deadsided,he more than likely wont take you to the pay window.
LOL, not at all! hoping you would....

I DON'T LEAD 'EM AND FEED 'EM, I RIDE 'EM AND SLIDE 'EM.
COWCHICK77 is offline  
post #13 of 104 Old 02-05-2012, 01:20 AM
rob
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Raceland, LA
Posts: 631
• Horses: 0
i've trained some as to when they feel my leg to go out and hook him,he's already gone.he don't give me a chance to hook him,cause he's been trained to get there.
AmazinCaucasian likes this.

Live each day as if it is your last for tomorrow is not promised!
rob is offline  
post #14 of 104 Old 02-05-2012, 01:28 AM Thread Starter
Yearling
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 1,038
• Horses: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by rob View Post
if you all don't mind,i'm going to cut in on this dance.i am a professional cutting horse trainer but i don't want to argue.i'm like you cc,i don't do alot of groundwork unless i see the need,but i do get my colts ready for the farrier and vet.but my horses are real jumpy to the move and touch,cause let's face it,if he's laid back or deadsided,he more than likely wont take you to the pay window.
Trainers-1

AmazinCaucasian-0

Im loosing :(
AmazinCaucasian is offline  
post #15 of 104 Old 02-05-2012, 01:30 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Higgins, TX. YeeHaw!!
Posts: 22,188
• Horses: 24
I don't know, man. Being who I am and doing what I do, I can appreciate a horse that can get down and suck back to get there, but I am not willing to sacrifice a horse's good nature for it.

AC, we've got a horse that is cutting bred that is that way. Every little thing you do on the ground and he thinks you are going to grow huge teeth and eat him. Getting shoes on him is almost an all-day ordeal and the shoer has to really understand horses to be able to get it done at all.

None of this has anything to do with his training/handling, he's been like this since I bought him as a birthday present for my Dad as a yearling. No amount of handling or training makes him any better, it's just the way he is and we just have to deal with it. I really hate it that he turned out this way but he and Dad still seem to fit together well. Plus, he's a very nice riding horse, you can do about anything you need to on him....except when what you need to do requires getting off and back on in a hurry.

Personally, I truly dislike the horse, if he were mine, he probably would have been a horseburger years ago....but ****, he can watch a cow.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
smrobs is offline  
post #16 of 104 Old 02-05-2012, 01:43 AM
rob
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Raceland, LA
Posts: 631
• Horses: 0
so smrobs,i'm assuming you don't care for the jump at their own shadow type of horses.

Live each day as if it is your last for tomorrow is not promised!
rob is offline  
post #17 of 104 Old 02-05-2012, 01:54 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Higgins, TX. YeeHaw!!
Posts: 22,188
• Horses: 24
Nope, not really.

I don't mind it so much on greenies, that's pretty much par for the course. But on a horse that's supposed to be broke, I expect to be able to handle them without being at risk of death every moment.

Maybe it's just me, but when it comes to a horses nature, my preference leans toward trustworthy rather than talented. If they have both, that's awesome, but I won't keep a horse I can't trust just because he's great at his job.

Mostly because there are horses out there that are both. Horses that do have good, solid natures and are still crazy talented.
csimkunas6, bsms and Ace80908 like this.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
smrobs is offline  
post #18 of 104 Old 02-05-2012, 02:00 AM
rob
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Raceland, LA
Posts: 631
• Horses: 0
i agree,and it has to do with their handling and training.but i'll be honest,my preference is taking the jumpy athlete,cause i like aggressive horses.
AmazinCaucasian likes this.

Live each day as if it is your last for tomorrow is not promised!
rob is offline  
post #19 of 104 Old 02-05-2012, 02:10 AM Thread Starter
Yearling
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 1,038
• Horses: 4
Guys please understand too, I'm usually on here to aggravate people, but I'm being serious on this one. Yes, I think it would be fun to argue, but I might learn something from you guys. So far, three of the most knowledgeable people on here have posted and that's what I hoped would happen.

I think we all love to feel a good horse do a good job. I just wonder if anyone's ever put much though into this. You know, as horses get better at cutting, I think this could be a real problem.

Hypothetically, What would you think if a farrier rubbed you're horse down and just spent as long as it took to get a jumpy horse gentle enough to stand quiet? Would it make you mad? Do you think that horse is smart enough to know the difference between you and the farrier? Do you think that horse would kind of associate seeing a guy with a shoeing box and tools with rubbing and wollering, and then become quiet? I know how these horses are wired and I know how tough it is to overcome their tendencies.

Last edited by AmazinCaucasian; 02-05-2012 at 02:15 AM.
AmazinCaucasian is offline  
post #20 of 104 Old 02-05-2012, 02:32 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Higgins, TX. YeeHaw!!
Posts: 22,188
• Horses: 24
Oh, I don't see any hint of argument here, just a good discussion of what we like and why .

Personally, I think it is a serious problem. Yeah, they might be great cutters, but if their disposition is so scattered, what job could they hope to have after their years of cutting? If they are that touchy, they wouldn't make good novice or youth horses (like many good cutters do when they start to slow down a bit and aren't at the top of their game anymore), they would never survive ranch work without stressing themselves into a constant state of panic, most of them wouldn't even make good trail horses because you can't trust them not to freak at every new thing that pops up.

Plus, people don't stop to think that not all farriers are like you and my brother, not all of them are willing to work with a horse that is difficult or skittish. There are a lot of farriers that will flat out refuse a horse that won't stand perfectly still the entire time.

For me, breeding/training for horses that are naturally so goosey that they pretty much can't have a life outside of the cutting pen is on par with breeding racehorses with crappy feet and chicken bones. Yep, they might be good at one particular job, but they they aren't worth a **** anywhere else.

The horse that I was discussing earlier, Pokey, wouldn't have had a chance with anyone that didn't match up to my Dad's knowledge and ability. Hell, I know I wouldn't have been able to get him broke. But, I also know that no matter how nice a horse he may be for us, we could never confidently sell him as a riding horse because somebody that knew just a little bit of something about nice horses would get themselves killed trying to mess with him.

I don't consider that a good trait, even if he is a crackerjack cutter .

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
smrobs is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Downsides of cutting horses.... SorrelHorse Cutting and Team Penning 19 01-19-2012 12:12 AM
can this years first cutting hay be fed to horses? garlicbunny Horse Health 10 06-16-2011 08:19 AM
Cutting Bred Horses Barrel Racing? AQHA Horse Breeding 13 02-17-2011 07:15 PM
Gil Porter Cutting Horses kitten_Val Western Riding 33 08-24-2009 12:22 PM
Question about cutting horses Sara Western Riding 30 03-03-2009 11:38 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome